Tag Archives: Dayong Jin

Centre AI awarded prestigious Malcolm McIntosh Prize

18 October 2017:

CNBP Associate Investigator Professor Dayong Jin, at the University of Technology Sydney, has been awarded the Malcolm McIntosh Prize for Physical Scientist of the Year.

The award recognises Professor Jin’s innovative work with nanocrystals which allow for enhanced molecular imaging deep within the cellular environment, aiding early stage detection of cancer and disease.

The Prize, part of the ‘Prime Minister’s Prizes for Science’ series, are awarded annually and are a public recognition and tribute to the contributions that scientists, innovators and science teachers are making to Australia’s current and future scientific and commercialisation capabilities.

Full award details as well as a video and summary of Professor Jin’s work is available from the Australian Government web site.

John Booker Medal goes to Dayong Jin

Dayong Jin  Low Res Edit 009617 November 2016:

Congratulations to CNBP Investigator Professor Dayong Jin who has been awarded the 2017 John Booker Medal by the Australian Academy of Science.

Professor Jin was described by the Academy as a world leader in his field, with his research opening up many opportunities in biomedical devices, early diagnosis and light-triggered nanomedicine.

You can read the full story of Professor Jin’s success in an article on the UTS news site.

Ground breaking hybrid nanocrystal work

Dayong Jin  Low Res Edit 00968 January 2016:

The top ranking journal ‘Nature Communications’ has published the latest ground breaking research from CNBP scientists with a paper titled, ‘Three-dimensional controlled growth of monodisperse sub-50 nm heterogeneous nanocrystals’.

The paper details the creation of  a library of over 800 newly shaped nanocrystals formed from ordered atom clusters over a period of three years. The different shaped or ‘hybrid’ nanocrystals will act as new tools impacting the areas of bio-imaging, diagnostics and nano-medicine.

According to CNBP Chief Investigator, Prof Dayong Jin, the work could form new solutions to getting around the body’s immune system response in the targeted treatment of cancerous cells, which causes both the healthy and diseased cells to die.

The full text of the paper is available online from the Nature Communicatons web site.

 

Controlling upconversion nanocrystals for emerging applications

Dayong Jin  Low Res Edit 00966 November 2015:

The latest review paper from CNBP researchers Dayong Jin and Bingyang Shi, bench-mark their world-leading roles in upconversion nanotechnoloy.

The paper is titled, “Controlling upconversion nanocrystals for emerging applications.”

Authors: Bo Zhou, Bingyang Shi, Dayong Jin & Xiaogang Liu.

The full paper is available online with the abstract included below.

Abstract: Lanthanide-doped upconversion nanocrystals enable anti-Stokes emission with pump intensities several orders of magnitude lower than required by conventional nonlinear optical techniques. Their exceptional properties, namely large anti-Stokes shifts, sharp emission spectra and long excited-state lifetimes, have led to a diversity of applications. Here, we review upconversion nanocrystals from the perspective of fundamental concepts and examine the technical challenges in relation to emission colour tuning and luminescence enhancement. In particular, we highlight the advances in functionalization strategies that enable the broad utility of upconversion nanocrystals for multimodal imaging, cancer therapy, volumetric displays and photonics.

Bio-conjugation of protein molecules to upconversion nanoparticles

Dayong Jin  Low Res Edit 00962 October 2015:

A novel, simple, and stable method for one-step bio-conjugation of protein molecules to upconversion nanoparticles is demonstrated in the latest paper released by CNBP researchers in the journal ‘Analytical Chemistry’.

The paper is titled “One-step Protein Conjugation to Upconversion Nanoparticles.”

Authors: Jie Lu, Yinghui Chen, Deming Liu, Wei Ren, Yiqing Lu, Yu Shi, James A. Piper, Ian T. Paulsen, and Dayong Jin.

The full paper is available online with the abstract included below.

Abstract: The emerging upconversion nanoparticles offer a fascinating library of ultrasensitive luminescent probes for a range of biotechnology applications from biomarker discovery, single molecule tracking, early disease diagnosis, deep tissue imaging, to drug delivery and therapies.

The effective bio-conjugation of inorganic nanoparticles to the molecule-specific proteins, free of agglomeration, non-specific binding or biomolecule de-activation, is crucial for molecular recognition of target molecules or cells.

The current available protocols require multiple steps which can lead to low probe stability, specificity and reproducibility. Here we report a simple and rapid protein bio-conjugation method based on a one-step ligand exchange using the DNAs as the linker. Our method benefits from the robust DNA-Protein conjugates as well as from multiple ions binding capability.

Protein can be pre-conjugated via an amino group at the 3’ end of a synthetic DNA molecule to the protein, so that the 5′ end phosphoric acid group and multiple phosphate oxygen atoms in the phosphodiester bonds are exposed to replace the oleic acid ligands on the surface of upconversion nanoparticles due to their stronger ions-chelating capability to lanthanides.

We demonstrated our method can efficiently pull out the upconversion nanoparticles from organic solvent into an aqueous phase. The upconversion nanoparticles then become hydrophilic, stable and specific biomolecules recognition. This allows us to successfully functionalize the upconversion nanoparticles with horseradish peroxidise (HRP) for catalytic colorimetric assay and for streptavidin (SA) biotin affinity assays.

