Tag Archives: National

CNBP at ‘Science meets Parliament’

15 February 2018:

Four CNBP’ers attended ‘Science meets Parliament (SmP)’, a high profile political engagement STA event held in Canberra, 13-14th February, 2018.

The event gives science, technology, engineering and mathematics professionals the chance to build a profile for their important work in the Parliamentary environment. This includes meeting privately with politicians to discuss areas of research expertise, as well as unique professional development opportunities focused on clarifying competing rationalities of science, politics and public policy.

The four attendees were CNBP Chief Operating Officer Kathy Nicholson, CNBP PhD student Emma Wilson from RMIT University, CNBP researcher Dr Lindsay Parker (representing Macquarie University) and Dr Sanam Mustafa (The University of Adelaide and a Superstar of STEM, Afternoon Chair on Day One of the event).

Feedback from all representatives was extremely positive with all gaining from their SmP experience.

Emma Wilson met with Western Australian Senator Slade Brockman for her Parliamentarian meeting.

“I told him about my work exploring fluorescent nanodiamonds so we can develop them as tiny light beacons to see what is happening inside our cells,” she said.

“I explained that the CNBP has created an environment where I can explore the fundamentals of the material with an application in mind.”

A major highlight for Emma was getting to meet some of her STEM heroes.

“I had a chat with Australian of the Year Professor Michelle Simmons,” she said.

“We discussed gender balance and equity and the importance of having quality mentorship for creating better scientists. We also discussed the inflexibility of institutes when it comes to accommodating people, both men and women, with carer roles.”

CNBP’s Dr Lindsay Parker was enthusiastic about the SmP event too.

“I met with MP Karen Andrews, who has been a member of the House of Representatives since 2010, representing the Division of McPherson in Queensland,” she said.

“Karen is the Assistant Minister for Vocational Education and Skills and also a co-chair of The Parliamentary Friends of Science. I explained to her how small the nanoscale is relative to things such as human hair and bacteria. I also mentioned some of the materials we work with in the Centre such as nanodiamonds, how they are fluorescent and why they are excellent nanoprobes for use in neuro-imaging.”

Lindsay continued, “I sat next to MP Craig Kelly at the Gala dinner – he’s in the House of Representatives for Hughes, New South Wales. I spoke to him about my neuroscience research and how hopefully one day we can better engineer anti-inflammatory drugs to target the correct cells with less side effects during chronic pain and Alzheimer’s. I mentioned how CNBP is an excellent multidisciplinary Centre linking biology, chemistry and physics. He asked questions about how the drugs work and when they would be ready for use in humans.”

Lindsay summed up, “All of the politicians, CEOs and organisation heads at SmP clearly recognised the need to continue to promote and improve opportunities for women in STEM industries. Senator Michaelia Cash gave a particularly inspirational and enthusiastic speech about this at the Gala dinner and I was impressed that both she and my matched MP Karen Andrews were genuinely interested in science research and improving STEM promotion as a great career in Australia.”

Below: CNBP’s Dr Lindsay Parker, COO Kathy Nicholson, Emma Wilson and Dr Sanam Mustafa at ‘Science meets Parliament’.

 

 

 

 

CNBP at ‘Science meets Business’

9 November 2017:

As silver sponsor at the annual STA ‘Science meets Business’ event held in Sydney, November 9th 2017, CNBP was extremely well represented, supporting a push to improve engagement and collaboration between the research sector and Australian industry.

In addition to having numerous Centre scientists in attendance – those with a strong interest and focus on commercialisation and translation of research, CNBP also had  senior personnel speak and present in a variety of capacities.

This included CNBP Director Prof Mark Hutchinson (pictured top left), who together with  Andrew Grant (Availer) discussed CNBP’s commercialisation success and the taking of ideas from ‘boom to the showroom.’  Deep dive (idea creation), value-add solutions, solving pain points and interesting new jobs were all touched upon in a quick fire exchange of views.

Additionally, Centre Investigator and Miniprobes founder Prof Robert McLaughlin participated in the ‘soapbox sesssion’ where three competitively-selected ‘soapbox leaders’ made compelling pitches, sparking robust discussion as they quizzed delegates for perspectives on new ideas to create useful collaboration.

“It was great to be at this years ‘Science meets Business’, bringing CNBP science and innovation to industry and learnings back again,” concluded Prof Hutchinson. “I look forward to hearing about other successful collaborations at next year’s STA event.”

Below – CNBP Investigator and founder of Miniprobes Prof Robert McLaughlin pitches his smart needle to a science/business audience.

 

 

CI joins ARC College of Experts

27 October 2017:

Professor Andrew Greentree, CNBP Chief Investigator from RMIT University has been announced as a member of the prestigious ARC College of Experts.

Members of the College of Experts assess and rank ARC grant applications submitted under the National Competitive Grants Program, make funding recommendations to the ARC and provide strategic advice to the ARC on emerging disciplines and cross-disciplinary developments.

Membership of the College is limited to experts of international standing drawn from the Australian research community.

Further information on this key ARC committee and its contribution to national innovation is available online.

 

Centre AI awarded prestigious Malcolm McIntosh Prize

18 October 2017:

CNBP Associate Investigator Professor Dayong Jin, at the University of Technology Sydney, has been awarded the Malcolm McIntosh Prize for Physical Scientist of the Year.

