Aimé-Cotton Laboratory talk

17 May 2017:

CNBP’s Dr Philipp Reineck has given a talk at the Aimé-Cotton Laboratory (LAC), Paris, which he is  currently visiting as a guest researcher.

The laboratory is a joint research unit of the National Center for Scientific Research (CNRS), the University of Paris-Sud and the Ecole Normale Supérieure de Cachan.

Philipp’s talk consisted of an overview of CNBP science and more specifically, focused on Centre projects across the nano-diamond sensing and bio-imaging space.

 

China visit by Centre researcher

16 May 2017:

On a recent trip to China, CNBP Research Fellow A/Prof Guozhen Liu undertook a number of visits and talks, discussing her advanced sensing, nano-particle and bio-imaging work. This included:

5 May-8 May: Attendance at the International Congress on Analytical Sciences 2017 (ICAS2017) at Kaikou, China. Here Guozhen gave an oral presentation with the title “Engineering reduced graphen oxides towards a label-free electrochemical immunosensor for detection of tumor necrosis factor-alpha.”

11 May: Guozhen gave an invited talk titled, “Nanotools for cytokine monitoring in neuroscience” at Prof Zhihong Zhang’s research team at Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan. Prof Zhang is one of CNBP’s Partner Investigators at HUST.

13-14 May: Guozhen provided a keynote speech, titled, “An optical fibre based ex-vivo device for detection of cytokines” at the 2nd International Congress on Biomedical Imaging and Signal Processing (ICBISP 2017) at Wuhan.

Below: A/Prof Guozhen Liu (right) visiting CNBP Partner Investigator Prof Zhihong Zhang.

 

Post-operative pain management

10 May 2017:

Dr Sanam Mustafa, CNBP Researcher, presented an invited keynote lecture at the Royal Australasian College of Surgeons 86th Annual Scientific Congress, 10 May 2017.

Her talk was titled, “Recent developments in post-operative pain management – should we be worried?” and discussed the implications of using morphine for neuropathic pain.

The Congress took place at the Adelaide Convention Centre, Adelaide, South Australia.

European nanoparticle conference

10 May 2017:

Dr Philipp Reineck, CNBP Research Fellow, has given an invited  talk at the ENM Nanoparticle meeting in San Sebastian in Spain, 10 May 2017.

His talk was titled, ‘Near-IR fluorescent nanomaterials for bioimaging and sensing applications.’ Dr Reineck also chaired a workshop/session on nanoparticles for optical bioimaging.

Further information on the conference can be found online.

Best poster award

1 May 2017:

Dr Philipp Reineck, CNBP Researcher at RMIT University has won  best poster award at the 5th International Conference on Biophotonics (ICOB 2017), 30 April – 1 May 2017, Fremantle, Western Australia.

The poster reported on recent advances in the development and use of near-infrared fluorescent nanomaterials for biomedical imaging and sensing applications.

Dr Reineck was originally invited to give a short oral presentation about his poster, which was then selected as a ‘hot poster’ before the conference commenced. It then won ‘best poster’ resulting in a cash prize of $600 AUD.

During his short talk at ICOB, Philipp also discussed the potential of NIR fluorescent materials for wearables – for example, a watch that interrogates particles in bloodstream via near infrared light, to determine glucose levels.

Information about the ICOB conference is available online.

Maximizing particle concentration

28 April 2017:

A new paper from CNBP researchers reports on an improvement to deterministic lateral displacement arrays, which allows for higher particle concentration enhancement. The work has just been published in the journal ‘Biomicrofluidics’ and is accessible online.

Journal: Biomicrofluidics.

Title: Maximizing particle concentration in deterministic lateral displacement arrays.

Authors: Shilun Feng, Alison M. Skelley, Ayad G. Anwer (pictured top left), Guozhen Liu and David W. Inglis.

Abstract: We present an improvement to deterministic lateral displacement arrays, which allows higher particle concentration enhancement. We correct and extend previous equations to a mirror-symmetric boundary. This approach allows particles to be concentrated into a central channel, no wider than the surrounding gaps, thereby maximizing the particle enrichment. The resulting flow patterns were, for the first time, experimentally measured. The performance of the device with hard micro-spheres and cells was investigated. The observed flow patterns show important differences from our model and from an ideal pattern. The 18 μm gap device showed 11-fold enrichment of 7 μm particles and nearly perfect enrichment—of more than 50-fold—for 10 μm particles and Jurkat cells. This work shows a clear path to achieve higher-than-ever particle concentration enhancement in a deterministic microfluidic separation system.

