Tag Archives: Ewa Goldys

CNBP takes centre stage at Biofocus Conference

15 December 2016:

CNBP researchers were at the forefront of this year’s Biofocus Conference held at Macquarie University, 15 December 2016.

Early career Centre researchers Annemarie Nadort, Lindsay Parker and Nima Sayyadi sat on the conference organising committee, Centre Deputy Director Ewa Goldys (pictured) opened proceedings while CNBP Chief Investigator Prof Andrew Abell (from the University of Adelaide) delivered an extremely well received plenary talk titled, “Defining biomolecular structure and function in solution and on surfaces: new therapeutics and biological probes.”

The annual conference provides a platform for the multidisciplinary community at Macquarie University to present and communicate research, discuss research outcomes and facilitate interdisciplinary collaborations spanning the fields of of biomedical sciences, biomedical engineering, physics, chemistry and medicine.

Feedback from attendees at this year’s event was extremely positive with plenty of formal and informal scientific discussion taking place between sessions.

 

Deputy Director presents at Wagga Wagga

Ewa Goldys Low Res Edit 015929 November 2016:

CNBP Deputy Director Prof Ewa Goldys has given a talk at the School of Biomedical Sciences, Charles Sturt University, Wagga Wagga on her research success “A Eureka Moment for Cell Colour Technology.”

The talk results from Prof Goldys being awarded the recent Australian Museum Eureka Prize for ‘Innovative Use of Technology’.

Prof Goldys, together with Dr Martin Gosnell, developed a hyperspectral imaging technique that allows for the successful extraction of specific biomolecular information hidden in fluorescent colour signatures of living cells and tissues.

The talk examined the technology and the real world translational outcomes that will result from this exciting area of study that will support clinicians in making improved diagnosis and health decisions for patients.

 

NeuRA Invited Seminar Series

Ewa Goldys Low Res Edit 015925 November 2016:

Professor Ewa Goldys, Deputy Director of the CNBP, has given an invited talk at the Neuroscience Research Australia (NeuRA) Invited Lecture series, 25th November 2016, Sydney.

The talk was titled “A Eureka moment for cell colour technology” and explored the research behind Prof Goldys and her success in being awarded the 2016 Australian Museum Eureka Prize for ‘Innovative Use of Technology’.

Professor Goldys and her team were recognised for their innovative colour-focused research (and pioneering hyperspectral imaging technique), able to distinguish between healthy and diseased cells, in areas as diverse as embryology, neurodegeneration, cancer and diabetes.

Real-world translational outcomes that will result from this exciting area of study, that will support clinicians in making improved diagnosis and health decisions for patients, was also discussed.

The NeuRA lecture series attracts leading national and international researchers from all fields of neuroscience.

 

Goldys gives public talk on cell colour

Ewa Goldys Low Res Edit 01594 October 2016:

CNBP Deputy Director Prof Ewa Goldys gave a colourful and illuminating public talk at Macquarie University today, discussing a pioneering hyperspectral imaging technique that is helping researchers better understand the composition of cells, right down at a molecular level.

The talk, entitled, ‘A Eureka Moment for Cell Colour Technology’, explored the use of colour information to differentiate between cells – applying photonics to biology.

Goldys believes that this next-generation methodology offers a new window to non-invasively and rapidly detect major health conditions including neurodegeneration, cancer and diabetes.

The research won Goldys and her colleague Martin Gosnell, the 2016 ANSTO Eureka Prize for Innovative Use of Technology.

Below: Ewa Goldys presenting her work on the fluorescent colour signatures of living cells and tissues, using big data techniques and innovative computing technology .

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Cell colour technology wins Eureka prize

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Ewa Goldys, Deputy Director of the ARC Centre of Excellence for Nanoscale BioPhotonics (CNBP) and Professor at Macquarie University, together with Dr Martin Gosnell, CNBP research affiliate and Managing Director at Quantitative Pty Ltd have won the ANSTO ‘Innovative Use of Technology’ award at the 2016 Australian Museum Eureka Prizes.

They were recognised for their innovative colour focused research, able to distinguish between healthy and diseased cells, in areas as diverse as embryology, neurodegeneration, cancer and diabetes.

“We are absolutely thrilled to be awarded this prize out of such a high-quality field of researchers and scientists,” said Prof Goldys following the Eureka announcement.

