Tag Archives: Jeremy Thompson

IVF grant success

26 April 2017:

CNBP Chief Investigator, A/Prof Jeremy Thompson has received $7000 in travel support from the Global Connections Fund Priming Grants initiative.

The grant will fund travel to the USA to visit cattle IVF units with the aim of learning how they have made a successful business of in vitro produced embryos, and where it applies best in their (beef) breeding and genetic selection operations.

While there, A/Prof Thompson will be sharing knowledge and experiences and seeing if there are potential collaborative opportunities.

New sensing methods for embryos

2 April 2017:

A/Prof Jeremy Thompson, CNBP Chief Investigator, has given an invited talk at  the 7th Congress of the Asia Pacific Initiative on Reproduction (ASPIRE 2017) in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, on the 2nd April 2017.

The Congress is the largest clinical reproductive medicine meeting in the Asia-Pacific region with A/Prof Thompson’s talk titled, “New sensing methods for embryos.”

 

Automation in the IVF laboratory

23 February 2017:

CNBP Chief Investigator A/Prof Jeremy Thompson has delivered a talk to the “Best of ASRM-ESHRE” forum, in Paris, February 23, 2017.

The forum, a joint initiative of the American Society for Reproductive Medicine (ASRM) and the European Society of Human Reproduction and Embryology (ESHRE) brings together 1200 delegates focused in the science of reproductive medicine, with updates on the latest concepts and developments presented in a framework of lectures, debates and back-to-back sessions.

A/Prof Thompson’s well received talk was titled, “Automation in the IVF Laboratory – what works and what hasn’t.”

Failure to launch: aberrant cumulus gene expression during oocyte in vitro maturation

22 November 2016:

Failure to launch: aberrant cumulus gene expression during oocyte in vitro maturation

http://m.reproduction-online.org/content/153/3/R109.abstract
Hannah M Brown, Kylie R Dunning, Melanie Sutton-McDowall, Robert B Gilchrist,
Jeremy G Thompson and Darryl L Russell

Abstract
In vitro maturation (IVM) offers significant benefits for human infertility treatment and animal breeding, but this potential is yet to be
fully realised due to reduced oocyte developmental competence in comparison with in vivo matured oocytes. Cumulus cells occupy
an essential position in determining oocyte developmental competence. Here we have examined the areas of deficient gene
expression, as determined within microarrays primarily from cumulus cells of mouse COCs, but also other species, between in vivo
matured and in vitro matured oocytes. By retrospectively analysing the literature, directed by focussing on downregulated genes, we
provide an insight as to why the in vitro cumulus cells fail to support full oocyte potential and dissect molecular pathways that have
important roles in oocyte competence. We conclude that the roles of epidermal growth factor signalling, the expanded extracellular
matrix, cumulus cell metabolism and the immune system are critical deficiencies in cumulus cells of IVM COCs.

Oocyte IVM defined

Jeremy Thompson22 September 2016:

A/Prof Jeremy Thompson, CNBP CI is coauthor on the following research paper that explores definitions relating to ‘oocyte in vitro maturation (IVM)’. It follows recent attempts to clarify apparent differences among clinicians in use of the term.

Journal: Human Reproduction

Title: The Definition of IVM is Clear – Variations need Defining.

Authors: Michel De Vos, Johan Smitz, Jeremy G Thompson and Robert B Gilchrist.

Abstract: Oocyte in vitro maturation (IVM) is currently defined as the maturation in vitro of immature cumulus-oocyte complexes collected from antral follicles. This is the original definition as first described by Pincus and Enzmann and then by Edwards many decades ago, and this clear and unambiguous definition has served us well ever since. In an attempt to clarify apparent differences among clinicians, the following revised definition of IVM was recently proposed: ‘The retrieval of oocytes from small and intermediate sized follicles in an ovary before the largest follicle has surpassed 13 mm in mean diameter’. As such, this proposed definition should encompass the use of hCG triggering. To change the clear and long-serving definition of IVM to fit varying clinical practices requires a compelling justification based on solid scientific and clinical grounds. We are of the opinion that the proposed revised definition of IVM is counterintuitive as it includes protocols that are intended to mature oocytes in vivo The proposed definitions are cumbersome and indeed further complicate the situation. It is not scientifically rational to base the definition on follicular size, and the definition ignores the vast corporate knowledge acquired from the many decades and >6000 publications in animal research that universally practices IVM as per the existing definition. Furthermore, such a definition can lead to false results in interpreting the follow-up of children conceived using IVM. Hence, we see no rationale to change the existing definition of IVM. However, we agree that variations on IVM require alternative nomenclature-these definitions need to be intuitive and need to clearly distinguish themselves from the existing long-standing definition of IVM. This would help to clarify the recent confusion within the clinical ART community as to what is and what is not, IVM.

