Tag Archives: Peipei Jia

Gold nanomembranes with nanoholes

1 February 2019:

In a break-through in the field of nano membrane related research, CNBP alumni scientist Dr Peipei Jia and colleagues report on the development of large-area freestanding gold nanomembranes with nanohole arrays fabricated using a replication-releasing procedure. More information available below!

Journal: Materials Horizons.

Publication title:  Large-area Freestanding Gold Nanomembranes with Nanoholes.

Authors: Peipei Jia, Kamil Zuber, Qiuquan Guo, Brant C. Gibson, Jun Yang and Heike Ebendorff-Heidepriem.

Abstract: Thin metal films with nanohole arrays have opened up new opportunities in applications ranging from plasmonics to optoelectronics. However, their dependence on substrates limits not only their performance but also other application possibilities. A key challenge to overcome this limitation is to make these nanostructured films substrate-free. Here we report large-area freestanding gold nanomembranes with nanohole arrays fabricated using a replication-releasing procedure. The structures maintain spatial uniformity and pristine quality after release across the entire membrane up to 75 cm2 in area and as thin as 50 nm. The freestanding nanomembranes show significantly enhanced optical transmission and effective field extension compared to the same nanomembranes on substrates. A plasmonic coupling resonance with a 2.7 nm linewidth achieves a record figure-of-merit of 240 for refractive index sensing. The gold nanomembranes can be geometrically converted to 3D microstructures by ion-irradiation-based kirigami technique. The transformed micro-objects can be precisely controlled via geometry design and strategic cutting. Furthermore, we find the presence of nanoholes can significantly change the in-plane modulus of the gold nanomembranes. Finally, the freestanding gold nanomembranes can be transferred to non-planar substrates, enabling their future integration with advanced optical and electronic systems for emerging applications.

Cambridge visit furthers research

10 August 2017:

After successfully receiving an ANN Overseas Travel Fellowship, CNBP researcher Dr Peipei Jia has arrived back at the University of Adelaide after a two month visit to the MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology (LMB) in Cambridge, UK.

While there, Peipei had the opportunity to test both techniques and potential application for his work on the fabrication of large-area freestanding gold nanomembranes.

More specifically, tests undertaken while at Cambridge showed that the gold membrane had the size, quality and robustness  for the critical application of resolving molecular structures in Cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM).

Work continues but the nanophotonics structure is expected to have significant impact on both structural biology and electron microscopy.

Quasiperiodic nanohole arrays on optical fibers as plasmonic sensors

Peipei-Jia_low_sq10 August 2016:

The latest paper published by CNBP scientists demonstrates the quasiperiodic nanohole array based optical fiber as a high-performance plasmonic sensor.

Journal: ACS Sensors.

Publication title: Quasiperiodic Nanohole Arrays on Optical Fibers as Plasmonic Sensors: Fabrication and Sensitivity Determination.

Authors: Peipei Jia (pictured top left), Zhaoliang Yang, Jun Yang and Heike Ebendorff-Heidepriem.

Abstract: Surface plasmon resonance enhanced optical transmission has been observed in periodic nanohole arrays and plenty of plasmonic applications from label-free biosensing to surface-enhanced spectroscopies on various platforms have been found. Recently this effect has also been demonstrated for nanohole arrays with quasiperiodic patterns such as the Penrose tiling. Here we pattern and transfer quasiperiodic nanohole arrays onto optical fibers and investigate their optical performance in refractive index sensing. These quasiperiodic arrays show multiple resonances closely related to their geometric features. The resonances are narrow and sensitive to the dielectric changes on the probe surface due to our high quality fabrication. We find the measured sensitivity of our quasiperiodic nanohole arrays is as high as that of periodic nanohole arrays and reaches the theoretical sensitivity limit as predicted by our universal sensitivity analysis. This result in turn verifies our sensitivity theory on propagating surface plasmon resonance in a wider range beyond periodic nanostructure arrays. Our study demonstrates the quasiperiodic nanohole array based optical fiber is a high-performance plasmonic sensor.

The paper is available online.

Adelaide node welcomes new research fellows

NeuroFebruary 2015: Welcome:

CNBP Adelaide Node are pleased to welcome new CNBP Research Fellow commencing in January/February 2015.

  • Jenny Butler who is joined the Recognise theme on January 28th
  • Peipei Jia who joined the Measure and Illuminate theme on January 31st
  • Xiaozhou (Michelle) Zhang who joined the Recognise theme on February 9
  • John Horsley who joined the Recognise theme on February 9