Tag Archives: Philipp Reineck

Science ‘Experience Day’ at RMIT

18 January 2017:

Researchers at CNBP’s RMIT University node were busy doing light-based demonstrations on Wednesday Jan 18th, as part of the ‘RMIT University Experience Day’ program, whereby students from years 10, 11 and 12 get to engage in hands-on workshops and explore life on campus while experiencing the differing aspects of University discipline areas.

As part of the ‘experience’ activity, over seventy high school students (predominantly in Year 10) visited the CNBP researchers in their physics laboratories. While there, students were given an overview of biophotonic science as well as laboratory research, and shown the exciting things that can be done with light including 3D scanning, fluorescence microscopy and more.

Below – CNBP researcher Philipp Reineck talks and demonstrates photonics to students.

 

 

 

New paper in ‘Nanoscale’

Low Res Edit 01065 December 2016:

A new publication from CNBP researchers (lead author Philipp Reineck pictured) demonstrates bright and photostable fluorescence from nitrogen-vacancy centers in unprocessed nanodiamond particle aggregates. The work has just been reported in the journal ‘Nanoscale’ and is accessible online.

Journal: Nanoscale.

Title: Bright and photostable nitrogen-vacancy fluorescence from unprocessed detonation nanodiamond.

Authors: P. Reineck, M. Capelli, D. W. M. Lau, J. Jeske, M. R. Field, T. Ohshim, A. D. Greentree and B. C. Gibson.

Abstract: Bright and photostable fluorescence from nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centers is demonstrated in unprocessed detonation nanodiamond particle aggregates. The optical properties of these particles is analyzed using confocal fluorescence microscopy and spectroscopy, time resolved fluorescence decay measurements, and optically detected magnetic resonance experiments. Two particle populations with distinct optical properties are identified and compared to high-pressure high-temperature (HPHT) fluorescent
nanodiamonds. We find that the brightness of one detonation nanodiamond particle population is on the same order as that of highly processed fluorescent 100 nm HPHT nanodiamonds. Our results may open the path to a simple and up-scalable route for
the production of fluorescent NV nanodiamonds for use in bioimaging applications.

Coverage: Tiny gemstones advance nanoscale imaging

Low Res Edit 010620 July 2016:

A research team at the ARC Centre of Excellence for Nanoscale BioPhotonics (CNBP) – led by Dr Philipp Reineck (pictured) from RMIT University’s School of Science – tested ruby and diamond particles, more than a thousand times smaller than the diameter of a hair, alongside other nanoparticles for use in biological imaging, and found that they have a higher degree of stability, critical to achieving imaging success. You can read more about it in the online publication ‘Science meets Business’.

Brightness and photostability of nanomaterials for bioimaging

Low Res Edit 010623 June 2016:

CNBP Research Fellow Dr Philipp Reineck (RMIT University node) is lead author on a new research paper, reporting on ‘Brightness and Photostability of Emerging Red and Near-IR Fluorescent Nanomaterials for Bioimaging.’

The work was co-authored by CNBP researchers A/Prof Brant Gibson, Dr Antony Orth and Dr Desmond Lau.

Journal: Advanced Optical Materials

Publication title: Brightness and photostability of emerging red and near-IR fluorescent nanomaterials for bioimaging.

Authors: Philipp Reineck, Adam Francis, Antony Orth, Desmond Wai Mo Lau, Reece David Valmont Nixon-Luke, Ishan Das Rastogi, Wan Aizuddin Wan Razali, Nicole Maree Cordina, Lindsay Marie Parker, Varun Kumaraswamy Annayya Sreenivasan, Louise Jennifer Brown and Brant Cameron Gibson.

Abstract:
Many novel fluorescent nanomaterials exhibit radically different optical properties compared to organic fluorophores that are still the most extensively used class of fluorophores in biology today. Assessing the practical impact of these optical differences for bioimaging experiments is challenging due to a lack of published quantitative benchmarking data. This study therefore directly and quantitatively compares the brightness and photostability of representatives from seven classes of fluorescent materials in spectroscopy and fluorescence microscopy experiments for the first time. These material classes are: organic dyes, semiconductor quantum dots, fluorescent beads, carbon dots, gold nanoclusters, nanodiamonds, and nanorubies. The relative brightness of each material is determined and the minimum material concentrations required to generate sufficient contrast in a fluorescence microscopy image are assessed. The influence of optical filters used for imaging is also discussed and suitable filter combinations are identified. The photostability of all materials is determined under typical imaging conditions and the number of images that can be acquired is inferred. The results are expected to facilitate the transition of novel fluorescent materials from physics and chemistry into biology laboratories.

The publication is accessible online.

Below – An artistic representation of nano-diamonds being used to light up and image a long chain of proteins. Image courtesy of Dr Carlo Bradac.

