Tag Archives: media

Outreach at Fresh Science

8 November 2017:

The world’s smallest fibre-optic probe that can simultaneously see and sense deeply inside the body (Dr Jiawen Li) and an anti-cancer drug that can be switched ‘on’ and ‘off’ inside the body to help reduce chemotherapy side effects (PhD student Kathryn Palasis). These were the research narratives developed by the two CNBP scientists who attended the ‘Fresh Science’ outreach training program on the 7th-8th November in Adelaide, South Australia.

“I had a great time participating in Fresh Science,” said Kathryn Palasis.

“We had a full day of media training which included practise interviews with journalists from TV, radio and print, who taught us how to best explain our science to the general public. We then had the opportunity to present our work to some very eager and inquisitive school students, and later had to summarise our research to a crowd at the pub in the time it took for a sparkler to burn out! It was a great learning experience and a lot of fun – plus I got to meet some really cool local researchers who are all doing exciting work.”

Dr Jiawen Li also enjoyed the experience. “What I got from the program was the ability to promote my science to the media, knowledge on how to be noticed by journalists and the experience of being interviewed, as well as broader presentation skills aimed at communicating complicated science concepts to a general audience. The two days were extremely rewarding!”

Fresh Science (run by Science in Public) is a national competition helping early-career researchers find, and then share, their stories of discovery. The program takes up-and-coming researchers with no media experience and turns them into spokespeople for science, with a day of media training and a public outreach event in their home state.

Below – Fresh Science participants. Kathryn Palasis fourth from left. Dr Jiawen Li fourth from right. Photo credit: Fresh Science/Science in Public.

 

Coverage: New sensor to aid IVF

Malcolm Purdey Low Res Edit 00756 January, 2016:

The tricky process of monitoring early-stage embryos during the IVF process could become much easier with the development of a new fibre-optic sensor that can measure concurrently, hydrogen peroxide and pH (acidity-alkalinity concentrations) in solution.

The sensor, the first of its kind, was reported in the research journal ‘Sensors’ and consists of a single optical fibre, the tip of which has been functionalised with a reactive fluorescent coating.

Lead author on the paper, CNBP researcher Malcolm Purdey was interviewed by ABC News Radio and featured in other media including the Daily Examiner and BioOptics World.

Coverage: Barbara Kidman Fellowships

Barbara-Kidman10 December 2015:

University of Adelaide and CNBP researchers Dr Sabrina Heng and Dr Melanie McDowall are recipients of the Barbara Kidman Women’s Fellowship for 2016.

The Fellowship supports  female academics in enhancing and promoting their career, following time out of the workplace due to carer’s or family leave. The Fellowship is for 12 months and can be used for research support, overseas travel or professional development.

Both Sabrina and Mel were interviewed about the award, their science and their experiences in academia more generally on Radio Adelaide’s ‘Sound of Sciene’ program.

The full interview can be heard online here.

Coverage: MQ and Regeneus agreement

Ewa Goldys Low Res Edit 015924 November 2015:

Professor Ewa Goldys, Deputy Director from the Centre for Nanoscale BioPhotonics was interviewed by The Australian and CH 10 News regarding a new collaboration agreement
between Macquarie University and regenerative medicine company Regeneus. The agreement is based on further developing and commercialising CNBP cell selection technology.
http://tenplay.com.au/news/national/2015/11/24/new-futuristic-treatment

Coverage: Phone apps take health aids beyond fitness

Ewa Goldys Low Res Edit 01591 July 2015:

CNBP Deputy Director Ewa Goldys is quoted extensively in a Fairfax article (The SMH and The Age) on the use of mobile technology to diagnose illness and disease.

Detailed, is Ewa’s view on the increasing use of smart phone technology in this space, as well as a summary of recent CNBP research, describing use of a phone to conduct a common medical diagnostic test called a fluorescence assay.

See http://www.smh.com.au/digital-life/digital-life-news/phone-apps-take-health-aids-beyond-fitness-20150701-ghjjtd.html for more information.

Mark Hutchinson talks about Drug Addiction on Radio Adelaide

Hi-Res Adelaidean Mark Hutchinson-crop1 March 2015

Interview with Professor Mark Hutchinson, Professor of Nanoscale BioPhotonics; Radio Adelaide, Adelaide, Orbit, Ewart Shaw; 01 Mar 2015 09:13AM

Hutchinson says a drug addiction has to be maladaptive or bad for the organism to meet the criteria of an addiction. He says the evidence suggests there is the potential to form an addiction to cocaine. He says nicotine, alcohol, and drugs were identified as having different mechanisms of action in the brain, but they all converged onto one key rewards system in the brain. He says they believe they have identified the mechanism by which lots of different drugs of abuse are able to activate a specific pathway, and they all activate it in a similar way. He says they are now working with the US Department of Defence, who are really interested in developing compounds to see if they work in humans. He discusses the social consequences of drug crime. He discusses his work with the Tas alkaloids company [Tasmanian Alkaloids.]

Fertility Friday podcast: beyond the birds and the bees

Mel McDowall High Res Edit 004023 January 2015: Podcast about fertility

Dr Mel McDowall was interviewed by Lisa Hendrickson-Jack from “www.fertilityfriday.com” for an up and coming podcast and blog about the basic biology of fertility. Topics covered include ovulation, egg and sperm production and the influence of health and age on female and male fertility.

The podcast and blog will be published on February 27th.