Tag Archives: Yinlan Ruan

Magnetically sensitive optical fibre demonstrated

19 January 2018:

A new paper featuring CNBP researchers demonstrates magnetically sensitive nanodiamond-doped tellurite glass fibres. This work is a first step towards magneto-sensitive fibre devices which could be used in medical magneto-endoscopy and remote mineral exploration sensing. First author of the paper is CNBP AI, Dr Yinlan Ruan from the University of Adelaide.

Journal: Scientific Reports.

Publication titleMagnetically sensitive nanodiamond-doped tellurite glass fibers.

Authors: Yinlan Ruan, David A. Simpson, Jan Jeske, Heike Ebendorff-Heidepriem, Desmond W. M. Lau, Hong Ji, Brett C. Johnson, Takeshi Ohshima, Shahraam Afshar V., Lloyd Hollenberg, Andrew D. Greentree, Tanya M. Monro & Brant C. Gibson.

Abstract: Traditional optical fibers are insensitive to magnetic fields, however many applications would benefit from fiber-based magnetometry devices. In this work, we demonstrate a magnetically sensitive optical fiber by doping nanodiamonds containing nitrogen vacancy centers into tellurite glass fibers. The fabrication process provides a robust and isolated sensing platform as the magnetic sensors are fixed in the tellurite glass matrix. Using optically detected magnetic resonance from the doped nanodiamonds, we demonstrate detection of local magnetic fields via side excitation and longitudinal collection. This is a first step towards intrinsically magneto-sensitive fiber devices with future applications in medical magneto-endoscopy and remote mineral exploration sensing.

Latest paper published in Scientific Reports

Yinlan-Ruan-(3)22 February 2016:

CNBP researchers have published a paper in the journal Scientific Reports. Demonstrated is a novel but simple method for creating transparent conductive reduced graphene oxide film onto microstructured silica fibres for potential optoelectronic applications.

Title: Integration of conductive reduced graphene oxide into microstructured optical fibres for optoelectronics applications.

Authors: Yinlan Ruan, Liyun Ding, Jingjing Duan, Heike Ebendorff-Heidepriem & Tanya M. Monro.

Abstract: Integration of conductive materials into optical fibres can largely expand functions of fibre devices including surface plasmon resonator/metamaterial, modulators/detectors, or biosensors. Some early attempts have been made to incorporate metals such as tin into fibres during the fibre drawing process. Due to the restricted range of materials that have compatible melting temperatures with that of silica glass, the methods to incorporate metals along the length of the fibres are very challenging. Moreover, metals are nontransparent with strong light absorption, which causes high fibre loss. This article demonstrates a novel but simple method for creating transparent conductive reduced graphene oxide film onto microstructured silica fibres for potential optoelectronic applications. The strongly confined evanescent field of the suspended core fibres with only 2 μW average power was creatively used to transform graphene oxide into reduced graphene oxide with negligible additional loss. Existence of reduced graphene oxide was confirmed by their characteristic Raman signals, shifting of their fluorescence peaks as well as largely decreased resistance of the bulk GO film after laser beam exposure.

The paper is open access and available online.

Concordia College visits CNBP

IMG_Georgios-lab_adjustedweb21 September 2015:

Students of Concordia College were left with an improved understanding of nano biophotonics, as well as the opportunities that a science education can provide, following a visit to the CNBP at the University of Adelaide earlier today.

Impressed students were shown around CNBP laboratories by researchers Georgios Tsiminis and Yinlan Ruan, and were also given a number of  presentations, explaining in greater detail what it is that the Centre is hoping to achieve with its multi-disciplinary approach to research.

It is hoped that CNBP visits from Concordia College will be an ongoing activity, helping inspire younger students with a passion for science and technology.