Tag Archives: media

Shedding light on golden staph

3 July 2019:

A groundbreaking new technique will slash the time it takes to detect potentially lethal golden staph infection from two days to just two hours.

Researchers from the ARC Centre of Excellence for Nanoscale BioPhotonics (CNBP) targeted the bacterium with a luminescent DNA probe.

“This allows us to find the “needle in the haystack” because only the “needle” lights up,” says Dr Nima Sayyadi, Research Fellow at the Macquarie University node of the CNBP and lead author on the paper.

Golden staph, or Staphylococcus aureus, lives on the skin or in the nose. It is usually harmless, but if it enters the skin through a cut it can cause a range of infections, which in some cases are fatal.

Dr Nima Sayyadi in the lab

In the most at-risk patients, such as the elderly, it is vital to identify the infection and begin treatment with appropriate antibiotics as soon as possible. However, current identification techniques require culturing cells for up to two days to provide a positive infection result.

The new approach, known as Time-Gated Luminescent in Situ Hybridization (LISH), takes just two hours and could have a range of other applications. While it cannot yet separately identify drug resistance strains of golden staph, researchers are working on it.

CNBP scientists are also working on a range of transformational research projects based on the luminescence based detection of single cells in human body fluid samples, which will help them label antibodies and molecules as well as DNA.

“We’ve also done work in prostate cancer and bladder cancer where the target cell can be quickly and easily identified in urine samples,” says Project Lead and CNBP node leader at Macquarie University, Professor James Piper AM.

The research was reported in the journal Molecules, which you can read here.

Luminescent In Situ Hybridization (LISH)

Coverage: New sensor to aid IVF

Malcolm Purdey Low Res Edit 00756 January, 2016:

The tricky process of monitoring early-stage embryos during the IVF process could become much easier with the development of a new fibre-optic sensor that can measure concurrently, hydrogen peroxide and pH (acidity-alkalinity concentrations) in solution.

The sensor, the first of its kind, was reported in the research journal ‘Sensors’ and consists of a single optical fibre, the tip of which has been functionalised with a reactive fluorescent coating.

Lead author on the paper, CNBP researcher Malcolm Purdey was interviewed by ABC News Radio and featured in other media including the Daily Examiner and BioOptics World.

Coverage: Barbara Kidman Fellowships

Barbara-Kidman10 December 2015:

University of Adelaide and CNBP researchers Dr Sabrina Heng and Dr Melanie McDowall are recipients of the Barbara Kidman Women’s Fellowship for 2016.

The Fellowship supports  female academics in enhancing and promoting their career, following time out of the workplace due to carer’s or family leave. The Fellowship is for 12 months and can be used for research support, overseas travel or professional development.

Both Sabrina and Mel were interviewed about the award, their science and their experiences in academia more generally on Radio Adelaide’s ‘Sound of Sciene’ program.

The full interview can be heard online here.

Coverage: MQ and Regeneus agreement

Ewa Goldys Low Res Edit 015924 November 2015:

Professor Ewa Goldys, Deputy Director from the Centre for Nanoscale BioPhotonics was interviewed by The Australian and CH 10 News regarding a new collaboration agreement
between Macquarie University and regenerative medicine company Regeneus. The agreement is based on further developing and commercialising CNBP cell selection technology.
http://tenplay.com.au/news/national/2015/11/24/new-futuristic-treatment

Coverage: Phone apps take health aids beyond fitness

Ewa Goldys Low Res Edit 01591 July 2015:

CNBP Deputy Director Ewa Goldys is quoted extensively in a Fairfax article (The SMH and The Age) on the use of mobile technology to diagnose illness and disease.

Detailed, is Ewa’s view on the increasing use of smart phone technology in this space, as well as a summary of recent CNBP research, describing use of a phone to conduct a common medical diagnostic test called a fluorescence assay.

See http://www.smh.com.au/digital-life/digital-life-news/phone-apps-take-health-aids-beyond-fitness-20150701-ghjjtd.html for more information.

Mark Hutchinson talks about Drug Addiction on Radio Adelaide

Hi-Res Adelaidean Mark Hutchinson-crop1 March 2015

Interview with Professor Mark Hutchinson, Professor of Nanoscale BioPhotonics; Radio Adelaide, Adelaide, Orbit, Ewart Shaw; 01 Mar 2015 09:13AM

Hutchinson says a drug addiction has to be maladaptive or bad for the organism to meet the criteria of an addiction. He says the evidence suggests there is the potential to form an addiction to cocaine. He says nicotine, alcohol, and drugs were identified as having different mechanisms of action in the brain, but they all converged onto one key rewards system in the brain. He says they believe they have identified the mechanism by which lots of different drugs of abuse are able to activate a specific pathway, and they all activate it in a similar way. He says they are now working with the US Department of Defence, who are really interested in developing compounds to see if they work in humans. He discusses the social consequences of drug crime. He discusses his work with the Tas alkaloids company [Tasmanian Alkaloids.]