“The hyperspectral imaging technique pioneered by our team lets us successfully extract specific biomolecular information hidden in fluorescent colour signatures of living cells and tissues.”

Goldys explained, that with this research, a new window into the body had been opened.

“Through the approach we are taking, incorporating leading-edge microscopes, ‘big data’ and the high processing speeds of modern computers, we are able to noninvasively and rapidly detect major health conditions, across a wide variety of areas.”

The future of the research, Goldys believes is one of high-impact and significant possibility.

“These colour-based cellular and molecular measurements have the potential to be done in-vivo (in the body), expediting the potential for healthcare decisions based on the health needs of the individual and their unique biological characteristics.”

Concluded Goldys, “The really exciting thing is that while we are probing the very limits of our understanding of life at the molecular level, this technology also yields real world translational outcomes – outcomes that will support clinicians in making improved diagnosis and health decisions for patients.”

The Eureka Prizes are presented by the Australian Museum and reward excellence in research and innovation, science communication and journalism, leadership and school science. Prize winners were announced at an Awards Dinner at Sydney Town Hall.

 

Australian Museum Eureka Prizes 2016

Cell colour technology shortlisted for Eureka honours

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Professor Ewa Goldys, CNBP Deputy Director and Dr Martin Gosnell, Quantitative Pty Ltd, have been selected as finalists in the prestigious Australian Museum Eureka Prizes, for their work in developing technology that enables colour to be used as a uniquely powerful diagnostic tool in medicine.

Selected in the award category ‘2016 ANSTO Eureka Prize for Innovative Use of Technology’, Goldys and Gosnell use modern day microscopes and powerful computer analysis to explore the subtle colour differentiations of cells and tissue, down to a molecular level.

“With our pioneering hyperspectral imaging technique we are able to unveil the biomolecular composition of cells and their nanoscale contents,” said Ewa Goldys, Deputy Director of the ARC Centre of Excellence for Nanoscale BioPhotonics (CNBP) and a Professor at Macquarie University.

“This lets us distinguish between healthy and diseased cells in areas as diverse as embryology, neurodegeneration, cancer and diabetes. Key is the great potential of this technology to impact positively on lives – supporting clinicians in making improved diagnosis and health decisions for patients.”

Noting that it was a pleasure and a privilege to be nominated as a Eureka finalist, Goldys concluded, “Our innovative methodology is letting us probe the very limits of our understanding of life at the molecular level. It’s important that we share these amazing discoveries with the public and the community at large – the Eureka Prizes are the perfect platform to help support us in these efforts.”

Dr Martin Gosnell, CNBP research affiliate and Managing Director at Quantitative Pty Ltd was equally pleased by the Eureka nomination.

“I’m absolutely delighted that our research has been recognised at this level. By using the colour of light from cells and tissues, we are pushing the very frontiers of molecular exploration and measurement.”

“Our high-powered data analysis and imaging expertise is truly opening up new windows into the body.”

The Eureka Prizes are presented by the Australian Museum and reward excellence in research and innovation, science communication and journalism, leadership and school science.

Prize winners will be announced at an Awards Dinner at Sydney Town Hall on Wednesday 31 August 2016.

Site-Dependent Luminescence and Thermal Stability of Eu2+ Doped Fluorophosphate toward White LEDs for Plant Growth

2016/07/21 : : Bronwyn Gibson : Publication : RedXcross16x9 Title – Site-Dependent Luminescence and Thermal Stability of Eu2+ Doped Fluorophosphate toward White LEDs for Plant Growth.

Authors – Jiayu Chen, Niumiao Zhang, Chongfeng Guo, Fengjuan Pan, Xianju Zhou, Hao Suo, Xiaoqi Zhao and Ewa M Goldys.

