Tag Archives: Lindsay Parker

CNBP research wins Young Scientist Award

18 July 2019:

CNBP research fellow Dr Lindsay Parker, of Macquarie University, has won an award for the best research paper from an investigator under 40, at an international conference in Rome.

Lindsay’s work is aimed at better understanding molecules ex-pressed in the brain during pain, brain diseases and brain cancer. This could lead to improved precision drugs that specifically target only the unhealthy cells in the brain.

She won a “Young Scientist Award” at the 41st PIERS (Photonics & Electromagnetics Research Symposium) held at the University of Rome in June.

Her paper, “Utilising Glycobiology for Fluorescent Nanodiamond Uptake and Imaging in the Central Nervous System” was in the category “Remote Sensing, Inverse Problems, Imaging, Radar & Sensing”.

The paper, in collaboration with RMIT University and the University of Colorado Boulder, investigated the ability of lectin-coated fluorescent nanodiamonds to recognise specific central nervous system cell types.

The prize included cash, and an invitation to the Symposium Banquet held at Palazzo Brancaccio. Lindsay also received travel awards from MQ University Primary Carer Support for Conference Attendance ($2000) and MQ Research Centre for Diamond Science and Technology ($1000) which meant her partner and baby William were also able to be in Rome with her as she worked.

While she was in Europe, Lindsay took the opportunity to give invited talks at the Czech Academy of Sciences in Prague and at the University of Groningen in Netherlands while visiting two other labs working in similar research areas to her synthetic nanochemistry expert Dr Petr Cigler and nanobiotechnology expert A/Prof Romana Schirhagl.

Visualizing neuroinflammation

21 March 2019:

A new time-gated microscopy approach has been reported by CNBP researchers that will help neurobiologists better visualize neurokine signaling (and other) molecules in cells or tissue samples. Lead author of the publication is CNBP researcher Dr Lindsay Parker, Macquarie University.

Journal: Journal of Neuroinflammation.

Publication title:  Visualizing neuroinflammation with fluorescence and luminescent lanthanide-based in situ hybridization.

Authors: Lindsay M. Parker, Nima Sayyadi, Vasiliki Staikopoulos, Ashish Shrestha, Mark R. Hutchinson and Nicolle H. Packer.

Abstract: 

Background
Neurokine signaling via the release of neurally active cytokines arises from glial reactivity and is mechanistically implicated in central nervous system (CNS) pathologies such as chronic pain, trauma, neurodegenerative diseases, and complex psychiatric illnesses. Despite significant advancements in the methodologies used to conjugate, incorporate, and visualize fluorescent molecules, imaging of rare yet high potency events within the CNS is restricted by the low signal to noise ratio experienced within the CNS. The brain and spinal cord have high cellular autofluorescence, making the imaging of critical neurokine signaling and permissive transcriptional cellular events unreliable and difficult in many cases.

Methods
In this manuscript, we developed a method for background-free imaging of the transcriptional events that precede neurokine signaling using targeted mRNA transcripts labeled with luminescent lanthanide chelates and imaged via time-gated microscopy. To provide examples of the usefulness this method can offer to the field, the mRNA expression of toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) was visualized with traditional fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) or luminescent lanthanide chelate-based in situ hybridization (LISH) in mouse BV2 microglia or J774 macrophage phenotype cells following lipopolysaccharide stimulation. TLR4 mRNA staining using LISH- and FISH-based methods was also visualized in fixed spinal cord tissues from BALB/c mice with a chronic constriction model of neuropathic pain or a surgical sham model in order to demonstrate the application of this new methodology in CNS tissue samples.

Results
Significant increases in TLR4 mRNA expression and autofluorescence were visualized over time in mouse BV2 microglia or mouse J774 macrophage phenotype cells following lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stimulation. When imaged in a background-free environment with LISH-based detection and time-gated microscopy, increased TLR4 mRNA was observed in BV2 microglia cells 4 h following LPS stimulation, which returned to near baseline levels by 24 h. Background-free imaging of mouse spinal cord tissues with LISH-based detection and time-gated microscopy demonstrated a high degree of regional TLR4 mRNA expression in BALB/c mice with a chronic constriction model of neuropathic pain compared to the surgical sham model.

Conclusions
Advantages offered by adopting this novel methodology for visualizing neurokine signaling with time-gated microscopy compared to traditional fluorescent microscopy are provided.

CNBP at ‘Science meets Parliament’

15 February 2018:

Four CNBP’ers attended ‘Science meets Parliament (SmP)’, a high profile political engagement STA event held in Canberra, 13-14th February, 2018.

The event gives science, technology, engineering and mathematics professionals the chance to build a profile for their important work in the Parliamentary environment. This includes meeting privately with politicians to discuss areas of research expertise, as well as unique professional development opportunities focused on clarifying competing rationalities of science, politics and public policy.

The four attendees were CNBP Chief Operating Officer Kathy Nicholson, CNBP PhD student Emma Wilson from RMIT University, CNBP researcher Dr Lindsay Parker (representing Macquarie University) and Dr Sanam Mustafa (The University of Adelaide and a Superstar of STEM, Afternoon Chair on Day One of the event).

Feedback from all representatives was extremely positive with all gaining from their SmP experience.

Emma Wilson met with Western Australian Senator Slade Brockman for her Parliamentarian meeting.

“I told him about my work exploring fluorescent nanodiamonds so we can develop them as tiny light beacons to see what is happening inside our cells,” she said.

“I explained that the CNBP has created an environment where I can explore the fundamentals of the material with an application in mind.”

A major highlight for Emma was getting to meet some of her STEM heroes.

“I had a chat with Australian of the Year Professor Michelle Simmons,” she said.

