Tag Archives: Kaixin Zhang

Optical fiber based immunosensor detects cytokines

13 November 2018:

An immunosensor created on an optical fiber surface has been developed by CNBP researchers that has successfully detected cytokine proteins in a rat’s spinal cord. The result indicates that such fiber sensors can be used as an effective and sensitive tool for localised detection of cytokines in vivo, in a range of research and clinical applications. Lead author on the published research paper was CNBP’s Kaixin Zhang.

Journal: Sensors and Actuators B: Chemical.

Publication title: An optical fiber based immunosensor for localized detection of IL-1 in rat spinal cord.

Authors: Kaixin Zhang, Azim Arman, Ayad G. Anwer, Mark R. Hutchinson, Ewa M. Goldys.

Abstract: Sensitive and localized measurements of cytokines is important in biomedicine as cytokines are produced locally where needed to induce an immune reaction. Here, we present a novel immunosensor deposited on the optical fiber surface. The sensor is capable of localized detection of interleukin-1beta (IL-1β) in the rat spinal cord. In this immunosensor, a stable immunocapture surface was formed via a biotin-streptavidin coupling strategy and fluorescent carboxylated supermagnetic iron oxide (SPIO)-IL-1β detection antibody conjugates were used for signal amplification. Under the optimal condition, the proposed immunosensor can be used for the estimation of IL-1β in vitro in the range from 3.13 pg.mL-1 to 400 pg.mL-1 with a detection limit of 1.12 pg.mL-1. Furthermore, the performance of the fiber sensor was firstly assessed by ex-vivo monitoring the secretions of the rat macrophages stimulated by lipopolysaccharide (LPS), and the results demonstrated significant correlations with a commercial ELISA kit. Furthermore, the fiber sensor was successfully utilized to carry out a localized measurement of IL-1β in a spinal cord of an anesthetized rat. The result indicates that such fiber sensors can be used as an effective and sensitive tool for localised detection of IL-1β in vivo, in a range of research and clinical applications.

Advanced sensor to unlock the secrets of the brain

17 April 2018:

CNBP researchers have announced the development of a state-of-the-art sensor that can for the first time detect signalling molecules, called cytokines, which operate in the living brain. Cytokines in the brain are secreted by glia cells that make up nearly 90% of all brain cells. Cytokines play a central role in controlling mood and cognition and may also contribute to a number of mental health disorders.

“What we’ve developed is the first sensor capable of monitoring the release of these cytokines in the brain,” says lead researcher Kaixin Zhang, a PhD candidate at the ARC Centre of Excellence for Nanoscale BioPhotonics (CNBP) at Macquarie University.

“Critically, there is mounting evidence that these glial-released cytokines play a central role in regulating a range of brain functions. In particular they are responsible for affecting mood, cognition and behaviour.”

“Our innovative new sensor has the potential to increase our knowledge not only of how the brain works, but may be able to shed light on conditions such as depression, stress, anxiety and even schizophrenia,” he says.

The sensor consists of a modified optical fibre which has had its surface treated with a capture protein. The protein reacts to the presence of cytokine molecules and is capable of monitoring local cytokine release in discrete and targeted parts of the brain.

Professor Ewa Goldys, CNBP Deputy Director, and a senior researcher on the project, notes that brain functionality is an extremely complex area where scientific knowledge is still limited.

“Our research in understanding cytokine secretion, neural circuits and how these two work together is essential to improving our understanding of the brain, in health and disease. Our sensor has opened a new window to the brain, but we still have far more to discover,” she says.

“The key benefit of our new sensor is that it enables the detection of cytokine release precisely as it happens, in living, naturally behaving animals, which is the key step on this discovery journey. To date, suitable tools have not been available to do this as the living brain is an incredibly difficult part of the body to access, and these cytokines are very difficult to measure.”

Published in the leading scientific journal ‘Brain, Behavior, and Immunity’, the cytokine sensor research was undertaken by an international team of scientists at the ARC Centre of Excellence for Nanoscale BioPhotonics (CNBP), Macquarie University, University of Colorado Boulder, Central China Normal University and The University of Adelaide.

“This is a really fantastic example of the work which we do at the CNBP, which is all about creating state-of-the-art sensing tools that can measure the inner workings of the living organism,” says Prof Goldys.

“It may be early days in this research but it will be fascinating to see where this cytokine detection takes us. It may prove to be a pivotal point in the understanding, and eventual diagnostic and clinical treatment, of a whole range of health conditions.”

PAPER:
A novel platform for in vivo detection of cytokine release within discrete brain regions. https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0889159118301302

AUTHORS: Kaixin Zhang, Michael V. Baratta, Guozhen Liu, Matthew G. Frank, Nathan R. Leslie, Linda R. Watkins, Steven F. Maier, Mark R. Hutchinson, Ewa M. Goldys.

Below – CNBP PhD Candidate – Kaixin Zhang.

Cytokine detection

6 November 2017:

New research from CNBP scientists reports on a cytokine sensor – fabricated on the surface of an optical fibre. Cytokines are molecules that play a critical role in cellular response to infection, inflammation, trauma and disease. Lead author on the paper, published in the journal ‘Biosensors and Bioelectronics’, is Centre PhD student Kaixin Zhang who is based at Macquarie University.

Journal: Biosensors and Bioelectronics.

Publication title: Robust immunosensing system based on biotinstreptavidin coupling for spatially localized femtogram mL−1 level detection of interleukin-6.

Authors: Kaixin Zhang, Guozhen Liu, Ewa M. Goldys.

Abstract: Detection of a very low amount of cytokines such as interleukin-6 (IL-6) in clinical fluids is important in biomedical research and clinical applications. Here, we demonstrate spatially-localised ultrasensitive (femtogram mL−1) level detection of IL-6 in serum and in cell culture media. Our approach is based on a sandwich immunosensor fabricated on the surface of an optical fibre. Firstly, the biotinylated IL-6 capture antibody was immobilized on the fibre surface by biotin-streptavidin coupling. Then the fabricated fibre was used for capturing IL-6 followed by exposure to detection antibody which was labeled with the fluorescent magnetic nanoparticles to report the signal. A linear relationship between IL-6 concentration and the fluorescence signal was obtained in the range from 0.4 pg mL−1 to 400 pg mL−1 of IL-6, with the limit of detection down to 0.1 pg mL−1. In addition, this optical fibre sensor was successfully applied for the localized detection of IL-6 with the spatial resolution of 200 µm and a sample volume of 1 μL. Finally, the performance of the fibre sensor was demonstrated by detection of IL-6 secreted by BV-2 cells with comparable performance of the conventional enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA).

New CNBP student at MQ node

Kaixin-Zhang_web2 September 2015:

CNBP’s Macquarie University node welcomes its newest PhD student, Kaixin Zhang from China.

Kaixin is supervised by Centre Deputy Director Ewa Goldys with his research program focused broadly in the area of nanosensors for biological application.

During his PhD period, he will be focused more specifically on the determination of cytokines by fabricating a series of new biosensors. The synthesis of new specialised fluorescent materials and an exploration of their application will also be involved.

Kaixin comes to Macquarie University, having graduated from the Jiangxi Science and Technology Normal University, China.