Abstract – Eu2+ activated fluorophosphate Ba3GdNa(PO4)3F (BGNPF) with blue and red double-color emitting samples were
prepared via a solid-state method in a reductive atmosphere. Their crystal structure and cationic sites were identified in light of X-ray diffraction pattern Rietveld refinement. Three different Ba2+ sites, coordinated by six O atoms referred to as Ba1, two F and five O atoms as Ba2, and two F and six O atoms as Ba3, were partially substituted by Eu2+. Photoluminescence emission (PL) and excitation (PLE) spectra of phosphor BGNPF:Eu2+ along with the lifetimes were characterized at the liquid helium temperature (LHT), which further confirm the existence of three Eu2+ emitting centers resulting in 436, 480, and 640
nm emission from the 5d→4f transitions of Eu2+ in three different Ba2+ crystallographic sites. These emissions overlap with the absorption spectra of carotenoids and chlorophylls from plants, which could directly promote the photosynthesis. Temperature-dependent PL spectra were used to investigate the thermal stability of phosphor, which indicates that the PL intensity of BGNPF:0.9% Eu2+ with optimal composition at 150°C still keeps 60% of its PL intensity at room temperature, in which blue emission has higher thermal-stability than the red emission. Furthermore, the approaching white LED devices have also been manufactured with a 365 nm n-UV LED chip and present phosphor, which make operators more comfortable than that of the plant growth purple emitting LEDs system composed of blue and red light. Results indicate that this phosphor is an attractive dual-responsive candidate phosphor in the application n-UV light-excited white LEDs for plant growth.

Link – http://pubs.acs.org/doi/pdfplus/10.1021/acsami.6b06102.

CNBP contributes to OSA white paper

Ewa Goldys Low Res Edit 015920 June 2016:

CNBP Deputy Director Prof Ewa Goldys, has taken part in the development of an OSA white paper on the subject of label-free techniques for biomedical diagnostics and imaging.

The white paper, just released, was based on the many contributions to an OSA Incubator event held on 16-18 September 2015 at OSA Headquarters, Washington, DC, USA.

The goal of this event was to evaluate the main bottlenecks for clinical translation of label-free optical techniques including technological and regulatory challenges, to identify potential solutions and to develop a prioritized list of recommendations.

Titled, “Label-free Optical Techniques for Biomedical Diagnostics & Imaging: Challenges and Opportunities for Clinical Translation”, the white paper is accessible online.

Ultrasensitive imaging of unique nanoruby probes

Wan Razali6 June 2016:

Our CNBP researchers describe a wide-field time-gated photoluminescence microscopy system, customised for ultrasensitive imaging of unique nanoruby probes in this latest paper published in the Journal of Biophotonics.

Publication Title: Wide-Field Time-Gated Photoluminescence Microscopy for Fast Ultrahigh-Sensitivity Imaging of Photoluminescent Probes.

Authors: Wan A W Razali (pictured top left), Varun K A Sreenivasan, Carlo Bradac, Mark Connor, Ewa M Goldys and Andrei V Zvyagin.

Abstract: Fluorescence microscopy is a fundamental technique for the life sciences, where biocompatible and photostable photoluminescence probes in combination with fast and sensitive imaging systems are continually transforming this field. A wide-field time-gated photoluminescence microscopy system customised for ultrasensitive imaging of unique nanoruby probes with long photoluminescence lifetime is described. The detection sensitivity derived from the long photoluminescence lifetime of the nanoruby makes it possible to discriminate signals from un-wanted autofluorescence background and laser backscatter by employing a time-gated image acquisition mode. This mode enabled several-fold improvement of the photoluminescence imaging contrast of discrete nanoru-
bies dispersed on a coverslip. It enabled recovery of the photoluminescence signal emanating from discrete na-norubies when covered by a layer of an organic fluorescent dye, which were otherwise invisible without the use of spectral filtering approaches. Time-gated imaging also facilitated high sensitivity detection of nanorubies in a biological environment of cultured cells. Finally, we monitor the binding kinetics of nanorubies to a functionalised substrate, which exemplified a real-time assay in biological fluids. 3D-pseudo colour images of nanorubies immersed in a highly fluorescent dye solution. Nanoruby photolumines-cence is subdued by that of the dye in continuous  excitation/imaging (left), however it can be recovered by time-gated imaging (right). At the bottom is schematic diagram of nanoruby assay in a biological fluid.

The paper is available online.

 

Minnesota students visit MQ node

Ewa Goldys Low Res Edit 015920 May 2016:

On Friday May 20th 2016, a group of 25 engineering and physics students from the University of Minnesota visited Macquarie University for a very full day of talks, seminars and laboratory tours.

As a part of this visit, CNBP Deputy Director Prof Ewa Goldys provided a 45 minute talk to the students, providing an overview of the Centre and its key research activities.

The future use of nanoparticles, to aid in healthcare and diagnostic capability provoked widespread interest and discussion in the group as they saw the potential benefits of the still evolving technology.

Below: Ewa Goldys explaining the use of nano-rubies and nano-crystals in CNBP related research.

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