The paper is accessible online.

 

Founders Lecture awarded to Thompson

Jeremy Thompson21 August 2016:

Congratulations to A/Prof. Jeremy Thompson (CNBP Chief Investigator at the University of Adelaide) who has given the Founders Lecture at the Annual Scientific Meeting of the Endocrine Society of Australia and the Society for Reproductive Biology (SRB), at the Gold Coast Convention Centre, 21st August 2016.

The Founder’s Lecturer is the SRB’s major plenary speaker at the Annual Meeting, with those awarded the Lecture, recognised for their significant contributions to the field of reproduction in Australia.

According to an announcement from the SRB Secretariat, Thompson is a “fantastic asset to the SRB and well deserving of the  Founders lecture award,” having been a proactive member of the SRB for over two decades and a “world renowned expert in embryo development.”

Further information about the Annual Meeting is available online.

 

Jeremy Thompson gives talk at ESHRE

Jeremy Thompson3 March 2016:

CNBP Chief Investigator, Jeremy Thompson, has given an invited talk at a European Society of Human Reproduction and Embryology (ESHRE) workshop in Brussels, Belgium (March 3, 2016).

The workshop explored ‘Oocyte maturation: from basics to clinic’ and the title of Jeremy’s talk was ‘Haemoglobin in the antral follicle – an oocyte oxygenation story or not?’

Workshop information can be found online.

 

 

Extending prematuration with cAMP modulators enhances oocytes

Mel McDowall High Res Edit 004022 February 2016:

CNBP senior researcher Melanie McDowall (pictured) and CNBP Chief Investigator Jeremy Thompson are co-authors on a newly published paper in the Journal ‘Human Reproduction’.

Publication title: Extending prematuration with cAMP modulators enhances the cumulus contribution to oocyte antioxidant defence and oocyte quality via gap junctions.

Authors: H K Li, M L Sutton-McDowall, X Wag, S Sugimura, J G Thompson and R G Gilchrist.

Abstract:

STUDY QUESTION:

Can bovine oocyte antioxidant defence and oocyte quality be improved by extending the duration of pre-in vitro maturation (IVM) with cyclic adenosine mono-phosphate (cAMP) modulators?

SUMMARY ANSWER:

Lengthening the duration of cAMP-modulated pre-IVM elevates intra-oocyte reduced glutathione (GSH) content and reduces hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) via increased cumulus cell-oocyte gap-junctional communication (GJC), associated with an improvement in subsequent embryo development and quality.

The paper is available online.

 

 

 

Jeremy Thompson awarded Commercial Accelerator Grant

Jeremy Thompson27 January 2016:

Adelaide Research and Innovation has awarded A/Prof. Jeremy Thompson (CNBP Chief Investigator at the University of Adelaide) a Commercial Accelerator Grant of $38 000 for novel storage systems of cattle embryo production media.

Thompson notes that, “The cattle in vitro embryo production industry is hamstrung in having a major impact in improving the genetics of animals, by poor performance of generating good quality embryos from the valuable oocytes collected from an individual cow.”

“Amongst the many factors that are involved in making embryos, a major limitation is the performance of the embryo production solutions. These are highly specialised formulations and require sterile/clean room facilities to manufacture, an unbroken cold change for delivery to a specific site and have a short shelf-life of only 4 weeks.”

“We have been developing an alternative packaging system which will remove these barriers. This  was attractive to the CAS grant committee, who awarded $38,800 for the project to start immediately in 2016.”

Further information on successful Adelaide Research and Innovation grants is available online.