Tag Archives: Ewa Goldys

Gold nanoparticles for bioimaging

22 March 2017:

A new publication from CNBP researchers (lead author Sandhya Clement pictured) reports on a more effective and less harmful gold-based nano-agent for bioimaging and photodynamic therapy treatment for deep tissue tumors.

The work has just been reported in the journal ‘Microchimica Acta ’ and is accessible online.

Journal: Microchimica Acta.

Title: Verteprofin conjugated to gold nanoparticles for fluorescent cellular bioimaging and X-ray mediated photodynamic therapy.

Authors: Sandhya Clement, Wenjie Chen, Ayad G. Anwer & Ewa M. Goldys.

Abstract: Photodynamic therapy (PDT) uses photosensitizers, light and molecular oxygen to generate cytotoxic reactive oxygen species. Its effectiveness is limited to <1 cm due to the limited penetration depth of light. The present study compares the PDT effectivity of the photosensitizer verteporfin (VP) conjugated to gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) (a) by using deeply penetrating X-rays administered in standard radiotherapy doses, and (b) by using red light (690 nm). VP was conjugated to AuNPs of around 12 nm size to enhance the interaction of ionizing radiation with PS. For comparison, VP also was directly exposed to X-rays. It is found that VP alone is stimulated by X-rays to generate singlet oxygen. The conjugate to AuNPs also generated a significant amount of singlet oxygen on irradiation with X-rays in comparison to illumination with 690-nm light. It is also found that the rate of singlet oxygen generation is amplified in case of AuNP-conjugated VP compared to VP alone. The performance of the AuNP-VP conjugate and of the VP alone was tested in Panc 1 cells. Their viability was impaired much more in these two scenarios than with the X-ray radiation only. This suggests excellent perspectives for PDT based on VP and with X-ray stimulation, both as a stand-alone photosensitizer and in Au-NP conjugates. Moreover, both VP and AuNP-VP conjugates show bright fluorescence in physiological media for excitation/emission wavelengths in the range of 405/690 nm; hence they can also be used for simultaneous bioimaging.

Investigating cell metabolism

Aziz Rehman1 March 2017:

A new publication from CNBP researchers (lead author Aziz Ul Rehman pictured) reports on the application of hyperspectral imaging in combination with fluorescence spectroscopy and chemical quenching to provide a new methodology to investigate cell metabolism.

The work has just been reported in the journal ‘Biomedical Optics Express’ and is accessible online.

Journal: Biomedical Optics Express.

Title: Fluorescence quenching of free and bound NADH in HeLa cells determined by hyperspectral imaging and unmixing of cell autofluorescence.

Authors: Aziz Ul Rehman, Ayad G. Anwer, Martin E. Gosnell, Saabah B. Mahbub, Guozhen Liu, and Ewa M. Goldys.

Abstract: Carbonyl cyanide-p-trifluoro methoxyphenylhydrazone (FCCP) is a well-known mitochondrial uncoupling agent. We examined FCCP-induced fluorescence quenching of reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide / nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NAD(P)H) in solution and in cultured HeLa cells in a wide range of FCCP concentrations from 50 to 1000µM. A non-invasive label-free method of hyperspectral imaging of cell autofluorescence combined with unsupervised unmixing was used to separately isolate the emissions of free and bound NAD(P)H from cell autofluorescence. Hyperspectral image analysis of FCCP-treated HeLa cells confirms that this agent selectively quenches fluorescence of free and bound NAD(P)H in a broad range of concentrations. This is confirmed by the measurements of average NAD/NADH and NADP/NADPH content in cells. FCCP quenching of free NAD(P)H in cells and in solution is found to be similar, but quenching of bound NAD(P)H in cells is attenuated compared to solution quenching possibly due to a contribution from the metabolic and/or antioxidant response in cells. Chemical quenching of NAD(P)H fluorescence by FCCP validates the results of unsupervised unmixing of cell autofluorescence.

Hyperspectral unmixing methodology validated

Aziz Rehman10 February 2017:

A new publication from CNBP researchers Aziz Ul Rehman (pictured), Ayad Anwer, Martin Gosnell, Saabah Mahbub, Guozhen Liu and Ewa Goldys demonstrates the validation of an innovative hyperspectral unmixing methodology, that can derive chemical information from cell colour.

The work has just been reported in the journal ‘Biomedical Optics Express’ and is accessible online.

Journal: Biomedical Optics Express.

Title: Fluorescence quenching of free and bound NADH in HeLa cells determined by hyperspectral imaging and unmixing of cell autofluorescence.

Authors: Aziz Ul Rehman, Ayad G. Anwer, Martin E. Gosnell, Saabah B. Mahbub, Guozhen Liu, and Ewa M. Goldys.

