Tag Archives: Internat

SPIE Quantum Communications and Quantum Imaging XIII Conference

brantgibson9 August 2015:

A/Prof Brant Gibson, CNBP CI,  presented a paper at the SPIE Quantum Communications and Quantum Imaging XIII Conference (OP416), San Diego, California, 9-13 August 2015.

The paper presented was titled: ‘Hybrid quantum photonic applications of nanodiamond.’

Abstract:

Fluorescent nanodiamonds (NDs) have a range of unique properties which make them highly desirable for bioimaging applications. Their fluorescence is produced via optical excitation of atomic defects, such as the negatively charged nitrogen vacancy centre, within the diamond crystal lattice. Possessing long-wavelength emission, high brightness, no photobleaching, no photoblinking, single photon emission at room temperature, nanometer size, biocompatibility, and an exceptional resistance to chemical degradation make NDs almost the ideal fluorescent bioimaging nanoprobe. I will discuss these exciting properties in detail and also give some examples of their nano-manipulation and integration with photonic materials for hybrid ND-photonic quantum applications.

 

Roman Kostecki at ICMAT2015

Roman Kostecki28 June 2015:

CNBP researcher Roman Kostecki presented his latest research paper at the 8th International Conference on Materials for Advanced Technologies (ICMAT2015). The conference, twinned with the 4th Photonics Global Conference took place in Singapore 28 June – 3 July 2015.

The paper, titled “Thin-film Polymer Functionalization of Optical Fiber Enabling Multiligand Chemosensing” was published with an author list consisting of Roman KOSTECKI, Sabrina HENG, Heike EBENDORFF-HEIDEPRIEM, Andrew ABELL, and Tanya MONRO.

Abstract:

Silica exposed-core microstructured optical fibers (EC-MOFs) are a platform for distributed, in situ, and/or remote sensors based on fluorescence. The portion of light guided outside of the glass core, often described as ‘evanescent field’, is affected by the refractive index and absorption characteristics of the surrounding medium. This light-matter overlap provides opportunities for fluorometric measurements of the composition and concentration of an analyte along the fiber length. Functionalizing the core with a chemosensor removes the need for chemosensor/analyte premixing. Detection of aluminum cations (Al) is of particular interest as a means to monitor corrosion, human health and the environment.

We demonstrate the first example of a photo-switchable chemosensor for Al detection using a modified photochromic spiropyran (SP-I), which is appended to an ionophore for cation binding. Photochemical switching of the spiropyran allows ion binding to be switched on and off, creating a multiple use chemosensor. The SP-I sensor binds Al or calcium cations as multi- or single-ligand complexes respectively, and was modified for surface attachment. Silane- or polyelectrolyte-based methodology allows subsequent attachment of the SP-I to a glass surface. Studies with the dual ion binding SP-I integrated with the EC-MOF sensing platform provide evidence that covalent attachment is ineffective, where multiligand binding chemosensors are needed. Functionalizing EC-MOFs with a thin-film (50 nm) polymer doped with SP-I demonstrates capacity to use both multi- and single-ligand binding chemosensors. This demonstrates that the integration of photo-switchable chemosensor, thin-film polymer, and silica optical fiber elements creates a sensor capable of multiligand chemosensing anywhere along the fiber’s length. The work demonstrates a new pathway to next generation reusable and continuous operation ion sensing platforms, and that the local molecular environment of a chemosensor affects its function which can be used to control how metal ions interact with chemosensors.

 

5th Asia Pacific Optical Sensors Conference

20-22 May 20Alexandre Francois Low Res Edit 008315: Jeju Island; Korea

Dr Alex Francois presented an invited talk at the 5th Asia Pacific Optical Sensors Conference.

Surface plasmon scattering: an alternative approach for optical fibers biosensors:  Alexandre François, Beniamino Sciacca , Elizaveta Klantsataya, Agnieszka Zuber, Peter Hoffman, Manuela Klinger-Hoffman, Tanya M. Monro

The APOS 2015 continues a series of conferences that are intended to provide a central forum for an update and review of technical information covering wide range of optical sensing fields from fundamental researches to systems and applications. The conference is open to researchers and professionals from not only Asia-Pacific Rim region but also all of the world.

http://www.apos2015.org/index.php

SPIE West in San Francisco

7-12 February 201Alexandre Francois Low Res Edit 00835: Conference Presentations

Dr Alex Francois and PhD students Tess Reynolds and Jonathan Hall presented three papers at SPIE West

Jonathan Hall, Shahraam Afshar, Matthew Henderon, Alexandre Francois, Tess Reynolds, Nicolas Riesen and Tanya Monro, “Predicting the whispering gallery mode spectra of microresonators,” SPIE LASE, 9343-71 (2015)

Reynolds, A. Francois, M.R. Henderson, S.J. Nicholls, T.M Monro “Optimization of Whispering Gallery Mode sensor design for applications in biosensing,” SPIE BIOS, 9315-19  (2015)

Alexandre François, Nicolas Riesen, Hong Ji, Shahraam Afshar Vahid, Tanya M. Monro “Whispering-gallery mode lasers for biosensing: Reducing the lasing threshold,” SPIE LASE, 9343-66 (2015)

Dr Georgios Tsiminis visits Oxford University

georgiostsiminis28 January 2015: Department of Pharmacology, Oxford University.

“Taking a closer look at vitamin B12”, delivered by CNBP researcher Dr Georgios Tsiminis and  co-author Dr Joanna Brooks from the ARC Centre for Research on Ageing, Health and Wellbeing at the Australian National University.

The talk gave an overview on the potential for using Raman spectroscopy as a minimally invasive tool to measure and track vitamin B12 levels in humans. Vitamin B12 deficiency has been identified as a potential modifiable risk factor for dementia and Alzheimer’s disease in later life and is also the mechanism through which pernicious anaemia affects humans (vitamin B12 does not get absorbed through food due to lack of intrinsic factor). Current techniques for measuring vitamin B12 in humans, such as microbial growth and ELISAs, are both resource- and time-consuming, resulting in the general population not being regularly tested for vitamin B12 deficiency. Our aim is to produce a portable device that can measure vitamin B12 and its associated chemical compounds in a reproducible, reliable, fast and minimally-invasive manor. In this talk we explained the basic principles of Raman spectroscopy and showed some initial results that generated great interest at Oxford, who have asked us to keep them up to date with future developments on our work.

To find out a bit more about this presentation see Martyn Hooper’s Blog post “the Blog from  he chair of the Pernicious Anaemia Society.

Book Chapter: the Use of Nanotechnology in Pregnancy

25 January Achini Vidanapathirana Low Res Edit 01162015:

This book chapter by CNBP researcher Dr Achini Vidnapathirana examines  ‘the applications of nanotechnology during pregnancy (current, research, and potential applications), the unique pregnancy-related characteristics that relate in the application of nanoscale materials, and the concerns on maternal/fetal well-being.’

http://link.springer.com/referenceworkentry/10.1007/978-94-007-6178-0_100902-1/fulltext.html