The award recognises Professor Jin’s innovative work with nanocrystals which allow for enhanced molecular imaging deep within the cellular environment, aiding early stage detection of cancer and disease.

The Prize, part of the ‘Prime Minister’s Prizes for Science’ series, are awarded annually and are a public recognition and tribute to the contributions that scientists, innovators and science teachers are making to Australia’s current and future scientific and commercialisation capabilities.

Full award details as well as a video and summary of Professor Jin’s work is available from the Australian Government web site.

CNBP at ‘Science meets Policymakers’

8 August 2017:

CNBP was well represented at the STA ‘Science meets Policymakers’ event held in Canberra, August 8, 2017.

Researchers A/Prof Guozhen Liu, Dr Alf Garcia-Bennett, Dr Sanam Mustafa and Dr Hannah Brown all attended and heard a number of talks on topics ranging from ‘A Whole Government approach to Science Policy’, to ‘A Crash-course in STEM and Policy Making’ through to discussion on ‘Positive and Meaningful Contributions to Policy.’

A/Prof Guozhen Liu particularly enjoyed the ‘Working Round Table’ discussion. “We discussed the 2030 Strategic Plan for the Australian Innovation, Science and Research System, which will help shape future science activity in Australia. It was emphasized that Australia encourages both fundamental and applied research, and that research excellence is key.”

A/Prof Liu also noted the importance of effective communication between stakeholders. “Methods and approaches to drive effective and engaged connections between Universities, Government and Industry were topics that were explored and discussed in depth throughout the day.”

The ‘Science meets Policymakers’ event brought together researchers and practitioners from a range of science and technology disciplines, with policymakers from across government departments and agencies. Objectives included to make connections and to examine the intersection between the evidence base and actual policy development.

Rethinking food and nutrition science

1 June 2017:

CNBP Research Fellow Dr Philipp Reineck has been selected as a delegate for the ‘Theo Murphy High Flyers Think Tank’, a national group established by The Australian Academy of Science.

The Think Tank will bring together early and mid-career researchers exploring nutrition science in an interdisciplinary fashion.

Findings will contribute to the development of a long term strategic planning process for nutrition research in Australia.

Further information on the Think Tank is available online.

 

CNBP talks to the pollies at SmP

24 March 2017:

A chance to talk science with Australian politicians and policy influencers was an opportunity seized by CNBP with Centre Investigator Prof Heike Ebendorff-Heidepriem and Centre Research Fellow Dr Andrew Care both in attendance at the annual ‘Science meets Parliament’ (SmP) event, Canberra, 21-22 March, 2017.

Established by Science and Technology Australia, SmP provides 200 scientists with a unique professional development opportunity to get a clear sense of the competing rationalities of science, politics and public policy. The two-day gathering also includes a day at Parliament House, where delegates get the chance to meet privately with parliamentarians.

As part of this activity, Prof Ebendorff-Heidepriem met with Senator Chris Back and Senator Chris Ketter, and also spoke with Shadow Minister of Defence, Richard Marles. In addition, she spoke with many researchers and entrepreneurs from both the University and industry sectors.

“Improving collaboration between the research community and industry was a hot topic in many of the discussions that I had”, said Heike. “Particularly in my meeting with Senator Chris Back. People were also extremely excited about our approach, in using fibres and light to create exciting new windows into the body.”

CNBP’s Dr Andrew Care met with Opposition Leader Bill Shorten’s advisor, discussing gender equality and early education for STEM and also touching on ECR opportunities and improving research and industry ties. He also met MP Adam Bandt, the Greens spokesperson for science.

“Overall it was an extremely rewarding experience,” says Andrew. “Attending SmP gave me the opportunity to explore the political process and to network with many other researchers from academia, industry, and governance. It was fantastic to see science and innovation so high on the government’s agenda.”

A full round up from both days of SmP can be found on the STA web site – Day 1 and Day 2.

Below – MP Adam Bandt and CNBP’s Dr Andrew Care.

 

Director attends ANS 2016 in Hobart

Mark Hutchinson_1_low_sq7 December 2016:

Professor Mark Hutchinson (Director, CNBP) attended the Australasian Neuroscience Society (ANS 2016) Conference in Hobart on 6 and 7 December 2016 where he presented a talk entitled “The ‘Toll’ of Knowing You are Sick: Microglial Innate Immune Signalling as a Key Contributor to Sex Differences in Pain and Analgesia”.

The Director also chaired a session entitled “Integrated Approaches to Treating Pain and Other Diseases of the Central Nervous System: From Targets to Circuits and Beyond”.

Director speaks at scientific meeting

Mark Hutchinson_1_low_sq29 November 2016:

Professor Mark Hutchinson (Director, CNBP) participated as a symposium presenter at the ASCEPT-MPGPCR Joint Scientific Meeting held at the Melbourne Convention and Exhibition Centre on 29 November 2016.

The symposium title was: Pharmacology of brain neurotransmission.

Professor Hutchinson’s presentation title was: Addiction and the brain: the role of the immune system.

CNBP on Scope TV!

Malcolm Purdey Low Res Edit 007524 September 2016:

Scope TV  takes a look at the latest and greatest in scientific advancements and explores what’s up and coming in the wonderful world of science.

CNBP researcher Dr Malcolm Purdey features in the latest episode of Scope, discussing light based sensing and explaining how innovative optical technologies are opening up exciting new windows into the body.

Click to the 5.20 minute mark to see Malcolm and his science communication in action!