Abstract: Carbonyl cyanide-p-trifluoro methoxyphenylhydrazone (FCCP) is a well-known mitochondrial uncoupling agent. We examined FCCP-induced fluorescence quenching of reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide / nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NAD(P)H) in solution and in cultured HeLa cells in a wide range of FCCP concentrations from 50 to 1000µM. A non-invasive label-free method of hyperspectral imaging of cell autofluorescence combined with unsupervised unmixing was used to separately isolate the emissions of free and bound NAD(P)H from cell autofluorescence. Hyperspectral image analysis of FCCP-treated HeLa cells confirms that this agent selectively quenches fluorescence of free and bound NAD(P)H in a broad range of concentrations. This is confirmed by the measurements of average NAD/NADH and NADP/NADPH content in cells. FCCP quenching of free NAD(P)H in cells and in solution is found to be similar, but quenching of bound NAD(P)H in cells is attenuated compared to solution quenching possibly due to a contribution from the metabolic and/or antioxidant response in cells. Chemical quenching of NAD(P)H fluorescence by FCCP validates the results of unsupervised unmixing of cell autofluorescence.

Gold-loaded liposomes with photosensitizers for PDT

2 February 2017:

A new publication from CNBP researchers Wei Deng (pictured), Sandhya Clement and Ewa Goldys indicates that gold-loaded liposomes incorporating photosensitizers may serve as improved agents in photodynamic therapy and chemotherapy. The work has just been reported in the International Journal of Nanomedicine and is accessible online.

Journal: International Journal of Nanomedicine.

Title: Light-triggered liposomal cargo delivery platform incorporating photosensitizers and gold nanoparticles for enhanced singlet oxygen generation and increased cytotoxicity

Authors: Zofia Kautzka, Sandhya Clement, Ewa M Goldys and Wei Deng.

Abstract: We developed light-triggered liposomes incorporating 3–5 nm hydrophobic gold
nanoparticles and Rose Bengal (RB), a well-known photosensitizer used for photodynamic
therapy. Singlet oxygen generated by these liposomes with 532 nm light illumination was
characterized for varying the molar ratio of lipids and gold nanoparticles while keeping
the amount of RB constant. Gold nanoparticles were found to enhance the singlet oxygen
generation rate, with a maximum enhancement factor of 1.75 obtained for the molar ratio of hydrogenated soy l-α-phosphatidylcholine:1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-hosphoethanolamineN-(hexanoylamine): gold of 57:5:17 compared with liposomes loaded with RB alone. The experimental results could be explained by the local electric field enhancement caused by gold nanoparticles. We further assessed cellular cytotoxicity of gold-loaded liposomes by encapsulating an antitumor drug, doxorubicin (Dox); such Dox-loaded liposomes were applied to human colorectal cancer cells (HCT116) and exposed to light. Gold-loaded liposomes containing RB and Dox where Dox release was triggered by light were found to exhibit higher cytotoxicity compared with the liposomes loaded with RB and Dox alone. Our results indicate that goldloaded liposomes incorporating photosensitizers may serve as improved agents in photodynamic therapy and chemotherapy.

CNBP takes centre stage at Biofocus Conference

15 December 2016:

CNBP researchers were at the forefront of this year’s Biofocus Conference held at Macquarie University, 15 December 2016.

Early career Centre researchers Annemarie Nadort, Lindsay Parker and Nima Sayyadi sat on the conference organising committee, Centre Deputy Director Ewa Goldys (pictured) opened proceedings while CNBP Chief Investigator Prof Andrew Abell (from the University of Adelaide) delivered an extremely well received plenary talk titled, “Defining biomolecular structure and function in solution and on surfaces: new therapeutics and biological probes.”

The annual conference provides a platform for the multidisciplinary community at Macquarie University to present and communicate research, discuss research outcomes and facilitate interdisciplinary collaborations spanning the fields of of biomedical sciences, biomedical engineering, physics, chemistry and medicine.

Feedback from attendees at this year’s event was extremely positive with plenty of formal and informal scientific discussion taking place between sessions.

 

Deputy Director presents at Wagga Wagga

Ewa Goldys Low Res Edit 015929 November 2016:

CNBP Deputy Director Prof Ewa Goldys has given a talk at the School of Biomedical Sciences, Charles Sturt University, Wagga Wagga on her research success “A Eureka Moment for Cell Colour Technology.”

The talk results from Prof Goldys being awarded the recent Australian Museum Eureka Prize for ‘Innovative Use of Technology’.

Prof Goldys, together with Dr Martin Gosnell, developed a hyperspectral imaging technique that allows for the successful extraction of specific biomolecular information hidden in fluorescent colour signatures of living cells and tissues.

The talk examined the technology and the real world translational outcomes that will result from this exciting area of study that will support clinicians in making improved diagnosis and health decisions for patients.

 

NeuRA Invited Seminar Series

Ewa Goldys Low Res Edit 015925 November 2016:

Professor Ewa Goldys, Deputy Director of the CNBP, has given an invited talk at the Neuroscience Research Australia (NeuRA) Invited Lecture series, 25th November 2016, Sydney.

The talk was titled “A Eureka moment for cell colour technology” and explored the research behind Prof Goldys and her success in being awarded the 2016 Australian Museum Eureka Prize for ‘Innovative Use of Technology’.

Professor Goldys and her team were recognised for their innovative colour-focused research (and pioneering hyperspectral imaging technique), able to distinguish between healthy and diseased cells, in areas as diverse as embryology, neurodegeneration, cancer and diabetes.

