Tag Archives: Nicki Packer

Understanding the role that sugars play

30 March 2018:

CNBP scientists Chris Ashwood (pictured) and Prof Nicki Packer at Macquarie University have shown that sugars with exactly the same chemical composition but slightly different structure break apart differently in their latest publication in the area of mass spectrometry. This work is their first step in automating sugar analysis, to understand the role sugars play in human disease.

Journal: Journal of The American Society for Mass Spectrometry.

Publication title: Discrimination of Isomers of Released N- and O-Glycans Using Diagnostic Product Ions in Negative Ion PGC-LC-ESI-MS/MS.

Authors: Christopher Ashwood, Chi-Hung Lin, Morten Thaysen-Andersen, Nicolle H. Packer.

Abstract:
Profiling cellular protein glycosylation is challenging due to the presence of highly similar glycan structures that play diverse roles in cellular physiology. As the anomericity and the exact linkage type of a single glycosidic bond can influence glycan function, there is a demand for improved and automated methods to confirm detailed structural features and to discriminate between structurally similar isomers, overcoming a significant bottleneck in the analysis of data generated by glycomics experiments. We used porous graphitized carbon-LC-ESI-MS/MS to separate and detect released N- and O-glycan isomers from mammalian model glycoproteins using negative mode resonance activation CID-MS/MS. By interrogating similar fragment spectra from closely related glycan isomers that differ only in arm position and sialyl linkage, product fragment ions for discrimination between these features were discovered. Using the Skyline software, at least two diagnostic fragment ions of high specificity were validated for automated discrimination of sialylation and arm position in N-glycan structures, and sialylation in O-glycan structures, complementing existing structural diagnostic ions. These diagnostic ions were shown to be useful for isomer discrimination using both linear and 3D ion trap mass spectrometers when analyzing complex glycan mixtures from cell lysates. Skyline was found to serve as a useful tool for automated assessment of glycan isomer discrimination. This platform-independent workflow can potentially be extended to automate the characterization and quantitation of other challenging glycan isomers.

Nanotechnology meets bioengineering

29 June 2017:

The Fudan-UH-MQ Workshop on ‘Nanotechnology meets Bioengineering’ was well supported by CNBP researchers at Macquarie University,  Wed 28th June – Thu 29th June.

A joint workshop, organised within the framework of University wide trilateral collaboration between Fudan, Hamburg and Macquarie, the event aimed to enhance collaborations between all three universities as well as generate potential cotutelle PhD candidates.

CNBP researchers presenting at the workshop included:

Prof. Nicolle H. Packer (CNBP Chief Investigator, pictured)
Cellular glycosylation: opportunities for discovering new molecular targets.

A/Prof. Anwar Sunna (CNBP Associate Investigator)
A platform technology for the self assembly of functional materials.

A/Prof. Guozhen Liu (CNBP Associate Investigator)
Nanotools for in vivo cytokine monitoring in neuroscience.

Dr. Nicole Cordina (CNBP Research Fellow)
Functionalisation of fluorescent nanodiamonds for bio-imaging applications.

Below: Prof. Nicolle Packer presents her talk on glycans.

Guest lecture at ARMI

Nicki Packer Low Res Edit 012517 February 2016:

Prof. Nicolle Packer, CNBP Chief Investigator, has today given a guest lecture at the Australian Regenerative Medicine Institute (ARMI). The medical research centre is based at the Clayton Campus of Monash University, Melbourne.

Prof. Packer’s talk was titled, “Integrating technologies to make discoveries in glycobiology.”

Further information on the ARMI and its contributions to regenerative medicine and stem cell research can be found online.

MCP award from the Society for Glycobiology

Nicki Packer Low Res Edit 01252 December 2015:

Nicki Packer, CNBP Chief Investigator, has been awarded the 2015 Molecular and Cellular Proteomics award by the Society for Glycobiology. The award, sponsored at the annual SfG conference by the American Society for Biochemistry & Molecular Biology (ASBMB) since 2013, is given to an individual whose accomplishments best represent the ideals of the research fields covered by the journal.

The MCP award came with financial support to attend the 2015 SfG conference, which was held Dec. 1-4 in San Francisco.

Also undertaken by Nicki at the conference was an invited talk, titled ‘Integrating technologies to make discoveries in glycobiology.’

CNBP CI wins excellence award

Nicki Packer Low Res Edit 01254 November 2015:

CNBP CI Nicki Packer has been recognised for her world leading achievements at Macquarie University, winning the  2015 Award for Excellence in Research – Innovative Technologies.

Professor Packer and her team have been acknowledged as one of the first research groups in the world to link glycomics to the proteomics and genomics revolution in biological research.

Further information on Nicki’s research and her Macquarie University award can be found online here.

CNBP CI at HUPO 2015

Nicki Packer Low Res Edit 012528 September 2015:

Chief Investigator at the CNBP, Nicki Packer, attended the 14th Human Proteome Organization World Congress (HUPO 2015), held September 27 – 30, 2015 in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada.

She was organiser and Chair of the ‘Glycomics and Glycoproteomics’ session and also gave an invited talk, “Glycomics-assisted glycoproteomics: deciphering the complexity.”

Further information on HUPO 2015 is available online.

Imaging talk at Chemical Proteomics Symposium

Nicki Packer Low Res Edit 012517 July 2015:

CNBP Chief Investigator Nicki Packer gave an invited national talk at the 2nd Chemical Proteomics Symposium, held at the Children’s Medical Research Institute (CMRI) in Sydney, Australia.

Her talk was titled, “MALDI imaging mass spectrometry of N-linked glycans on formalin-fixed tissue: differentiating tissue types.”

Further symposium information is available here.