Nanodiamonds image

 

CNBP researchers at ICONN 2016

Peipei-Jia7 February 2016:

CNBP researchers Peipei Jia (pictured), Philipp Reineck, Ivan Maksymov, Sabrina Heng and Daniel Stubing all attended the International Conference on Nanoscience and Nanotechnology (ICONN), in Canberra (7-11 February 2016).

Peipei Jia, CNBP Research Fellow, presented an invited talk on the topic ‘Large-area Gold Nanomembrane by Template Transfer with a Soluble Polymer’.

Philipp presented a poster on the nanoparticle comparison project, Daniel  presented a poster titled “Reversible Ion Sensing With a Flip of a Switch”, while Ivan gave an oral talk on “Photoacoustic nanoantennae for intravascular imaging.”

Sabrina’s poster presentation was titled, “Microstructured Optical Fibers and Photoswitches: Light-Driven Sensors for Metal Ions.”

The event covered the areas of nanostructure growth, synthesis, fabrication, characterization, device design, theory, modeling, testing, applications, commercialisation, and health and safety aspects of nanotechnology.

Further information on the conference is available online.

 

CNBP researchers get ‘Fresh’

Fresh-Science-Vic_web29 July 2015:

Summarizing your research and why it matters in one sentence is hard enough! But when you’re in front of a camera, with a microphone and a curious channel 7 reporter looking at you intently, you really do have to be prepared to get your simple message across. This is what CNBP researchers Daniel Drumm and Philipp Reineck learnt quickly at this year’s ‘Fresh Science Victoria’ program, that took place in Melbourne, July 28-29th , 2015.

The ‘fresh’ program, encouraging public and educational outreach from early career researchers, saw two intensive days of activity (July 28-29) for the two CNBPers who:

– had a full outreach training day at Scienceworks
– workshopped their scientific activity into language clearly understandable to a lay audience
– met with people from Channels 7 and 9, The Age, 3AW and Triple M
– explored the different needs of radio vs. print vs. television media
– met Victoria’s Lead Scientist, Leonie Walsh
– worked on inverting their communication thinking to present the global results first
– presented their projects to the public with a sparkler as a timer (Bright Sparks)
– distilled their work into as few a syllables as possible via haiku and limerick
– met some amazing young scientists from around Victoria with a broad set of skills (physio, geomatics, cancer research, biomechanics, and physics)
– presented their work on stage to an audience of high-school students at Melbourne Museum

Further information on Fresh Science – Stories of discovery from early-career researchers around Australia – is available online.

CNBP researchers meet with high profile politicians

Tony Abbott PM26 March 2015:

The CNBP recently completed an extremely successful visit to Canberra, taking part in ‘Science Meets Parliament’, an event coordinated by Science and Technology Australia.

The event brought together 200 working scientists for a two-day program of professional development and networking, aimed at helping them better communicate their science to the media, policymakers and parliamentarians.

CNBP Chief Investigators and researchers met with Malcolm Turnbull (Minister for Communications), Nick Xenophon (Independent Senator for South Australia), Christine Milne (Leader of the Australian Greens) and Julie Owens, MP. The undoubted highlight of the event however, was the opportunity for two CNBP scientists, Sabrina Heng and Philipp Reineck to meet with Australian Prime Minster Tony Abbott where they gave a broad overview of their research and the activities of the CNBP more generally.

Philipp Reineck enjoyed the experience noting, “Mr Abbott was very interested in all of our projects and asked a number of relevant questions. He also emphasised the importance of our work and its positive impact on the development of new technologies and on the Australian community as a whole. We were very happy to have had such an insightful and enjoyable meeting with the political leader of our country.”

The CNBP team are already looking forward to next year’s event!

Nanoparticles, velcro, marbles and a hot glue gun

CNBPat Questacon SciComm event Dec 2014-2

16 December 2014 :Science Communication workshop.
“If you can’t explain it simply, you don’t understand it well enough.” – Albert Einstein.

On December 15-16th, 9 CNBP ECRs from University of Adelaide,  RMIT University, Macquarie University and SAHMRI attended a science communication workshop at the Questacon workshop (Canberra) and were taught the importance of translating their research into lay terms. More specifically, explaining concepts such as the use of nanoparticles for targeted drug therapy to an 8 year old. Its harder than you think and involves the art of scaffolding; i.e. simplifying a concept by using analogies.

The most interactive and fun session of the workshop involved us creating models and physical demonstrations of our research and included us all running around the Questacon workshop to explain current, throwing paper at people as a demonstration of drug delivery, different coloured glow sticks as an analogy for the use of nanoparticles/probes to diagnose pain and the use of lots and lots of velcro and hot glue guns to make “up-scaled” nanoparticles. Think Playschool for scientists.

CNBP were proud to be sponsors of this professional development workshop which was developed by The ARC Centre of Excellence for Electromaterials Science, in partnership with the ARC Centre of Excellence in Convergent Bio-Nano Science and Technology and the ARC Centre of Excellence in Nanoscale BioPhotonics.

The workshop was designed to teach participants how to put their best foot forward in media interviews, community talks and scientific presentations.