Tag Archives: Outreach

Centre outreach encourages a career in science

18 April 2018:

Two fantastic sessions of outreach in two days by CNBP Associate Investigator Dr Annemarie Nadort saw 100 Year 11 and Year 12 students learn about biophotonics, blood cells and the skills required to create medical devices that benefit society.

The sessions took place at Macquarie University and were part of a highly successful initiative aimed at encouraging students to undertake higher education learning and potentially develop a career in science.

During the outreach sessions, Dr Annemarie Nadort provided the students with a brief overview of light-based imaging and how it could be best applied to examine blood inside the body. Students were then presented with a real-life case-study on the development of a clinical microcirculation imager. A hands-on demonstration of the device then took place, followed by an interactive group discussion on how the device could be potentially improved with future development. Students were then left with the message that there were many opportunities open to them across the scientific and technology disciplines,  and that they should study in those areas that they were most enthusiastic about.

“I was extremely impressed as to how engaged these students were,” said Dr Annemarie Nadort. “They provided some great answers during the group discussion stage of the session and had really thought through issues and potential solutions. I could see the keenness for science and technology in the room and hopefully my sessions added to that keenness and passion for science. I’d love to see some of these students become the researchers of the future, developing their own fantastic new medical devices over the years and decades to come.”

Below: Dr Annemarie Nadort communicating the wonders of science to high school students and explaining what it takes to become a successful academic research scientist.

New CNBP Outreach Chair announced

28 February 2018:

CNBP welcomes Dr Melanie Bagg, Director of Communications and Outreach, Australian Academy of Science as the new Chair of its Education and Outreach Advisory Committee.

The Committee provides guidance to the CNBP in marketing, public relations, communications and outreach with Melanie a PhD qualified medical research scientist and professional science communicator.

In this role, Melanie will bring her extensive knowledge of science communications and engagement strategies to the Centre. This includes prior experience gained as Manager of Business Development, Australian Science Media Centre (AusSMC) as well as various senior marketing and outreach roles at the University of Adelaide.

As Chair of the CNBP Education and Outreach Committee, Melanie will also be welcomed as a member of the CNBP Advisory Board. This high level Advisory group advises on the strategic directions for the Centre and monitors delivery of organisational outcomes.

“I’m extremely excited to be able to help CNBP continue its great work in communicating its scientific outcomes to a wide range of stakeholders including school students, the general public and media,” she said.

“The research coming out of the Centre is simply fantastic and I look forward to being involved in such an exciting and interdisciplinary scientific space.”

Below – Melanie Bagg joins Team CNBP. L to R – Kathy Nicholson (CNBP Chief Operating Officer), Melanie Bagg (Outreach Committee Chair), Prof Mark Hutchinson (CNBP Director) and Catriona Jackson (Advisory Board Chair).

Concordia College students visit CNBP

6 November 2017:

Thirty-one Year 11 students from Concordia College visited CNBP headquarters at the University of Adelaide, 6th November 2017, further strengthening outreach engagement and linkages between the school and Centre researchers.

The students, part of the  International Baccalaureate Science program, enjoyed presentations from CNBP researchers, participated in a Q&A regarding CNBP science, and undertook lab tours with Dr Jiawen Li who did a show and tell with Miniprobes technology. Students were then able to get hands-on with the mini-probe, experimenting with its capabilities on pieces of fruit which mimicked potential use on the human body.

As part of the outreach session – CNBP’s Dr Kyle Dunning talked about her research and its focus on reproductive health, Patrick Capon and Aimee Horsfall presented chemistry and its use in CNBP sensing technology and Dr Georgios Tsiminis  talked about his own physics journey and the sensing work that he is now working on in the meat and dairy space.

Feedback from Joanne Rogers, Head of Science at Concordia College, noted that she thought this outreach session was, “The best yet with CNBP.”

Below – photos from the visit.

 

Ecolinc STEM program

16 October 2017:

Centre Associate Investigator, Dr Kate Fox from RMIT University has participated in the Ecolinc STEM for Women program in Melbourne, Oct 16th, 2017.

Ninety students (Years 9 and 10) attended the event where they  got to learn of the experiences from a range of women who work in a variety of STEM related areas. They also heard from education providers about potential career pathways in STEM and listened to the career journeys of successful women in science.

The students were from Upper Yarra, St Albans, Dandenong, Southern Cross Grammar, Bacchus Marsh, Overnewton College, Highview College, Bellarine and Whittlesea.

