Tag Archives: Brant Gibson

New paper in ‘Nanoscale’

Low Res Edit 01065 December 2016:

A new publication from CNBP researchers (lead author Philipp Reineck pictured) demonstrates bright and photostable fluorescence from nitrogen-vacancy centers in unprocessed nanodiamond particle aggregates. The work has just been reported in the journal ‘Nanoscale’ and is accessible online.

Journal: Nanoscale.

Title: Bright and photostable nitrogen-vacancy fluorescence from unprocessed detonation nanodiamond.

Authors: P. Reineck, M. Capelli, D. W. M. Lau, J. Jeske, M. R. Field, T. Ohshim, A. D. Greentree and B. C. Gibson.

Abstract: Bright and photostable fluorescence from nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centers is demonstrated in unprocessed detonation nanodiamond particle aggregates. The optical properties of these particles is analyzed using confocal fluorescence microscopy and spectroscopy, time resolved fluorescence decay measurements, and optically detected magnetic resonance experiments. Two particle populations with distinct optical properties are identified and compared to high-pressure high-temperature (HPHT) fluorescent
nanodiamonds. We find that the brightness of one detonation nanodiamond particle population is on the same order as that of highly processed fluorescent 100 nm HPHT nanodiamonds. Our results may open the path to a simple and up-scalable route for
the production of fluorescent NV nanodiamonds for use in bioimaging applications.

Near-infrared fluorescent nanomaterials

Low Res Edit 010628 October 2016:

CNBP researchers Philipp Reineck (pictured left) and A/Prof Brant Gibson explore recent advances in the development and use of near-infrared fluorescent nanomaterials for biomedical imaging and sensing applications in this just released review paper.

Journal: Advanced Optical Materials

Title: Near-Infrared Fluorescent Nanomaterials for Bioimaging and Sensing

Authors: Philipp Reineck and Brant Cameron Gibson

Abstract: A great challenge in noninvasive biomedical imaging is the acquisition of
images inside a biological system at the cellular level. Common modalities used today
such as magnetic resonance or computed tomography imaging have the advantage that
any part of a living organism can be imaged at any depth, but are limited to millimeter
resolution and can usually not be employed e.g., for surgical guidance. Optical imaging
techniques offer resolution on the 100 nanometer scale, but are limited by the strong
attenuation of visible light by biological matter and are traditionally used to image on the
surface. Near-infrared light in the “biological windows” can penetrate much deeper into
biological samples, rendering fluorescence-based imaging a viable alternative. In the past
two decades, many fluorescent nanomaterials have been developed to operate in the near
infrared, yet only few materials emitting above 1000 nm exist and none are approved for
clinical use. This review describes recent advances in the development and use of nearinfrared fluorescent nanomaterials for biomedical imaging and sensing applications. The physical and chemical properties as well as the bioconjugation and application of materials such as organic fluorophores, semiconductor quantum dots, carbon-based materials, rare earth materials, and polymer particles are discussed.

The paper is accessible online.

 

 

Acoustically-Driven Trion & Exciton Modulation in Piezoelectric 2D MoS2

Brant Gibson Low Res4 January 2016:

CNBP’s A/Prof. Brant Gibson (CNBP CI) and Dr. Desmond Lau (CNBP Technical Officer) featured as co-authors in a recently published paper in the journal ‘Nano Letters’.

The paper exploited the recent discovery of the piezoelectricity in odd-numbered layers of two-dimensional molybdenum disulfide (MoS2), to show the possibility of reversibly tuning the photoluminescence of single and odd-numbered multilayered MoS2 using high frequency sound wave coupling.

As such, the work reveals several key fundamentals governing acousto-optic properties of odd-layered MoS2 that can be implemented in future optical and electronic systems.

Additional information can be found in the Journal ‘Nano Letters’ online.

CNBP does Melbourne Knowledge Week

cnbplogosquare120 October 2015:

CNBP’s RMIT node reached out to the public today, hosting a panel discussion on nanoscale technology as a part of  Melbourne Knowledge Week.

‘Up Close and Revealed: Life at the Nanoscale’ was the theme of the event with a focus on nanoscale optical sensors, quantum technology and next generation computational devices.

