Tag Archives: Ivan Maksymov

Strong microwave photon-magnon coupling in multiresonant dielectric antennas

9 October 2018:

A new perspectives paper by CNBP researcher Dr Ivan Maksymov, RMIT University discusses dielectric resonant systems and demonstrates their ability to operate as multiresonant antennas for light, microwaves, magnons, sound, vibrations and heat.

Journal: Journal of Applied Physics.

Publication title: Perspective: Strong microwave photon-magnon coupling in multiresonant dielectric antennas.

Author: Ivan S. Maksymov.

Abstract: Achieving quantum-level control over electromagnetic waves, magnetisation dynamics, vibrations, and heat is invaluable for many practical applications and possible by exploiting the strong radiation-matter coupling. Most of the modern strong microwave photon-magnon coupling developments rely on the integration of metal-based microwave resonators with a magnetic material. However, it has recently been realised that all-dielectric resonators made of or containing magneto-insulating materials can operate as a standalone strongly coupled system characterised by low dissipation losses and strong local microwave field enhancement. Here, after a brief overview of recent developments in the field, I discuss examples of such dielectric resonant systems and demonstrate their ability to operate as multiresonant antennas for light, microwaves, magnons, sound, vibrations, and heat. This multiphysics behavior opens up novel opportunities for the realisation of multiresonant coupling such as, for example, photon-magnon-phonon coupling. I also propose several novel systems in which strong photon-magnon coupling in dielectric antennas and similar structures is expected to extend the capability of existing devices or may provide an entirely new functionality. Examples of such systems include novel magnetofluidic devices, high-power microwave power generators, and hybrid devices exploiting the unique properties of electrical solitons.

Future Fellowship success for CNBP researchers

13 August 2018:

In exciting grant funding news, ARC Future Fellowships were recently awarded to the following CNBP researchers:

Prof Mark Hutchinson (CNBP Director, pictured) – University of Adelaide. Measuring pain in livestock: mechanisms, objective biomarkers and treatments.

Dr Ivan Maksymov (CNBP Researcher Fellow) – RMIT University. Nonlinear optical effects with low-power non-laser light.

Dr Steven Wiederman (CNBP Associate Investigator) – University of Adelaide. From insects to robots: how brains make predictions and ignore distractions.

The Future Fellowships scheme supports research in areas of critical national importance by giving outstanding researchers incentives to conduct their research in Australia. Each Future Fellow recipient will receive salary and on-cost support for four years, and up to $50,000 in additional funding per year for other essential costs directly related to their project.

Congratulations to all Fellowship recipients who will now be able to further develop and advance their innovative areas of research! Further information on Fellowship projects are available from the ARC web site.

Sensing sound with light

Ivan Maksymov Low Res Edit 01479 September 2016:

New research from CNBP  researcher Ivan Maksymov and CNBP CI Andrew Greentree outlines a new way to detect ultrasound in the body.

The researchers showed that a plasmonic nanoantenna – like a television antenna, but 1000 times smaller than the width of a human hair – can be used to sense ultrasound in the body.

“The biggest problem with sensing ultrasound is the size of the receiver” explains Dr Maksymov. “By using metal nanoparticles, we have shown that we can shrink the size of the hydrophone.” Smaller detectors mean that ultrasound can be probed in smaller areas of the body. “The key is to look inside the smallest blood vessels.”

Solving the work was challenging as the device operates in the so-called deep subwavelength regime – where the size of the device is much smaller than the wavelength of both the light and the sound.

The research appeared in the journal Scientific Reports on the 9th of September, 2016.

Journal: Scientific Reports.

Publication title: Plasmonic nanoantenna hydrophones.

Authors: Ivan S. Maksymov & Andrew D. Greentree.

Abstract: Ultrasound is a valuable biomedical imaging modality and diagnostic tool. Here we theoretically demonstrate that a single dipole plasmonic nanoantenna can be used as an optical hydrophone for MHz-range ultrasound. The nanoantenna is tuned to operate on a high-order plasmon mode, which provides an increased sensitivity to ultrasound in contrast to the usual approach of using the fundamental dipolar plasmon resonance. Plasmonic nanoantenna hydrophones may be useful for ultrasonic imaging of biological cells, cancer tissues or small blood vessels, as well as for Brillouin spectroscopy at the nanoscale.

The paper is available online.