Tag Archives: visit

IVF grant success

26 April 2017:

CNBP Chief Investigator, A/Prof Jeremy Thompson has received $7000 in travel support from the Global Connections Fund Priming Grants initiative.

The grant will fund travel to the USA to visit cattle IVF units with the aim of learning how they have made a successful business of in vitro produced embryos, and where it applies best in their (beef) breeding and genetic selection operations.

While there, A/Prof Thompson will be sharing knowledge and experiences and seeing if there are potential collaborative opportunities.

OCT probe talks

12 February 2017:

Dr Jiawen Li, CNBP researcher, has given a number of invited talks, on her ongoing work with optical coherence tomography (OCT) and fiber-optic needle probes.

Her talks were focused on addressing the penetration-depth limitation of optical imaging through the development of miniaturised fibre-optic probes that may be inserted deep into the body.

Representative technologies and their ex vivo and in vivo applications were presented by Jiawen at both the Wellman Center for Photomedicine at Harvard Medical School (HMS) as well as at Polytechnic Montreal.

She saw great value in both visits, noting:

“I first visited the Wellman Center for Photomedicine (Feb 6th-7th), where I gave a talk, and met with Dr. Melissa Suter and Prof. Brett Bouma and their postdoctoral teams. Researchers there also gave me a tour of their laboratories. They showed me prototypes that they had made for clinical applications and shared with me their insights as to how to achieve successful and enhance efficient collaborations with clinicians. Attendees at my talk were very interested in our work on smart needles for safer and more effective brain surgery and on fabricating miniaturized lenses by the 3D printer at CNBP RMIT node, a project that is supported by a CNBP travel grant. Potential future collaborations were also explored.”

“At Polytechnic Montreal (Feb 8th-10th), I met with A/Prof. Caroline Boudoux, a collaborator on our fluorescence-OCT project, as well as postdoctoral researchers of A/Prof. Frederic Leblond. I visited both A/Prof. Leblond’s laboratory and A/Prof. Boudoux’s spin-out company Castor Optics. A technical meeting was held, where we discussed solutions to overcoming technical challenges in our current design. This visit strengthened our existing collaboration.”

A busy time for Jiawen, she also managed to fit in an oral presentation at the SPIE Photonics West 2017 Conference on January 28th , 2017. Her presentation was titled, “Flexible OCT needle probes for image-guided endoscopic tissue aspiration.”

 

Prof Montarop Yamabhai visits CNBP

18 March 201Ewa and Montarop5

Professor Ewa Goldys from the MQ node  welcomed a new visitor  this week.

Professor  Montarop Yamabhai  is affiliated  with the School of Biotechnology, Suranaree University of Technology Suranari Nakhon Ratchasima in Thailand. She is a recipient of the Endeavour fellowship and she will spend 2 months at Macquarie University.

Montarop and Ewa plan to develop  a joint program in the area of biosensing with peptides. They are planning student exchanges and joint funding applications.

 

Dr Georgios Tsiminis visits Oxford University

georgiostsiminis28 January 2015: Department of Pharmacology, Oxford University.

“Taking a closer look at vitamin B12”, delivered by CNBP researcher Dr Georgios Tsiminis and  co-author Dr Joanna Brooks from the ARC Centre for Research on Ageing, Health and Wellbeing at the Australian National University.

The talk gave an overview on the potential for using Raman spectroscopy as a minimally invasive tool to measure and track vitamin B12 levels in humans. Vitamin B12 deficiency has been identified as a potential modifiable risk factor for dementia and Alzheimer’s disease in later life and is also the mechanism through which pernicious anaemia affects humans (vitamin B12 does not get absorbed through food due to lack of intrinsic factor). Current techniques for measuring vitamin B12 in humans, such as microbial growth and ELISAs, are both resource- and time-consuming, resulting in the general population not being regularly tested for vitamin B12 deficiency. Our aim is to produce a portable device that can measure vitamin B12 and its associated chemical compounds in a reproducible, reliable, fast and minimally-invasive manor. In this talk we explained the basic principles of Raman spectroscopy and showed some initial results that generated great interest at Oxford, who have asked us to keep them up to date with future developments on our work.

To find out a bit more about this presentation see Martyn Hooper’s Blog post “the Blog from  he chair of the Pernicious Anaemia Society.