Real-world translational outcomes that will result from this exciting area of study, that will support clinicians in making improved diagnosis and health decisions for patients, was also discussed.

The NeuRA lecture series attracts leading national and international researchers from all fields of neuroscience.

 

Goldys gives public talk on cell colour

Ewa Goldys Low Res Edit 01594 October 2016:

CNBP Deputy Director Prof Ewa Goldys gave a colourful and illuminating public talk at Macquarie University today, discussing a pioneering hyperspectral imaging technique that is helping researchers better understand the composition of cells, right down at a molecular level.

The talk, entitled, ‘A Eureka Moment for Cell Colour Technology’, explored the use of colour information to differentiate between cells – applying photonics to biology.

Goldys believes that this next-generation methodology offers a new window to non-invasively and rapidly detect major health conditions including neurodegeneration, cancer and diabetes.

The research won Goldys and her colleague Martin Gosnell, the 2016 ANSTO Eureka Prize for Innovative Use of Technology.

Below: Ewa Goldys presenting her work on the fluorescent colour signatures of living cells and tissues, using big data techniques and innovative computing technology .

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Cell colour technology wins Eureka prize

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA31 August 2016:

Ewa Goldys, Deputy Director of the ARC Centre of Excellence for Nanoscale BioPhotonics (CNBP) and Professor at Macquarie University, together with Dr Martin Gosnell, CNBP research affiliate and Managing Director at Quantitative Pty Ltd have won the ANSTO ‘Innovative Use of Technology’ award at the 2016 Australian Museum Eureka Prizes.

They were recognised for their innovative colour focused research, able to distinguish between healthy and diseased cells, in areas as diverse as embryology, neurodegeneration, cancer and diabetes.

“We are absolutely thrilled to be awarded this prize out of such a high-quality field of researchers and scientists,” said Prof Goldys following the Eureka announcement.

“The hyperspectral imaging technique pioneered by our team lets us successfully extract specific biomolecular information hidden in fluorescent colour signatures of living cells and tissues.”

Goldys explained, that with this research, a new window into the body had been opened.

“Through the approach we are taking, incorporating leading-edge microscopes, ‘big data’ and the high processing speeds of modern computers, we are able to noninvasively and rapidly detect major health conditions, across a wide variety of areas.”

The future of the research, Goldys believes is one of high-impact and significant possibility.

“These colour-based cellular and molecular measurements have the potential to be done in-vivo (in the body), expediting the potential for healthcare decisions based on the health needs of the individual and their unique biological characteristics.”

Concluded Goldys, “The really exciting thing is that while we are probing the very limits of our understanding of life at the molecular level, this technology also yields real world translational outcomes – outcomes that will support clinicians in making improved diagnosis and health decisions for patients.”

The Eureka Prizes are presented by the Australian Museum and reward excellence in research and innovation, science communication and journalism, leadership and school science. Prize winners were announced at an Awards Dinner at Sydney Town Hall.

 

Australian Museum Eureka Prizes 2016

Cell colour technology shortlisted for Eureka honours

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA29 July 2016:

Professor Ewa Goldys, CNBP Deputy Director and Dr Martin Gosnell, Quantitative Pty Ltd, have been selected as finalists in the prestigious Australian Museum Eureka Prizes, for their work in developing technology that enables colour to be used as a uniquely powerful diagnostic tool in medicine.

Selected in the award category ‘2016 ANSTO Eureka Prize for Innovative Use of Technology’, Goldys and Gosnell use modern day microscopes and powerful computer analysis to explore the subtle colour differentiations of cells and tissue, down to a molecular level.

“With our pioneering hyperspectral imaging technique we are able to unveil the biomolecular composition of cells and their nanoscale contents,” said Ewa Goldys, Deputy Director of the ARC Centre of Excellence for Nanoscale BioPhotonics (CNBP) and a Professor at Macquarie University.

“This lets us distinguish between healthy and diseased cells in areas as diverse as embryology, neurodegeneration, cancer and diabetes. Key is the great potential of this technology to impact positively on lives – supporting clinicians in making improved diagnosis and health decisions for patients.”

Noting that it was a pleasure and a privilege to be nominated as a Eureka finalist, Goldys concluded, “Our innovative methodology is letting us probe the very limits of our understanding of life at the molecular level. It’s important that we share these amazing discoveries with the public and the community at large – the Eureka Prizes are the perfect platform to help support us in these efforts.”

Dr Martin Gosnell, CNBP research affiliate and Managing Director at Quantitative Pty Ltd was equally pleased by the Eureka nomination.

“I’m absolutely delighted that our research has been recognised at this level. By using the colour of light from cells and tissues, we are pushing the very frontiers of molecular exploration and measurement.”

“Our high-powered data analysis and imaging expertise is truly opening up new windows into the body.”

The Eureka Prizes are presented by the Australian Museum and reward excellence in research and innovation, science communication and journalism, leadership and school science.

Prize winners will be announced at an Awards Dinner at Sydney Town Hall on Wednesday 31 August 2016.