 

In-vivo imaging of Vitamin C

Dayong Jin  Low Res Edit 009618 September 2015:

A new paper has been released in Scientific Reports with two CNBP researchers as contributing authors –  Dayong Jin and Xianlin Zheng. The paper detailed the successfull development of a responsive luminescence probe, TOB-Eu3+, for specific recognition and background-free quantification of vitamin C in living cells and lab animals.

Authors: Bo Song, Zhiqing Ye, Yajie Yang, Hua Ma, Xianlin Zheng, Dayong Jin & Jingli Yuan

Abstract: Sensitive optical imaging of active biomolecules in the living organism requires both a molecular probe specifically responsive to the target and a high-contrast approach to remove the background interference from autofluorescence and light scatterings. Here, a responsive probe for ascorbic acid (vitamin C) has been developed by conjugating two nitroxide radicals with a long-lived luminescent europium complex. The nitroxide radical withholds the probe on its “off” state (barely luminescent), until the presence of vitamin C will switch on the probe by forming its hydroxylamine derivative. The probe showed a linear response to vitamin C concentration with a detection limit of 9.1 nM, two orders of magnitude lower than that achieved using electrochemical methods. Time-gated luminescence microscopy (TGLM) method has further enabled real-time, specific and background-free monitoring of cellular uptake or endogenous production of vitamin C, and mapping of vitamin C in living Daphnia magna. This work suggests a rational design of lanthanide complexes for background-free small animal imaging of biologically functional molecules.

The full paper is accessible online.

Centre CIs win Eureka prize

Eureka27 August 2015:

A team headed up by CNBP Chief Investigators Prof. Dayong Jin and Prof. Tanya Monro has been recognised for its innovative research in developing super-bright nanocrystals (termed Super Dots), winning ‎the Eureka‬ 2015 Prize for Excellence in Interdisciplinary Scientific Research.

The Super Dots team, consisting of Dayong Jin, CNBP, University of Technology Sydney and Macquarie University; Tanya Monro, CNBP, University of South Australia and University of Adelaide; and Bradley Walsh, Minomic International and Macquarie University, was awarded the prize for its work in the creation and use of nanocrystals that can illuminate hidden diseased cells in a living body and which also has application in the labeling, coding and authentication space.

Based on advances in diverse fields including material chemistry, optical physics, nanotechnology, biotechnology, computational modelling and instrumentation engineering, Super Dot technology is truly interdisciplinary in nature explained Prof. Jin.

“Our invention is a typical example of an interdisciplinary approach.  By sourcing advances in physics, chemistry and biology, we have been able to breakthrough bottleneck issues in material sciences and optical physics, allowing us to develop a new transformational technology.”

He added, “Research within a single discipline is interesting, but interdisciplinary research, working with collaborators with a shared focus as a team, is far more exciting and rewarding.”

Additional information on this winning team is available online from the Australian Museum – Eureka web site.

 

 

 

CNBP makes mark at APNFO10

Wan Razali16 July 2015:

The 10th Asia-Pacific Conference on Near-field Optics (APNFO10), held July 7-10 2015 in Japan, saw significant CNBP representation and visibility.

Two Centre Chief Investigators gave invited talks:

Dayong Jin (University of Technology, Sydney) – Upconversion SuperDots for Nanoscale Biophotonics. 

Brant Gibson (RMIT University) – Nanodiamonds: Hybrid-Photonic and BioPhotonic applications.

CNBP PhD student Wan Aizuddin Wan Razali (pictured) also won the IAC Award at  APNFO10 for top Student Oral with Poster presentation. His topic – “Ultrasensitive Nanoruby Imaging using Time gated Luminescence Microscopy.”

Full conference details can be found here.

Professor Dayong Jin joins UTS

Dayong Jin  Low Res Edit 009625 May 2015:

Professor Dayong Jin, an ARC Future Fellow and Chief Investigator with the CNBP, has joined the University of Technology, Sydney (UTS) science faculty to grow the ‘Initiative for Biomedical Materials & Devices (IBMD)’, into an international collaborative network.

An interview with Dayong Jin on his new position and future goals can be found on the UTS web site – http://www.uts.edu.au/about/faculty-science/news/new-collaborative-science-expert-put-ibmd-world-stage

 

Dr Yong Liu joins team

yong liu29 April 2015:

Dr Yong Liu has recently joined the CNBP team, as the ‘Qianjiang Scholar and Distinguished Professor of Zhejiang Province’,  a joint appointment with the Wenzhou Medical University in China. He received his PhD from the ARC Centre of Excellence for Electromaterials Science (ACES) from the University of Wollongong. Thereafter, he continued his research at the University of Dayton and Case Western Reserve University before moving back to China. He has won the ‘2011 Scopus Young Research Award in Life Sciences of China’ and will be working with Prof. Dayong Jin at the CNBP Macquarie Node in the area of hybrid nanomaterials for multimodal bioimaging and biosensing.