Tag Archives: SciCommunity

NeuRA Invited Seminar Series

Ewa Goldys Low Res Edit 015925 November 2016:

Professor Ewa Goldys, Deputy Director of the CNBP, has given an invited talk at the Neuroscience Research Australia (NeuRA) Invited Lecture series, 25th November 2016, Sydney.

The talk was titled “A Eureka moment for cell colour technology” and explored the research behind Prof Goldys and her success in being awarded the 2016 Australian Museum Eureka Prize for ‘Innovative Use of Technology’.

Professor Goldys and her team were recognised for their innovative colour-focused research (and pioneering hyperspectral imaging technique), able to distinguish between healthy and diseased cells, in areas as diverse as embryology, neurodegeneration, cancer and diabetes.

Real-world translational outcomes that will result from this exciting area of study, that will support clinicians in making improved diagnosis and health decisions for patients, was also discussed.

The NeuRA lecture series attracts leading national and international researchers from all fields of neuroscience.

 

PLGA nanocomposites developed for PDT of cancer cells

staff photos for Centre of Excellence in Nanoscale Biophotonics (CNBP)24 November 2016:

In this latest paper, CNBP researchers (lead author Wei Deng pictured left) developed PLGA nanocomposites by incorporating a photosensitizer, verteporfin and gold nanoparticles into the polymeric matrix and utilised them for enhanced photodynamic therapy of cancer cells.

Journal: RSC Advances.

Title: PLGA nanocomposites loaded with verteporfin and gold nanoparticles for enhanced photodynamic therapy of cancer cells.

Authors: Wei Deng, Zofia Kautzka, Wenjie Chen and Ewa M Goldys.

Abstract: In this paper, PLGA nanocomposites were developed by incorporating a photosensitizer, verteporfin and gold nanoparticles into the polymeric matrix and utilised for enhanced photodynamic therapy of cancer cells. Both enhanced fluorescence and O2 generation from verteporfin were observed in this new formulation under both 425 nm LED and 405 nm laser illumination. A maximum enhancement factor of 2.5 for fluorescence and 1.84 for O2 generation was obtained when the molar ratio of gold : VP was 5:1 and excited at 425 nm, compared with PLGA doped with verteporfin alone. The experiment results could be explained by the local electric field enhancement of gold nanoparticles. Furthermore, improved therapeutic efficacy in human pancreatic cancer cells, PANC-1, was also demonstrated by using this new formulation following light exposure, indicating the utility of these nanocomposites for enhanced photodynamic therapy.

The paper is accessible online.

Key player in GPCR research to visit CNBP

sanam Mustafa14 November 2016:

Dr Sanam Mustafa has organised the visit to CNBP of a key player in the field of G protein-coupled receptors research, Professor Graeme Milligan.

The visit will take place in Adelaide, Friday 25th November 2016 – If you would like to chat with Professor Milligan please contact Dr Sanam Mustafa via email (sanam.mustafa@adelaide.edu.au).

Professor Milligan’s main research group centres on the function, structure and regulation of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) and their interacting proteins. He has published some 500 peer-reviewed articles on these topics. His research has been cited more than 24,000 times. Professor Graeme Milligan graduated with a Bachelor of Science in Biochemistry from the University of Birmingham. He went on to do his PhD at the University of Nottingham. Graeme was elected to the Fellowship of the Royal Society of Edinburgh in 1998 and, amongst various honours, was the recipient of the Ariens Award for pharmacology from the Dutch Pharmacological Society in 2006 and the JR Vane Medal for Pharmacology from the British Pharmacological Society in 2016. Professor Milligan is currently a Professor of Molecular Pharmacology, Dean of Research, College of Medical, Veterinary and Life Sciences and a Gardiner Professor of Biochemistry at the University of Glasgow. Professor Milligan is also a non-executive director and co-founder of the company Caldan Therapeutics which is searching for novel treatments for type II diabetes.

Professor Milligan will first present a keynote address at the Adelaide Pharmacology Group Meeting at the National Wine Centre on Friday 25th, followed by an afternoon tour of CNBP and one-to-one meetings.

 

 

Visit to Hoshi University by Director

Mark Hutchinson_1_low_sq7 November 2016:

The CNBP Director (Professor Mark Hutchinson) visited the Department of Pharmacology at Hoshi University on the 7th November 2016 where he met with Professor Minoru Narita, provided a 10 minute introduction speech to undergraduate student lectures and provided a seminar to senior researchers and graduate students.

