Tag Archives: Georgios Tsiminis

Concordia College visits CNBP

IMG_Georgios-lab_adjustedweb21 September 2015:

Students of Concordia College were left with an improved understanding of nano biophotonics, as well as the opportunities that a science education can provide, following a visit to the CNBP at the University of Adelaide earlier today.

Impressed students were shown around CNBP laboratories by researchers Georgios Tsiminis and Yinlan Ruan, and were also given a number of  presentations, explaining in greater detail what it is that the Centre is hoping to achieve with its multi-disciplinary approach to research.

It is hoped that CNBP visits from Concordia College will be an ongoing activity, helping inspire younger students with a passion for science and technology.

 

 

 

CNBP researchers visit IPHT Jena

IPHT visit13 July 2015:

From the 28th of June to the 3rd of July, Dr Georgios Tsiminis and Dr Erik Schartner from the Adelaide node of the CNBP visited the Institute of Photonic Technology (IPHT) in Jena, Germany, as part of a longer trip that also included oral presentations at the CLEO Europe 2015 International Conference and company visits throughout Germany.

The two CNBP members gave a seminar to the Fiber Optics work on their recent work on comparing different fluorescence optical fibre sensors (Dr Tsiminis) and on optical fibre thermometry for in vivo applications (Dr Schartner), followed by a lab tour of the IPHT fibre fabrication facility and measurement laboratories. They also met up with another CNBP researcher, Dr Herbert Foo, who is on a long-term visit in Jena working on advanced glass-making.

The rest of this long-term visit was spent working at the laboratory of Prof. Dr Juergen Popp, IPHT, a world-renowned expert of Raman spectroscopy for sensing applications. Dr Tsiminis and Dr Schartner worked with with Dr Christian Matthaeus and Dr Sebastian Dochow from the Raman group. Their work involved gaining hands-on experience with some of the optical fibre Raman probes developed within the group and their deployment for in vivo and ex vivo measurements.

Initial experiments were conducted in bacon cuts, highlighting the difference between fat tissue and red meat in terms of their respective Raman spectra, with fat tissue showing the typical lipid Raman signature that was absent in the collagen-rich red meat part of the sample.

Further experiments were then performed inside a sample of rabbit aorta (preserved in formalin) that enabled the monitoring of fat concentration along the length of the aorta, allowing the pinpointing of areas were fat accumulates inside the blood vessel and therefore locations of possible blood narrowing, a big concern for heart disease.

The CNBP researchers also visited the Schott Glas Museum and got an overview of the early stages of high quality and precision glass making, as well as the Optischen Museum Jena, featuring the history of optic technologies through the ages.

Overall this was a very successful and enjoyeable visit to IPHT in Jena that produced the first parts of shared work and expertise with the CNBP collaborators led by Prof. Dr Juergen Popp. This initial work and fruitful discussions set the base for a future collaborative work project on using Raman spectroscopy to monitor cardiovascular health and we look forward to welcoming some of our IPHT colleagues at the CNBP retreat in November.

Image: Researchers in front of the IPHT building in Jena, Germany. From left to right: Dr Georgios Tsiminis (CNBP), Dr Herbert Foo (CNBP), Dr Erik Schartner (CNBP), Dr Stephen Warren-Smith (IPHT), Prof. Dr Hartmut Bartelt (IPHT) and Dr Linh Nguyen (IPAS).

Cutting Edge Speaker at Science Teachers Association Conference

georgiostsiminis13 April 2015: CNBP talks to Science Teachers:

Dr Georgios Tsiminis was invited to represent the University of Adelaide at the Science Teachers Association of South Australia Annual Conference and Expo 2015 as an invited Cutting Edge Speaker.  Hosted at Brighton Secondary School with an audience of Science teachers from around South Australia.

The talk was titled “Listening to molecules using light: optical detection of chemicals” and co-authors include Dr Joanna Brooks (ARC Centre for Research on Ageing, Health and Wellbeing at the Australian National University), Nigel Spooner (IPAS), Tanya Monro (UniSA/CNBP), Fenghong Chu (Shanghai University of Electric Power).

 The talk gave an overview of how light can be used as a tool for detecting chemicals in complex samples and focused on using optical fibres as photonic tools for chemical sensing by Raman spectroscopy. Two examples were given, measuring vitamin B12 in the scope of exploring vitamin B12 deficiency as a modifiable risk factor for dementia and Alzheimer’s; and explosives detection, where Raman spectroscopy was performed using microstructtured suspended core optical fibres to enhance the signal and enable the detection of fundamentally different explosives (TNT and hydrogen peroxide) using the same sensor at quantities of less than a microgram. Both examples highlight the great flexibility of photonic technologies for chemical sensing and establish the cross-disciplinary nature of research undertaken within the CNBP, IPAS and the University of Adelaide.

 

Dr Georgios Tsiminis visits Oxford University

georgiostsiminis28 January 2015: Department of Pharmacology, Oxford University.

“Taking a closer look at vitamin B12”, delivered by CNBP researcher Dr Georgios Tsiminis and  co-author Dr Joanna Brooks from the ARC Centre for Research on Ageing, Health and Wellbeing at the Australian National University.

The talk gave an overview on the potential for using Raman spectroscopy as a minimally invasive tool to measure and track vitamin B12 levels in humans. Vitamin B12 deficiency has been identified as a potential modifiable risk factor for dementia and Alzheimer’s disease in later life and is also the mechanism through which pernicious anaemia affects humans (vitamin B12 does not get absorbed through food due to lack of intrinsic factor). Current techniques for measuring vitamin B12 in humans, such as microbial growth and ELISAs, are both resource- and time-consuming, resulting in the general population not being regularly tested for vitamin B12 deficiency. Our aim is to produce a portable device that can measure vitamin B12 and its associated chemical compounds in a reproducible, reliable, fast and minimally-invasive manor. In this talk we explained the basic principles of Raman spectroscopy and showed some initial results that generated great interest at Oxford, who have asked us to keep them up to date with future developments on our work.

To find out a bit more about this presentation see Martyn Hooper’s Blog post “the Blog from  he chair of the Pernicious Anaemia Society.

IPAS Pilot Project Grants Awarded

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15 December 2014: Three Grants awarded to CNBP researchers

CNBP resarchers at the University of Adelaide were successful in obtaining three IPAS pilot project grants totaling $45,000

Characterisation of aquaporin-1 (AQP1) ion channel activity in migrating cancer cells using a novel photoswitchable fluorescent probe, Andrea Yool, Sabrina Heng, Jinxin (Victor) Pei, $15K

Rapid phenotyping of human stem cells sub-populations using optical spectroscopy, Georgios Tsiminis, Erik Schartner, Simon Koblar, Mark Hutchinson, $10K

UV-guiding silica hollow-core fibre for biological sensing, Philip Light, Sabrina Heng, Chris Perrella, Heike Ebendorff-Heidepriem, $15K

Fortnightly Sensing Meetings at University of Adelaide

georgios TsiminisOctober 2014: Sensing Meetings

Sensing meetings will be held at the University of Adelaide every second Thursday (10:30 -11:30) in the Braggs Building 2.14

The idea is that one or two members of the theme will be chosen to present a brief (strictly no more than 15 min) talk about either their work or on a paper in the literature that is of interest to the theme – volunteers will be appreciated and encouraged! Besides that a general overview of activities, existing problems, insights and new opportunities will be discussed too.

If you would like further information about these meetings please contact Dr Georgios Tsiminis