Tag Archives: OralPres

‘Ingenuity’ promotes STEM study

23 October 2018:

‘Ingenuity’, a public facing event run by the Faculty of Engineering, Computer and Mathematical Sciences (University of Adelaide) was recently held at the Adelaide Convention Centre and CNBP science was represented!

The University event, showcasing final year student projects and achievements, was attended by thousands of school students, industry representatives and members of the general public, with the goal of encouraging and fostering an ongoing interest in STEM related subject areas (science, technology, engineering and maths).

This year saw CNBP PhD student Kathryn Palasis participate at the event, giving two presentations to approximately 300 school students on her research (the design and development of photoswitchable drugs) and describing her time at the University, with the aim of encouraging students to pursue a career in STEM.

“It was fantastic seeing the energy and interest in the room,” said Miss Palasis. “The feedback from staff and students was extremely positive and it was great to share my research and scientific passion with them all.”

“Hopefully we’ll see some of these young scientists studying at the University and then showcasing their own exciting areas of research in the years to come,” she said.

Below –  CNBP PhD student Kathryn Palasis delivers her talk.

 

CNBP participates in LEA outreach event

7 June 2017:

With a focus on STEM learning and the need for innovative outreach approaches, Learning Environments Australia (SA chapter) have coordinated a forum at the University of Adelaide, 7 June 2017, which saw significant support from the CNBP.

Prof Mark Hutchinson (CNBP Director), Tony Crawshaw (CNBP Communications and Outreach Coordinator) and Dr Sabrina Heng (CNBP Researcher, pictured) all participated in the LEA forum, providing talks and answering questions as to the Centre’s successful approach to engaging with schools and students and inspiring the next generation of young scientist.

Joanne Rogers, Head of Science, Concordia College who has been closely involved with CNBP outreach activity, talked about the real life changes experienced by her students, resulting from engagement with CNBP scientists. Students she said, had picked up additional science subjects on the back of CNBP school and laboratory visits.

Other University of Adelaide presenters at the event included Kiri Hagenus, Director, Children’s University; Dr Claudia Szabo, Associate Dean, Faculty of ECMS – MOOC in digital literacy for teachers; and Science’s Prof Bob Hill, who discussed successful Faculty outreach initiatives.

China visit by Centre researcher

16 May 2017:

On a recent trip to China, CNBP Research Fellow A/Prof Guozhen Liu undertook a number of visits and talks, discussing her advanced sensing, nano-particle and bio-imaging work. This included:

5 May-8 May: Attendance at the International Congress on Analytical Sciences 2017 (ICAS2017) at Kaikou, China. Here Guozhen gave an oral presentation with the title “Engineering reduced graphen oxides towards a label-free electrochemical immunosensor for detection of tumor necrosis factor-alpha.”

11 May: Guozhen gave an invited talk titled, “Nanotools for cytokine monitoring in neuroscience” at Prof Zhihong Zhang’s research team at Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan. Prof Zhang is one of CNBP’s Partner Investigators at HUST.

13-14 May: Guozhen provided a keynote speech, titled, “An optical fibre based ex-vivo device for detection of cytokines” at the 2nd International Congress on Biomedical Imaging and Signal Processing (ICBISP 2017) at Wuhan.

Below: A/Prof Guozhen Liu (right) visiting CNBP Partner Investigator Prof Zhihong Zhang.

 

Goldys gives public talk on cell colour

Ewa Goldys Low Res Edit 01594 October 2016:

CNBP Deputy Director Prof Ewa Goldys gave a colourful and illuminating public talk at Macquarie University today, discussing a pioneering hyperspectral imaging technique that is helping researchers better understand the composition of cells, right down at a molecular level.

The talk, entitled, ‘A Eureka Moment for Cell Colour Technology’, explored the use of colour information to differentiate between cells – applying photonics to biology.

Goldys believes that this next-generation methodology offers a new window to non-invasively and rapidly detect major health conditions including neurodegeneration, cancer and diabetes.

The research won Goldys and her colleague Martin Gosnell, the 2016 ANSTO Eureka Prize for Innovative Use of Technology.

Below: Ewa Goldys presenting her work on the fluorescent colour signatures of living cells and tissues, using big data techniques and innovative computing technology .

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Lindsay Parker at SPIE 2016

lindsay_parker-low-rez-web115 February 2016:

Lindsay Parker, CNBP researcher, has presented her work at the SPIE Photonics West Conference, San Francisco, 2016.