Professor Hutchinson’s talk was titled, “The role of toll-like receptors as key modulators of chronic pain: similarities and differences between male and females.”

SPIE BioPhotonics Australasia lights up Adelaide

bau16-art20 October 2016:

The inaugural SPIE BioPhotonics Australasia conference took place in Adelaide, Australia, from the 16th-19th October 2016.

Close to 200 world leading researchers, clinicians, policy-makers, suppliers and other industry professionals were in attendance at the event which was jointly hosted by the ARC Centre of Excellence for Nanoscale BioPhotonics and SPIE (The International Society for Optics and Photonics).

Over the course of the four day conference, the latest in light-based technologies and techniques were explored, with the objective of improving understanding of biology, and increasing knowledge of how living systems work at a cellular and molecular level. Biomedical, diagnostic and advanced imaging applications all featured as part of the innovative research-led program.

Plenary talks and themed sessions took place, as did speed science discussions and networking opportunities focused on increasing research and industry engagement. An exhibition hall featured company booths, demonstrating the latest in advanced microscopy and imaging equipment.

The conference also focused on inspiring the next generation of scientists, with one-hundred South Australian students visiting the event to take part in a half-day outreach session that included talks, poster sessions, light inspired science demonstrations and discussion time with leading researchers.

Prof Mark Hutchinson, CNBP Director, believed the conference to be highly successful noting, “We attracted top international researchers here to South Australia including six plenary speakers who are experts in the photonics field. Talks ranged from new imaging technologies to help us understand how brains work, through to new 3D techniques to model living tissue, to new fibre-optical sensors that can be used in the tiniest of nano-environments. The program was absolutely full of exciting research.”

The event’s two co-hosts (SPIE and the CNBP) are already exploring opportunities for an even larger follow-up conference to potentially take place in 2018.

Below – Conference attendees make their way into the main auditorium.

attending-spie-conference

Director attends IASP 16th World Congress on Pain

Mark Hutchinson_1_low_sq30 September 2016:

Professor Mark Hutchinson, CNBP Director has attended the IASP 16th World Congress on Pain in Yokohama, Japan, 26-30th September 2016. The event is the world’s premier conference devoted to pain research and treatment, with Prof Hutchinson also speaking at a session during the conference with a talk titled, ‘The role of toll-like receptors as key modulators of chronic pain: similarities and differences between males and females’.

During this overseas visit to Japan, Professor Hutchinson also took a small delegation of staff from the Pain Unit of the Royal Adelaide Hospital to visit Nagoya University where they met with Professor Akihiro Yamanaka, Dr Hideki Kasuya and Dr Ossama El-Kabbani. Here Prof Hutchinson presented a talk entitled, ‘ The Beacon of Enlightenment – how light based sensing technologies can change and quantify the previously unmeasurable and lead to changes in clinical practice’.

Oocyte IVM defined

Jeremy Thompson22 September 2016:

A/Prof Jeremy Thompson, CNBP CI is coauthor on the following research paper that explores definitions relating to ‘oocyte in vitro maturation (IVM)’. It follows recent attempts to clarify apparent differences among clinicians in use of the term.

Journal: Human Reproduction

Title: The Definition of IVM is Clear – Variations need Defining.

Authors: Michel De Vos, Johan Smitz, Jeremy G Thompson and Robert B Gilchrist.

Abstract: Oocyte in vitro maturation (IVM) is currently defined as the maturation in vitro of immature cumulus-oocyte complexes collected from antral follicles. This is the original definition as first described by Pincus and Enzmann and then by Edwards many decades ago, and this clear and unambiguous definition has served us well ever since. In an attempt to clarify apparent differences among clinicians, the following revised definition of IVM was recently proposed: ‘The retrieval of oocytes from small and intermediate sized follicles in an ovary before the largest follicle has surpassed 13 mm in mean diameter’. As such, this proposed definition should encompass the use of hCG triggering. To change the clear and long-serving definition of IVM to fit varying clinical practices requires a compelling justification based on solid scientific and clinical grounds. We are of the opinion that the proposed revised definition of IVM is counterintuitive as it includes protocols that are intended to mature oocytes in vivo The proposed definitions are cumbersome and indeed further complicate the situation. It is not scientifically rational to base the definition on follicular size, and the definition ignores the vast corporate knowledge acquired from the many decades and >6000 publications in animal research that universally practices IVM as per the existing definition. Furthermore, such a definition can lead to false results in interpreting the follow-up of children conceived using IVM. Hence, we see no rationale to change the existing definition of IVM. However, we agree that variations on IVM require alternative nomenclature-these definitions need to be intuitive and need to clearly distinguish themselves from the existing long-standing definition of IVM. This would help to clarify the recent confusion within the clinical ART community as to what is and what is not, IVM.