Panel speakers consisted of CNBP’s RMIT node leader A/Prof Brant Gibson, CNBP Advisory Board member Prof Goran Roos, Prof Calum Drummond from RMIT and CNBP industry partner Mr Jian Shen from Olympus Australia.

Following the entertaining and informative panel dialogue, members of the public were provided with tours of CNBP’s new research laboratories, and provided with further information on CNBP’s current research activities.

Melbourne Knowledge Week showcases the city’s broad range of innovative projects, institutions and ideas with over 50 separate events taking place from the 19th to 25th October 2015.

Knowledge-Week-RMITab

RMIT node leader visits Macquarie Uni

brantgibson6 October 2015:

Brant Gibson, CNBP node leader at RMIT, visited Macquarie University for two days on October 6/7 and gave an invited colloquium in the Physics department and also had a number of meetings with CNBP personnel.

The well attended colloquium was titled, “Nanodiamond: BioPhotonic and Hybrid-Photonic Applications,” and examined ways in which nano-diamonds are ideal  for developing fluorescent bioimaging nanoprobes. Details of the research activities at the RMIT node of the ARC Centre of Excellence for Nanoscale BioPhotonics were also discussed.

Brant-at-MQ-web

 

CNBP session at ESA-SRB meeting

ESA meeting24 August 2015:

Nanoscale biosensing in reproductive medicine was the theme of a CNBP symposium at the Annual Scientific Meeting of the Endocrine Society of Australia and the Society for Reproductive Biology for 2015.

CNBP speakers included Prof. Mark Hutchinson, Prof. Ewa Goldys and A/Prof Brant Gibson who presented the concepts/applications of their CNBP work, followed by presentations specifically related to reproduction by Dr Erik Schartner, Mr Malcolm Purdy and Dr Sabrina Heng.

Title talks were as follows:

Mark Hutchinson: New windows into the body.

Ewa Goldys: Through the looking glass: what can we see in the early embryo when we look carefully enough.

Brant Gibson: Nanodiamond for BioPhotonic and Hybrid-Photonic applications.

Sabrina Heng: Microstructured Optical Fibers and Photoswitches: Light-Driven Sensors for
Metal Ions in Biology.

Erik Schartner: Development of optical fibre probes for biosensing applications.

Malcolm S Purdey: A Non-invasive Sensor for Hydrogen Peroxide and pH.

Further information on the meeting is available online.

SPIE Quantum Communications and Quantum Imaging XIII Conference

brantgibson9 August 2015:

A/Prof Brant Gibson, CNBP CI,  presented a paper at the SPIE Quantum Communications and Quantum Imaging XIII Conference (OP416), San Diego, California, 9-13 August 2015.

The paper presented was titled: ‘Hybrid quantum photonic applications of nanodiamond.’

Abstract:

Fluorescent nanodiamonds (NDs) have a range of unique properties which make them highly desirable for bioimaging applications. Their fluorescence is produced via optical excitation of atomic defects, such as the negatively charged nitrogen vacancy centre, within the diamond crystal lattice. Possessing long-wavelength emission, high brightness, no photobleaching, no photoblinking, single photon emission at room temperature, nanometer size, biocompatibility, and an exceptional resistance to chemical degradation make NDs almost the ideal fluorescent bioimaging nanoprobe. I will discuss these exciting properties in detail and also give some examples of their nano-manipulation and integration with photonic materials for hybrid ND-photonic quantum applications.

 

CNBP makes mark at APNFO10

Wan Razali16 July 2015:

The 10th Asia-Pacific Conference on Near-field Optics (APNFO10), held July 7-10 2015 in Japan, saw significant CNBP representation and visibility.

Two Centre Chief Investigators gave invited talks:

Dayong Jin (University of Technology, Sydney) – Upconversion SuperDots for Nanoscale Biophotonics. 

Brant Gibson (RMIT University) – Nanodiamonds: Hybrid-Photonic and BioPhotonic applications.

CNBP PhD student Wan Aizuddin Wan Razali (pictured) also won the IAC Award at  APNFO10 for top Student Oral with Poster presentation. His topic – “Ultrasensitive Nanoruby Imaging using Time gated Luminescence Microscopy.”

Full conference details can be found here.