Tag Archives: Erik Schartner

CNBP researchers get commercialisation grants

19 December 2016:

CNBP researchers Prof Rob McLaughlin (pictured) and Dr Erik Schartner, have received funding for their research activity through the University of Adelaide’s Commercial Accelerator Scheme.

Through CAS, the University contributes up to $400,000 each year in cash to research projects with a commercial application. The funding is provided for proof of concept and early commercialisation activities, to promote translational research for impact, and greater industry engagement.

Funding details follow below, with additional information available online.

Smart needles for safer and more effective brain surgery
$80,000 awarded to Professor Rob McLaughlin (Adelaide School of Medicine and ARC Centre of Excellence for Nanoscale BioPhotonics )
A novel miniaturised imaging probe, so small that it can be encased within a hypodermic needle for use in neurosurgery, enables safer and more effective brain biopsies. Having already progressed this product to initial human in vivo studies, this high-tech medical device is ready to go through the regulatory pathways. If commercialised, it could service an estimated $200m market, creating new employment opportunities in South Australia, and better neurosurgery outcomes globally.

Cancer cell detector
$80,000 awarded to Dr Erik Schartner (School of Physical Sciences and ARC Centre of Excellence for Nanoscale BioPhotonics)
With 15-20% of breast cancer surgery patients requiring additional surgery to further remove tumorous tissue, there is a need for improved surgical practices that can also provide enhanced cosmetic outcomes. This technology offers a novel detection tool using optical fibre sensors that will differentiate between cancerous and normal tissues based on pH levels, to provide specific, real-time information to surgeons.

 

Optical fibre probe aims to aid breast cancer surgery

Erik Shartner Low Res Edit 007930 November 2016:

Exciting translational work by CNBP researchers (project leader Dr Erik Schartner pictured left) has resulted in the development of an optical fibre probe that distinguishes breast cancer tissue from normal tissue – potentially allowing surgeons to be much more precise when removing breast cancer. The work has just been reported in the journal ‘Cancer Research’ and is accessible online.

Journal: Cancer Research.

Title: Cancer Detection in Human Tissue Samples Using a Fiber-Tip pH Probe.

Authors: Erik P. Schartner, Matthew R. Henderson, Malcolm Purdey, Deepak Dhatrak, Tanya M. Monro, P. Grantley Gill and David F. Callen.

Abstract:
Intraoperative detection of tumorous tissue is an important unresolved issue for cancer surgery. Difficulty in differentiating between tissue types commonly results in the requirement for additional surgeries to excise unremoved cancer tissue or alternatively in the removal of excess amounts of healthy tissue. Although pathologic methods exist to determine tissue type during surgery, these methods can compromise postoperative pathology, have a lag of minutes to hours before the surgeon receives the results of the tissue analysis, and are restricted to excised tissue. In this work, we report the development of an optical fiber probe that could potentially find use as an aid for margin detection during surgery. A fluorophore-doped polymer coating is deposited on the tip of an optical fiber, which can then be used to record the pH by monitoring the emission spectra from this dye. By measuring the tissue pH and comparing with the values from regular tissue, the tissue type can be determined quickly and accurately. The use of a novel lift-and-measure technique allows for these measurements to be performed without influence from the inherent autofluorescence that commonly affects fluorescence-based measurements on biological samples. The probe developed here shows strong potential for use during surgery, as the probe design can be readily adapted to a low-cost portable configuration, which could find use in the operating theater. Use of this probe in surgery either on excised or in vivo tissue has the potential to improve success rates for complete removal of cancers.

 

CNBP at SIRT 2016

Erik Shartner Low Res Edit 00791 May 2016:

CNBP researchers Dr Hannah Brown, Dr Sabrina Heng and Dr Erik Schartner (pictured) presented invited talks to a range of researchers and clinicians at the ‘Scientists in Reproductive Technology (SIRT)’ conference in Adelaide on the 1st of May, 2016.

Explored in their talks were differing ways in which upcoming Centre research might find use within the embryology labs of the future – this tying into the meeting theme “From basic research to clinical practice: How to revolutionise IVF practice.”

Talk titles from the CNBP researchers were as follows:

  • Hannah: Haemoglobin: Exciting and unexpected roles in fertility.
  • Sabrina: Developing light-driven regenerable chemical tools for biological applications.
  • Erik: Developing optical fibre probes for biosensing.

Further information on Scientists in Reproductive Technology (SIRT), a sub-group representing the scientific membership of The Fertility Society of Australia, can be found online.

Single-ring hollow core optical fibers produced

Georgios Tsminis_web9 March 2016:

CNBP researchers have published a paper in Optics Express, reporting on the fabrication of the first extruded hollow core optical fiber with a single ring of cladding holes. The fibers were used to perform Raman sensing of methanol, demonstrating their potential for future fiber sensing applications.

Title:  Single-ring hollow core optical fibers made by glass billet extrusion for Raman sensing.

Authors: G. Tsiminis, K. J. Rowland, E. P. Schartner, N. A. Spooner, T. M. Monro and H. Ebendorff-Heidepriem.

Abstract: We report the fabrication of the first extruded hollow core optical fiber with a single ring of cladding holes, and its use in a chemical sensing application. These single suspended ring structures show antiresonance reflection optical waveguiding (ARROW) features in the visible part of the spectrum. The impact of preform pressurization on the geometry of these fibers is determined by the size of the different hole types in the preform. The fibers are used to perform Raman sensing of methanol, demonstrating their potential for future fiber sensing applications.