 

CNBP at AstroLight Festival

23 September 2017:

CNBP scientists joined forces with astronauts, astronomers, scientists, stargazers and artists to present a night starring astronomy and light at the annual AstroLight Festival, held at Scienceworks in Melbourne, Saturday 23 September, 2017.

The public event, which attracted more than 1,500 attendees, saw eleven CNBP team members involved – giving talks, undertaking light-focused science demonstrations and hosting an interactive stall.

Specific talks included:

  • Science Fiction Science Fact – Laser Combat in Movies  from A/Prof Brant Gibson, CNBP node leader at RMIT
  • The Spark of Life – Dr Hannah Brown, CNBP Fellow from the University of Adelaide
  • Fluorescent Proteins – From Nature to the Lab from CNBP PhD student  Emma Wilson

Event feedback from A/Prof Gibson was extremely positive. “There was plenty of interest in our light-based CNBP science and some great questions from the public both young and old. The team really pulled together to make our participation such a success – both on the night and in the lead up activity, and with the development of the displays and demonstrations.”

Below – The CNBP team ready to do outreach!

Concordia students visit CNBP labs

14 September 2017:

Eighty Concordia College students with an interest in STEM undertook a series of educational tours at CNBP laboratories at the University of Adelaide—forty students visiting Wednesday 6th September and a further forty students visiting Wednesday 13th September, 2017.

The students were hosted by a number of CNBP researchers, undertaking laboratory tours in both the Braggs and Health and Medical Sciences buildings.

As well as getting an introduction to CNBP and biophotonic related science, the students were shown a range of CNBP activity and work-spaces. This included demonstrations of advanced needle probes and optical imaging systems, hands-on demonstrations of near-infrared light scanners, use of a 3D metal printer and tours of the Centre’s glass and optical fibre fabrication facilities, as well as tours of the  embryology laboratory where embryo culture and cryopreservation techniques were also able to be shown.

Emily Johnson, Middle Years Programme Coordinator from Concordia College noted, “All of the students (and teachers) really enjoyed the sessions. They came back quite buzzing and extremely interested in what they saw.”

Feedback from the CNBP researchers was also extremely positive with many noting the excellent questions posed by the students during the lab tour demonstrations and activity.

CNBP science at the Calyx

12 September 2017:

CNBP researchers Dr Denitza Denkova and Dr Martin Ploschner took their luminescence and fluorescence science expertise to the general public, at a special after-hours event known as ‘Science at the Calyx’ at the Royal Botanic Garden in Sydney.

Presenting to an audience of approximately sixty people, the CNBP scientists focused on giving members of the public information about the origins of luminescence and examples of it being used – from everyday life to medical applications, and the amazing natural phenomenon of bioluminescence which can be found in plants, animals and fungi.

Following the hour long talk, there were demonstrations including the use of fluorescent bubbles, a ‘magical’ fluorescent screen, the showing of several fluorescent specimens and an examination of fluorescence in money and documents for security purposes. There was also as ample time for attendees to talk to the researchers about their work with fluorescent molecules and nanoparticles.

According to Dr Denkova, the event was highly rewarding.

“There was plenty of opportunity for personal interaction which was embraced by attendees. Many had an interest in the medical applications related to fluorescence, but there were also great questions on practical everyday activities – such as how to paint bikes with fluorescent paint to help improve road safety. Following the talk, people had the chance to walk around the beautiful garden with a UV torch in their hand to discover for themselves which plants are fluorescent. Both Martin and myself enjoyed communicating our science to a wider public!”

School tour of Braggs labs

31 August 2017:

Caritas College students visiting the University of Adelaide for a ‘science day’ were shown around laboratory spaces in the Braggs Building by CNBP PHD students Kathryn Palasis (pictured) and Georgina Sylvia.

The 23 Year 9 school students were given a tour through a synthetic chemistry lab and then spoke with both CNBP researchers about the work being done and their journeys through University. This was followed by a further tour through a fibre-optics laboratory.

According to Kathryn, “The students seemed engaged and interested, particularly with the fibre-optics tour. And feedback from Amy (who organised the day) was that the students enjoyed it and that the teachers were very appreciative. Personally I spoke to a girl who said she was interested in studying science at university which was very pleasing to hear, and hopefully we encouraged others to see it as an appealing career path as well.”