The paper is accessible online.

 

New CNBP laboratory opened at Macquarie University

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA6 September 2016:

CNBP’s new ‘Biomolecular Discovery Laboratory’, along with two other new laboratories at Macquarie University (a redeveloped Synthetic Biology Lab and new research facilities for Organometallics), were officially opened today by Professor Mary O’Kane, NSW Chief Scientist and Engineer.

The opening event, hosted by Macquarie University’s Deputy Vice-Chancellor (Research), Professor Sakkie Pretorius saw a number of VIP guests in attendance including CNBP Director, Prof Mark Hutchinson.

Hutchinson who spoke at the official opening noted the close collaboration between Macquarie University and the CNBP and explained how the relationship between the two organisations exemplified and gave real meaning to the Centre’s four key belief principles of Academic Excellence, Commercial Impact, Quality Communication and a Nurturing Environment.

The new CNBP laboratory space at Macquarie University will host twenty-four CNBP researchers and will support the development of new biomolecular probes and methodology, the functionalisation of nanoparticles, as well as the investigation of nanoparticle mechanisms and drug delivery.

Additionally, it will facilitate interactions between CNBP chemists, mass spectrometrists, biochemists, physicists and biologists in a large single area, aiding CNBP interdisciplinary research in the development of its new light based sensing tools that operate at the nanoscale.

Below – Professor Mary O’Kane, NSW Chief Scientist and Engineer cuts a ribbon to formally open the laboratory spaces while guests look on.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Official IPHT partner launch

IPHT launch_sq25 August 2016:

CNBP and the Leibniz Institute of Photonic Technology (IPHT) in Jena officially acknowledged their long term research and collaboration activity with a formal partnership launch today, taking place at IPHT HQ in Germany.

CNBP Deputy Director Prof Ewa Goldys, CNBP Macquarie University Node Leader Prof Jim Piper and CNBP RMIT University Node Leader A/Prof Brant Gibson were all in attendance at the event which was hosted and led by Partner, Prof Jurgen Popp from IPHT. CNBP’s Associate Investigator, Dr Stephen Warren-Smith who is just concluding his Marie Curie Fellowship with IPHT, and will be returning to the University of Adelaide after securing a Ramsay Fellowship, was also present and attended the program of the 3 day partner launch.

Included as a part of launch activity were presentations from both organisations, tours of IPHT laboratory space, research updates on key projects and engagement with CNBP industry partner Heraeus.

Specific highlights from the visit included the opening of the partner launch at the Scala Tower Restaurant in Jena with CNBP’s Prof Jim Piper presenting a keynote presentation, a tour of the InfectoGnostic Research Campus and a visit to Zeiss, concluding with a lecture from Prof Ewa Goldys.

Pictured top left is IPHT Partner, Prof Jurgen Popp being presented with the CNBP Partner Plaque by CNBP Deputy Director Prof Ewa Goldys.

CNBP’s recognize theme expands

Andrew-Abell-224 August 2016:

There have been a number of updates from CNBP’s Recognise Theme (focused on creating optically-controlled surfaces to recognise molecules in living systems) led by Chief Investigator Prof Andrew Abell (pictured top left) from the University of Adelaide. Updates include –

  • Prof Irene Hudson from the University of Newcastle has been appointed Associative Investigator, as has Dr Abel Santos from the School of Chemical Engineering,  University of Adelaide. Both will work closley with the recognise theme
  • Birgit Gaiser will be joining the recognise theme for 6 months from the University of Copenhagen as an international visitor
  • Kathryn Palasis has joined the recognise theme as an honours student to work on photoswitchable proteasome inhibitors
  • Aniket Kulkarni has joined the recognise theme as a new PhD student to work on hypoxia switchable anti cancer agents
  • Two new postdocs join the recognise theme: Dr Beatriz Blanco Rodriguez has joined to work on hypoxia switchable anti cancer agents (funded from outside the CNBP). Dr Borja Lopez Perez has also joined the recognise theme to work on hypoxia switchable anti cancer agents (and likewise is funded from outside the CNBP)
  • Yuan Qi Yeoh from the recognise theme was awarded first class honours
  • And finally, Pan Yanbo from Hong Kong has been awarded a University of Adelaide international PhD scholarship to join the recognise theme.

Busy and exciting times!