Tag Archives: award

CNBP researchers get commercialisation grants

19 December 2016:

CNBP researchers Prof Rob McLaughlin (pictured) and Dr Erik Schartner, have received funding for their research activity through the University of Adelaide’s Commercial Accelerator Scheme.

Through CAS, the University contributes up to $400,000 each year in cash to research projects with a commercial application. The funding is provided for proof of concept and early commercialisation activities, to promote translational research for impact, and greater industry engagement.

Funding details follow below, with additional information available online.

Smart needles for safer and more effective brain surgery
$80,000 awarded to Professor Rob McLaughlin (Adelaide School of Medicine and ARC Centre of Excellence for Nanoscale BioPhotonics )
A novel miniaturised imaging probe, so small that it can be encased within a hypodermic needle for use in neurosurgery, enables safer and more effective brain biopsies. Having already progressed this product to initial human in vivo studies, this high-tech medical device is ready to go through the regulatory pathways. If commercialised, it could service an estimated $200m market, creating new employment opportunities in South Australia, and better neurosurgery outcomes globally.

Cancer cell detector
$80,000 awarded to Dr Erik Schartner (School of Physical Sciences and ARC Centre of Excellence for Nanoscale BioPhotonics)
With 15-20% of breast cancer surgery patients requiring additional surgery to further remove tumorous tissue, there is a need for improved surgical practices that can also provide enhanced cosmetic outcomes. This technology offers a novel detection tool using optical fibre sensors that will differentiate between cancerous and normal tissues based on pH levels, to provide specific, real-time information to surgeons.

 

Barbara Kidman Fellowship awarded

sanam Mustafa28 November 2016:

University of Adelaide and CNBP Researcher Dr Sanam Mustafa has been awarded a 2017 Barbara Kidman Fellowship.

The University of Adelaide Barbara Kidman Women’s Fellowship Scheme is designed to support female academics to enhance and promote their career. The Fellowships are named after Dr Barbara Kidman who, at the time (1940s and 1950s), defied society’s expectations of women in scientific roles.

The Fellowship offers opportunities to enhance, maintain or re-invigorate research momentum, as well as assist successful recipients in applying for, and assuming, enhanced roles in the near future.

Further information on the Fellowship is accessible online from the University of Adelaide web site.

 

 

John Booker Medal goes to Dayong Jin

Dayong Jin  Low Res Edit 009617 November 2016:

Congratulations to CNBP Investigator Professor Dayong Jin who has been awarded the 2017 John Booker Medal by the Australian Academy of Science.

Professor Jin was described by the Academy as a world leader in his field, with his research opening up many opportunities in biomedical devices, early diagnosis and light-triggered nanomedicine.

You can read the full story of Professor Jin’s success in an article on the UTS news site.

Research by Degrees success

saabah-mahbub_lowrez14 November 2016:

CNBP PhD student Saabah Mahbub has won best poster prize at the ‘Research by Degrees Showcase’, an event held by the Department of Physics and Astronomy at Macquarie University.

Saabah’s poster was titled ‘Label-free functional characterization of stem cell cartilage system by hyperspectral imaging (with unsupervised unmixing) for applications in regenerative medicine.’

Posters were assessed by external judges that included Mr Hugh Ong (Commonwealth Bank of Australia), Prof Fred Watson (Astronomer-in-Charge, AAO), Mr Steve Frisken (Finisar Corporation and Founder and CEO, Cylite Pty Ltd) and Dr Stephen Thompson (Lecia Microsystems).

Well done Saabah. Great work at showcasing your science!

 

 

 

 

Developing novel nano-tools to better understand the brain

guozhen_liu11 November 2016:

Understanding how the brain works is one of the greatest challenges of modern science – A challenge that CNBP Research Fellow Guozhen Liu is certainly up to!

She has recently been awarded an ARC Future Fellowship commencing in 2017 and will work on the creation of a suite of novel biomolecular nano-formulations capable of adaptive responses to the rapidly evolving environment inside of the body.

Read the full ‘Research Impact’ story on the Macquarie University web site!

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Enhanced glycosylation characterisation wins HUPO PhD prize

chris_ashwood-low-rez422 September 2016:

Christopher Ashwood, CNBP PhD Candidate, has presented at an industry seminar and won a PhD award for his poster at the Human Proteome Organization World Congress from 18-22 September 2016, in Taipei, Taiwan. The conference theme was “Precision Proteomics for Precision Biology and Medicine.”

Chris Ashwood’s presentation and poster were both titled “Improving confidence in glycan structure characterisation using alternative CID fragmentation.” Discussed was the use of new technology and innovative tools to enhance characterisation of protein glycosylation using mass spectrometry with applications in mammalian protein glycosylation.