“We discussed gender balance and equity and the importance of having quality mentorship for creating better scientists. We also discussed the inflexibility of institutes when it comes to accommodating people, both men and women, with carer roles.”

CNBP’s Dr Lindsay Parker was enthusiastic about the SmP event too.

“I met with MP Karen Andrews, who has been a member of the House of Representatives since 2010, representing the Division of McPherson in Queensland,” she said.

“Karen is the Assistant Minister for Vocational Education and Skills and also a co-chair of The Parliamentary Friends of Science. I explained to her how small the nanoscale is relative to things such as human hair and bacteria. I also mentioned some of the materials we work with in the Centre such as nanodiamonds, how they are fluorescent and why they are excellent nanoprobes for use in neuro-imaging.”

Lindsay continued, “I sat next to MP Craig Kelly at the Gala dinner – he’s in the House of Representatives for Hughes, New South Wales. I spoke to him about my neuroscience research and how hopefully one day we can better engineer anti-inflammatory drugs to target the correct cells with less side effects during chronic pain and Alzheimer’s. I mentioned how CNBP is an excellent multidisciplinary Centre linking biology, chemistry and physics. He asked questions about how the drugs work and when they would be ready for use in humans.”

Lindsay summed up, “All of the politicians, CEOs and organisation heads at SmP clearly recognised the need to continue to promote and improve opportunities for women in STEM industries. Senator Michaelia Cash gave a particularly inspirational and enthusiastic speech about this at the Gala dinner and I was impressed that both she and my matched MP Karen Andrews were genuinely interested in science research and improving STEM promotion as a great career in Australia.”

Below: CNBP’s Dr Lindsay Parker, COO Kathy Nicholson, Emma Wilson and Dr Sanam Mustafa at ‘Science meets Parliament’.

 

 

 

 

DECRA awarded to Centre Research Fellow

13 November 2017:

Congratulations to Dr Lindsay Parker, CNBP Research Fellow at Macquarie University who has just been granted a Discovery Early Career Researcher Award (DECRA) from the Australian Research Council (ARC).

The award will support the following research activity:

“Intelligently linking nanoscience to neuroscience with glycan biology. This project aims to provide a comprehensive description of the unique cell-surface glycan expression on inflamed neurons, astrocytes, microglia and oligodendrocytes. This project will use glycan profiling data to engineer luminescent nanoparticles with superior neuroimaging qualities for cell type-specific in vivo targeting and drug delivery in the central nervous system. The project outcomes are expected to improve our fundamental understanding of neurobiological cell-surfaces.”

Information on successful DECRA grants can be accessed on the ARC website here.

Grant success

30 January 2017:

CNBP researchers at Macquarie University – Research Fellow Lindsay Parker (pictured left) and A/Prof Andrei Zvyagin have been successful as Chief Investigators on a $100,000 Macquarie University Research Infrastructure Block Grant.

The grant will support a research assistant (Anna Guller, CNBP PhD candidate) to help build capacity in and use Macquarie University’s bioreactor equipment towards the production and maintenance of live bioartificial tissues for sustainable scientific use.

The CNBP researchers will be collaborating with the University’s Faculty of Medicine to use these artificial biotissues in order to assess nanoparticle detection capabilities/depths in complex tissue structures.

Lead CI on the grant is Professor Qian Yi in the Faculty of Medicine.

Centre researchers at Biosensor Symposium

guozhen_liu30 November 2016:

CNBP Research Fellows, Associate Professor Guozhen Liu (pictured), Dr Lindsay Parker and Dr Sabrina Heng have undertaken talks at the School of Biomedical Sciences at the University of Melbourne as part of a Biosensor Symposium, Wednesday 30th November, 2016.

Talks were as follows:

Guozhen Liu – Biophotonic Tools for Cytokine Sensing: From an on-cell surface ELISA to a spatial ELISA device.

Lindsay Parker – Biosensors and glycoproteins: linking nanoscience to neuroscience.

Sabrina Heng – Reversible Sensing with a Flip of the Switch.

The symposium shone a  spotlight on multidisciplinary research into developing, applying and using biosensors for biomedical sciences.

Lindsay Parker at SPIE 2016

lindsay_parker-low-rez-web115 February 2016:

Lindsay Parker, CNBP researcher, has presented her work at the SPIE Photonics West Conference, San Francisco, 2016.

The conference is one of the largest Biomedical Optics & Photonics Conferences in the world.

Lindsay’s paper was titled, “Fluorescent nanodiamond and lanthanide labelled in situ hybridization for the identification of RNA transcripts in fixed and CLARITY-cleared central nervous system tissues” and was selected by the chairs of the  “Neural Imaging and Sensing” portion of the conference.

Further information on the conference is available online.

 

CNBP visits Belmont High School

Outreach-1ab13 November 2015:

CNBP researchers Andy Greentree, Denitza Denkova and Lindsay Parker took their science to the students on Friday Nov 13th, visiting Belmont High School for a fun filled day of outreach, incorporating science demonstrations, talks, informal discussion and chat.

First up was a 75 minute stage show in front of approximately 80 students from Years 8 and Year 9. Light as a concept was first explained, its wave and particle nature providing the basis for the session. A leaf-blower, table tennis balls, lasers, strobe lights and running water were also used, demonstrating the nature of light and its reflective, refractive and diffractive properties.

Nanodiamonds, iPhones, invisibility cloaks and glow sticks also made an appearance with the challenges and opportunities of looking deeply into the body and CNBP’s research mission clearly outlined.

This was followed by morning tea with the teaching staff and then a further talk and Q&A session with the school’s Year 12 chemistry class.

Thank you to all the students and teachers involved on the day. Great fun and extremely rewarding!