Tag Archives: commercialisation

Commercialisation workshop outlines opportunities

17 May 2018:

Thursday 17th May saw CNBP, The Institute for Photonics and Advanced Sensing (IPAS) and Adelaide Enterprise come together at the University of Adelaide to jointly host a well-attended Commercialisation Workshop.

The event, with 45 participants comprising CNBP/IPAS researchers, students, Centre Associate Investigators and Chief Investigators looked to provide information, advice and discussion on commercialising technologies successfully, best-practice in starting and exiting start-ups, as well as tips for successful working relationships between academics and industry.

CNBP’s Business Development Manager Mel Trebilcock who helped coordinate the workshop saw the day as a great success.

“Firstly, Adelaide Enterprise provided an overview of a tech transfer office, templates relating to Invention Disclosures, Patents and the step by step process for a researcher ready to start the commercialisation process.”

“Then we had guest speakers – Melissa McBurnie (Brandon Capital) and Stewart Bartlett (from spinout company Ferronova), discuss their history of success and failure along the technology-translation journey, as well as talk about alternate  career pathways for researchers. They both provided some fantastic insights, including the adage that it’s okay to fail but that there is the need to stay positive and focused on your desired research outcomes.”

The afternoon session of the workshop saw attendees break-up into smaller groups and undertake a practical hands-on exercise whereby they had to work-up an invention based on household waste, to fill-out an invention disclosure, and to then provide a pitch to the whole room.

“This allowed for great involvement and interaction with an amazing amount of commercialisation experience being shared by attendees and guests,” says Mel Trebilcock.

New commercialisation workshops are also being planned by the CNBP for August.

“These will help prepare colleagues and collaborators to refine and learn the art of pitches with industry. It will also help them to lead ‘pitch teams’ presenting at a ‘Shark Tank’ style event to be held at this year’s CNBP Conference at Lorne,” she says.

A successful CNBP/IPAS commercialisation workshop at the University of Adelaide.

CNBP researchers get commercialisation grants

19 December 2016:

CNBP researchers Prof Rob McLaughlin (pictured) and Dr Erik Schartner, have received funding for their research activity through the University of Adelaide’s Commercial Accelerator Scheme.

Through CAS, the University contributes up to $400,000 each year in cash to research projects with a commercial application. The funding is provided for proof of concept and early commercialisation activities, to promote translational research for impact, and greater industry engagement.

Funding details follow below, with additional information available online.

Smart needles for safer and more effective brain surgery
$80,000 awarded to Professor Rob McLaughlin (Adelaide School of Medicine and ARC Centre of Excellence for Nanoscale BioPhotonics )
A novel miniaturised imaging probe, so small that it can be encased within a hypodermic needle for use in neurosurgery, enables safer and more effective brain biopsies. Having already progressed this product to initial human in vivo studies, this high-tech medical device is ready to go through the regulatory pathways. If commercialised, it could service an estimated $200m market, creating new employment opportunities in South Australia, and better neurosurgery outcomes globally.

Cancer cell detector
$80,000 awarded to Dr Erik Schartner (School of Physical Sciences and ARC Centre of Excellence for Nanoscale BioPhotonics)
With 15-20% of breast cancer surgery patients requiring additional surgery to further remove tumorous tissue, there is a need for improved surgical practices that can also provide enhanced cosmetic outcomes. This technology offers a novel detection tool using optical fibre sensors that will differentiate between cancerous and normal tissues based on pH levels, to provide specific, real-time information to surgeons.