Cell colour technology wins Eureka prize

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA31 August 2016:

Ewa Goldys, Deputy Director of the ARC Centre of Excellence for Nanoscale BioPhotonics (CNBP) and Professor at Macquarie University, together with Dr Martin Gosnell, CNBP research affiliate and Managing Director at Quantitative Pty Ltd have won the ANSTO ‘Innovative Use of Technology’ award at the 2016 Australian Museum Eureka Prizes.

They were recognised for their innovative colour focused research, able to distinguish between healthy and diseased cells, in areas as diverse as embryology, neurodegeneration, cancer and diabetes.

“We are absolutely thrilled to be awarded this prize out of such a high-quality field of researchers and scientists,” said Prof Goldys following the Eureka announcement.

“The hyperspectral imaging technique pioneered by our team lets us successfully extract specific biomolecular information hidden in fluorescent colour signatures of living cells and tissues.”

Goldys explained, that with this research, a new window into the body had been opened.

“Through the approach we are taking, incorporating leading-edge microscopes, ‘big data’ and the high processing speeds of modern computers, we are able to noninvasively and rapidly detect major health conditions, across a wide variety of areas.”

The future of the research, Goldys believes is one of high-impact and significant possibility.

“These colour-based cellular and molecular measurements have the potential to be done in-vivo (in the body), expediting the potential for healthcare decisions based on the health needs of the individual and their unique biological characteristics.”

Concluded Goldys, “The really exciting thing is that while we are probing the very limits of our understanding of life at the molecular level, this technology also yields real world translational outcomes – outcomes that will support clinicians in making improved diagnosis and health decisions for patients.”

The Eureka Prizes are presented by the Australian Museum and reward excellence in research and innovation, science communication and journalism, leadership and school science. Prize winners were announced at an Awards Dinner at Sydney Town Hall.

 

Australian Museum Eureka Prizes 2016

Founders Lecture awarded to Thompson

Jeremy Thompson21 August 2016:

Congratulations to A/Prof. Jeremy Thompson (CNBP Chief Investigator at the University of Adelaide) who has given the Founders Lecture at the Annual Scientific Meeting of the Endocrine Society of Australia and the Society for Reproductive Biology (SRB), at the Gold Coast Convention Centre, 21st August 2016.

The Founder’s Lecturer is the SRB’s major plenary speaker at the Annual Meeting, with those awarded the Lecture, recognised for their significant contributions to the field of reproduction in Australia.

According to an announcement from the SRB Secretariat, Thompson is a “fantastic asset to the SRB and well deserving of the  Founders lecture award,” having been a proactive member of the SRB for over two decades and a “world renowned expert in embryo development.”

Further information about the Annual Meeting is available online.

 

Cell colour technology shortlisted for Eureka honours

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA29 July 2016:

Professor Ewa Goldys, CNBP Deputy Director and Dr Martin Gosnell, Quantitative Pty Ltd, have been selected as finalists in the prestigious Australian Museum Eureka Prizes, for their work in developing technology that enables colour to be used as a uniquely powerful diagnostic tool in medicine.

Selected in the award category ‘2016 ANSTO Eureka Prize for Innovative Use of Technology’, Goldys and Gosnell use modern day microscopes and powerful computer analysis to explore the subtle colour differentiations of cells and tissue, down to a molecular level.

“With our pioneering hyperspectral imaging technique we are able to unveil the biomolecular composition of cells and their nanoscale contents,” said Ewa Goldys, Deputy Director of the ARC Centre of Excellence for Nanoscale BioPhotonics (CNBP) and a Professor at Macquarie University.

“This lets us distinguish between healthy and diseased cells in areas as diverse as embryology, neurodegeneration, cancer and diabetes. Key is the great potential of this technology to impact positively on lives – supporting clinicians in making improved diagnosis and health decisions for patients.”

Noting that it was a pleasure and a privilege to be nominated as a Eureka finalist, Goldys concluded, “Our innovative methodology is letting us probe the very limits of our understanding of life at the molecular level. It’s important that we share these amazing discoveries with the public and the community at large – the Eureka Prizes are the perfect platform to help support us in these efforts.”

Dr Martin Gosnell, CNBP research affiliate and Managing Director at Quantitative Pty Ltd was equally pleased by the Eureka nomination.

“I’m absolutely delighted that our research has been recognised at this level. By using the colour of light from cells and tissues, we are pushing the very frontiers of molecular exploration and measurement.”

“Our high-powered data analysis and imaging expertise is truly opening up new windows into the body.”

The Eureka Prizes are presented by the Australian Museum and reward excellence in research and innovation, science communication and journalism, leadership and school science.

Prize winners will be announced at an Awards Dinner at Sydney Town Hall on Wednesday 31 August 2016.