The conference is one of the largest Biomedical Optics & Photonics Conferences in the world.

Lindsay’s paper was titled, “Fluorescent nanodiamond and lanthanide labelled in situ hybridization for the identification of RNA transcripts in fixed and CLARITY-cleared central nervous system tissues” and was selected by the chairs of the  “Neural Imaging and Sensing” portion of the conference.

Further information on the conference is available online.

 

Alf Garcia-Bennett at IMMS-9

Alfonso Garcia-Bennett (2)20 August 2015:

Alf Garcia-Bennett, CNBP Research Fellow, has given an oral presentation at the 9th International Mesostructured Materials Symposium (IMMS-9) with an abstract titled “.”

The event, at the Brisbane Convention & Exhibition Centre, facilitated discussion on progress and perspectives, fundamental challenges for synthesis chemistry, and industrial applications of mesostructured materials. Approximately 350 participants, 200 posters and about 10 exhibitors featured at the conference.

For more information, please refer to the conference website: www.imms9.org.

ABSTRACT:

In recent years new approaches to the synthesis of mesoporous materials have been developed focusing on the use of non-surfactant templates that can offer new functions within the mesoporous produced without the need to eliminate the pore forming agent. Such functions may include the use of pharmaceutically active compounds as pore forming agents or the use of chiral compounds to transcribe a chiral surface within the pores. Furthermore, avoiding the need to remove the pore template by calcination has both environmental and economic consequences.

Recently we reported the synthesis of mesoporous material NGM-1 nanoporous guanosine material-1) which is prepared through the use of supramolecular template guanosine monophosphate (GMP), a nucleotide monomer in messenger RNA. The supramolecular assembly of GMP occurs via the formation of G4-quartets, hydrogen bonded species that supported via pi-stacking interactions form chiral hexagonal columnar species. These are stabilized via the  formation of cations (cations (Na+, K+, Rb+, Sr2+) which may direct the formation of various supramolecular structures.

The synthesis and structural properties of a variety of GMP template materials will be reported, highlighting the effects that the pore template has on the pore surface. Evidence based on a variety of techniques including X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy and circular dichroism as well as other spectroscopic methods will be utilized in order to show the chiral transcription of the template within the pores of the ordered mesoporous materials produced.

CNBP researchers visit IPHT Jena

IPHT visit13 July 2015:

From the 28th of June to the 3rd of July, Dr Georgios Tsiminis and Dr Erik Schartner from the Adelaide node of the CNBP visited the Institute of Photonic Technology (IPHT) in Jena, Germany, as part of a longer trip that also included oral presentations at the CLEO Europe 2015 International Conference and company visits throughout Germany.

The two CNBP members gave a seminar to the Fiber Optics work on their recent work on comparing different fluorescence optical fibre sensors (Dr Tsiminis) and on optical fibre thermometry for in vivo applications (Dr Schartner), followed by a lab tour of the IPHT fibre fabrication facility and measurement laboratories. They also met up with another CNBP researcher, Dr Herbert Foo, who is on a long-term visit in Jena working on advanced glass-making.

The rest of this long-term visit was spent working at the laboratory of Prof. Dr Juergen Popp, IPHT, a world-renowned expert of Raman spectroscopy for sensing applications. Dr Tsiminis and Dr Schartner worked with with Dr Christian Matthaeus and Dr Sebastian Dochow from the Raman group. Their work involved gaining hands-on experience with some of the optical fibre Raman probes developed within the group and their deployment for in vivo and ex vivo measurements.

Initial experiments were conducted in bacon cuts, highlighting the difference between fat tissue and red meat in terms of their respective Raman spectra, with fat tissue showing the typical lipid Raman signature that was absent in the collagen-rich red meat part of the sample.

Further experiments were then performed inside a sample of rabbit aorta (preserved in formalin) that enabled the monitoring of fat concentration along the length of the aorta, allowing the pinpointing of areas were fat accumulates inside the blood vessel and therefore locations of possible blood narrowing, a big concern for heart disease.

The CNBP researchers also visited the Schott Glas Museum and got an overview of the early stages of high quality and precision glass making, as well as the Optischen Museum Jena, featuring the history of optic technologies through the ages.