The paper is available online.

 

CNBP session at ESA-SRB meeting

ESA meeting24 August 2015:

Nanoscale biosensing in reproductive medicine was the theme of a CNBP symposium at the Annual Scientific Meeting of the Endocrine Society of Australia and the Society for Reproductive Biology for 2015.

CNBP speakers included Prof. Mark Hutchinson, Prof. Ewa Goldys and A/Prof Brant Gibson who presented the concepts/applications of their CNBP work, followed by presentations specifically related to reproduction by Dr Erik Schartner, Mr Malcolm Purdy and Dr Sabrina Heng.

Title talks were as follows:

Mark Hutchinson: New windows into the body.

Ewa Goldys: Through the looking glass: what can we see in the early embryo when we look carefully enough.

Brant Gibson: Nanodiamond for BioPhotonic and Hybrid-Photonic applications.

Sabrina Heng: Microstructured Optical Fibers and Photoswitches: Light-Driven Sensors for
Metal Ions in Biology.

Erik Schartner: Development of optical fibre probes for biosensing applications.

Malcolm S Purdey: A Non-invasive Sensor for Hydrogen Peroxide and pH.

Further information on the meeting is available online.

CNBP researchers visit IPHT Jena

IPHT visit13 July 2015:

From the 28th of June to the 3rd of July, Dr Georgios Tsiminis and Dr Erik Schartner from the Adelaide node of the CNBP visited the Institute of Photonic Technology (IPHT) in Jena, Germany, as part of a longer trip that also included oral presentations at the CLEO Europe 2015 International Conference and company visits throughout Germany.

The two CNBP members gave a seminar to the Fiber Optics work on their recent work on comparing different fluorescence optical fibre sensors (Dr Tsiminis) and on optical fibre thermometry for in vivo applications (Dr Schartner), followed by a lab tour of the IPHT fibre fabrication facility and measurement laboratories. They also met up with another CNBP researcher, Dr Herbert Foo, who is on a long-term visit in Jena working on advanced glass-making.

The rest of this long-term visit was spent working at the laboratory of Prof. Dr Juergen Popp, IPHT, a world-renowned expert of Raman spectroscopy for sensing applications. Dr Tsiminis and Dr Schartner worked with with Dr Christian Matthaeus and Dr Sebastian Dochow from the Raman group. Their work involved gaining hands-on experience with some of the optical fibre Raman probes developed within the group and their deployment for in vivo and ex vivo measurements.

Initial experiments were conducted in bacon cuts, highlighting the difference between fat tissue and red meat in terms of their respective Raman spectra, with fat tissue showing the typical lipid Raman signature that was absent in the collagen-rich red meat part of the sample.

Further experiments were then performed inside a sample of rabbit aorta (preserved in formalin) that enabled the monitoring of fat concentration along the length of the aorta, allowing the pinpointing of areas were fat accumulates inside the blood vessel and therefore locations of possible blood narrowing, a big concern for heart disease.

The CNBP researchers also visited the Schott Glas Museum and got an overview of the early stages of high quality and precision glass making, as well as the Optischen Museum Jena, featuring the history of optic technologies through the ages.

Overall this was a very successful and enjoyeable visit to IPHT in Jena that produced the first parts of shared work and expertise with the CNBP collaborators led by Prof. Dr Juergen Popp. This initial work and fruitful discussions set the base for a future collaborative work project on using Raman spectroscopy to monitor cardiovascular health and we look forward to welcoming some of our IPHT colleagues at the CNBP retreat in November.

Image: Researchers in front of the IPHT building in Jena, Germany. From left to right: Dr Georgios Tsiminis (CNBP), Dr Herbert Foo (CNBP), Dr Erik Schartner (CNBP), Dr Stephen Warren-Smith (IPHT), Prof. Dr Hartmut Bartelt (IPHT) and Dr Linh Nguyen (IPAS).

Youth ANZAAS visits CNBP in Adelaide

cnbplogosquare19 July 2015:

CNBP researchers Roman Kostecki, Georgios Tsiminis , Mel McDowall, Peipei Jia, Erik Schartner and Tess Reynolds were happy to host a visiting Youth ANZAAS tour at their laboratories at the University of Adelaide on July 9th, 2015.

Youth ANZAAS  (organised by the Australian and New Zealand Association for the Advancement of Science)  is an annual residential international forum for science students in Years 10 to 12. Every year, students from each State and Territory are selected to participate in science activities and experiences over a period of a week.

These high achieving students with eager minds were excited to be shown around the working CNBP laboratories, and learnt more about the research that is being undertaken by the Centre, from the lectures  that each researcher provided.

Publication: New probes for detection of defects in human sperm.

Malcolm Purdey Low Res Edit 007530 January 2015: Free Radical Biology Medicine

New fluorescent molecules for detecting oxidative stress in sperm has just been published by researchers in the Recognise theme at the University of Adelaide. The article in Free Radical Biology and Medicine outlines the use of the compounds in human sperm, and their ability to differentiate between poor and good sperm. It is hoped that these fluorescent probes will aid in the diagnosis of male infertility.

Purdey, Malcolm; Schartner, Erik; Monro, Tanya; Thompson, Jeremy; Abell, Andrew: New molecules for detecting oxidative stress in sperm; Free Radical Biology and Medicine.

Dowload the full article:  http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0891584915000222#