Tag Archives: Martin Ploschner

Physics in the pub!

cnbplogosquare120 June 2016:

Attendees at Sydney’s ‘Physics in the pub’ event were treated to a magical light-inspired show by CNBP researchers Martin Ploschner, Denitza Denkova and Varun Sreenivasan. Together they wowed the audience at the Three Wise Monkeys Hotel, using little more than UV light, fluorescent paint and other handy fluorescing materials.

Their act, one of a number on the night, aimed to take science out of the laboratory,  to take it to the public, and to make it educational, entertaining and fun in equal measure!

All three researchers enjoyed the experience of showcasing their science in a relaxed and informal environment, and quickly overcame any potential stage nerves to flaunt their fluro-physics to a full-house of engaged and interested members of the public.

Well done to all three – a short video of the fun-filled show can be viewed online!

Physicsinthepub_photo

Newest CNBP recruit publishes in Nature Photonics

Martin Ploschner web14 July 2015:

Our newest CNBP recruit, Dr Martin Ploschner, has just been published in the prestigious journal Nature Photonics.

The research, titled “Seeing through chaos in multimode fibres” is a study from his previous role at the University of Dundee and could open up a new era of superfast communications technology and lead to breakthroughs in the treatment of medical conditions.

The paper can be accessed here: http://rdcu.be/dmRm

The University of Dundee media release available here: http://www.dundee.ac.uk/news/2015/breakthrough-in-fibre-optics-opens-up-possibility-of-better-understanding-of-disease-and-communication-revolution.php

CNBP’s newest Research Fellow

Martin Ploschner web1 July 2015:

CNBP welcomes its newest Research Fellow – Dr Martin Ploschner.

Located at Sydney’s Macquarie University, Martin will be working in Prof Ewa Goldys’ team, working on the development of novel imaging tools (using computer holography) for imaging of fragile biological systems (such as early stage mouse embryos). He will also be developing new illumination methods based on compressing sensing for applications in biology.

Looking forward to his time with the CNBP, Martin’s previous role was at the University of Dundee, Scotland, working with Dr Tomas Cizmar. His work  involved the development of new techniques that pave the way for the use of multimode fibre as a miniature substitute to a standard microscope objective.

Welcome to the CNBP team Martin!