Overall this was a very successful and enjoyeable visit to IPHT in Jena that produced the first parts of shared work and expertise with the CNBP collaborators led by Prof. Dr Juergen Popp. This initial work and fruitful discussions set the base for a future collaborative work project on using Raman spectroscopy to monitor cardiovascular health and we look forward to welcoming some of our IPHT colleagues at the CNBP retreat in November.

Image: Researchers in front of the IPHT building in Jena, Germany. From left to right: Dr Georgios Tsiminis (CNBP), Dr Herbert Foo (CNBP), Dr Erik Schartner (CNBP), Dr Stephen Warren-Smith (IPHT), Prof. Dr Hartmut Bartelt (IPHT) and Dr Linh Nguyen (IPAS).

CNBP at International Nanomedicine Conference

cnbplogosquare18 July 2015:

CNBP was certainly well represented at the 6th Annual International Nanomedicine Conference, at Sydney’s Coogee Beach, July 6-8, 2015.

Targeting both researchers and clinicians, the conference saw a large number of CNBP personnel in attendance, with oral and poster presentations undertaken by the following CNBP researchers –

Oral Presentations
Dr. Andrew Care – Building a platform technology for the self-assembly of functional upconversion nanoparticles

Prof. Ewa Goldys – Nanorubies For Ultrasensitive Biomolecular Imaging

Dr. Guozhen Liu – Covalent Functionalization of Gold Nanoparticles as Electronic Bridges and Signal Amplifiers Towards an Electrochemical Immunosensor for Botulinum Neurotoxin Type A

Dr. Annemarie Nadort – Blood circulation of nanoparticles in a chick embryo model

Poster Presentations
Mrs. Sandhya Clement – X-ray induced singlet oxygen generation by nanoparticle-photosensitizer conjugates: direct determination of singlet oxygen quantum yield

Dr. Varun Sreenivasan – Large scale production, characterisation and functionalisation of nanorubies

Dr. Kai Zhang – Study on Porous Silica Nanoparticles to co-Delivery of Drug and siRNA

Further information on the conference, attendees and abstacts can be found from the event web site – http://www.oznanomed.org/

Roman Kostecki at ICMAT2015

Roman Kostecki28 June 2015:

CNBP researcher Roman Kostecki presented his latest research paper at the 8th International Conference on Materials for Advanced Technologies (ICMAT2015). The conference, twinned with the 4th Photonics Global Conference took place in Singapore 28 June – 3 July 2015.

The paper, titled “Thin-film Polymer Functionalization of Optical Fiber Enabling Multiligand Chemosensing” was published with an author list consisting of Roman KOSTECKI, Sabrina HENG, Heike EBENDORFF-HEIDEPRIEM, Andrew ABELL, and Tanya MONRO.

Abstract:

Silica exposed-core microstructured optical fibers (EC-MOFs) are a platform for distributed, in situ, and/or remote sensors based on fluorescence. The portion of light guided outside of the glass core, often described as ‘evanescent field’, is affected by the refractive index and absorption characteristics of the surrounding medium. This light-matter overlap provides opportunities for fluorometric measurements of the composition and concentration of an analyte along the fiber length. Functionalizing the core with a chemosensor removes the need for chemosensor/analyte premixing. Detection of aluminum cations (Al) is of particular interest as a means to monitor corrosion, human health and the environment.

We demonstrate the first example of a photo-switchable chemosensor for Al detection using a modified photochromic spiropyran (SP-I), which is appended to an ionophore for cation binding. Photochemical switching of the spiropyran allows ion binding to be switched on and off, creating a multiple use chemosensor. The SP-I sensor binds Al or calcium cations as multi- or single-ligand complexes respectively, and was modified for surface attachment. Silane- or polyelectrolyte-based methodology allows subsequent attachment of the SP-I to a glass surface. Studies with the dual ion binding SP-I integrated with the EC-MOF sensing platform provide evidence that covalent attachment is ineffective, where multiligand binding chemosensors are needed. Functionalizing EC-MOFs with a thin-film (50 nm) polymer doped with SP-I demonstrates capacity to use both multi- and single-ligand binding chemosensors. This demonstrates that the integration of photo-switchable chemosensor, thin-film polymer, and silica optical fiber elements creates a sensor capable of multiligand chemosensing anywhere along the fiber’s length. The work demonstrates a new pathway to next generation reusable and continuous operation ion sensing platforms, and that the local molecular environment of a chemosensor affects its function which can be used to control how metal ions interact with chemosensors.