 

Tuning third harmonic light

27 April 2017:

Researchers from CNBP and The Institute of Photonic Technology (lead author Stephen Warren-Smith pictured), have just had a paper published on tuning third harmonic light generated within exposed-core fibres.

Journal: Optics Letters.

Publication title: Nanofilm-induced spectral tuning of third harmonic generation.

Authors: Stephen C. Warren-Smith, Mario Chemnitz, Henrik Schneidewind, Roman Kostecki, Heike Ebendorff-Heidepriem, Tanya M. Monro and Markus A. Schmidt.

Abstract: Intermodal third-harmonic generation using waveguides is an effective frequency conversion process due to the combination of long interaction lengths and strong modal confinement. Here we introduce the concept of tuning the third harmonic phase-matching condition via the use of dielectric nanofilms located on an open waveguide core. We experimentally demonstrate that tantalum oxide nanofilms coated onto the core of an exposed core fiber allow tuning the third harmonic wavelength over 30 nm, as confirmed by qualitative simulations. Due to its generic character, the presented tuning scheme can be applied to any form of exposed core waveguide and will find applications in fields including microscopy, biosensing, and quantum optics.

The paper is accessible online.

IVF grant success

26 April 2017:

CNBP Chief Investigator, A/Prof Jeremy Thompson has received $7000 in travel support from the Global Connections Fund Priming Grants initiative.

The grant will fund travel to the USA to visit cattle IVF units with the aim of learning how they have made a successful business of in vitro produced embryos, and where it applies best in their (beef) breeding and genetic selection operations.

While there, A/Prof Thompson will be sharing knowledge and experiences and seeing if there are potential collaborative opportunities.

New nanoparticle discovery to aid super-resolution imaging

Prof Jim Piper26 April 2017:

Researchers at the ARC Centre of Excellence for Nanoscale BioPhotonics (CNBP), Macquarie University, the University of Technology Sydney (UTS), Peking University and Shanghai Jiao-tong University have made a breakthrough in the development of practical super-resolution optical microscopy that will pave the way for the detailed study of live cells and organisms, on a scale 10 times smaller than can currently be achieved with conventional microscopy.

Reported in Nature, the international team of researchers has demonstrated that bright luminescent nanoparticles can be switched on and off using a low-power infrared laser beam, and used to achieve images with a super resolution of 28nm.

Professor Jim Piper (pictured), leader of the research team at Macquarie University and the CNBP sees these nanoparticles as having new unique properties. “These allow researchers to see well beyond normal limits of standard microscopes. It will let you see deeper and more clearly at the cellular and intra- cellular level—where proteins, antibodies and enzymes ultimately run the machinery of life.”

The research featured in BioPhotonics World.

Light-triggerable liposomes

21 April 2017:

A new paper from CNBP researchers (lead author Wenjie Chen pictured) reports on the design of a new light-triggerable liposome. The work has just been published in the journal ‘Molecular Therapy: Nucleic Acid’ and is accessible online.

Journal: Molecular Therapy: Nucleic Acid.

Title: Light-triggerable liposomes for enhanced endo/lysosomal escape and gene silencing in PC12 cells.

Authors: Wenjie Chen, Wei Deng, Ewa M. Goldys.

Abstract: Liposomes are an effective gene/drug delivery system, widely used in biomedical applications including gene therapy and chemotherapy. Here we designed a photo-responsive liposome (lipVP) loaded with a photosensitizer verteporfin (VP). This photosensitizer is clinically approved for photodynamic therapy (PDT). LipVP was employed as a DNA carrier for pituitary adenylyl cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) receptor 1 (PAC1R) gene knockdown in PC12 cells. This has been done by incorporating PAC1R antisense oligonucleotides inside the lipVP cavity. Cells which have taken up the lipVP were exposed to light from a UV light source. As a result of this exposure, reactive oxygen species (ROS) were generated from VP, destabilising the endo/lysosomal membranes and enhancing the liposomal release of antisense DNA into the cytoplasm. Endo/lysosomal escape of DNA was documented at different time points based on quantitative analysis of colocalization between fluorescently labelled DNA and endo/lysosomes. The released antisense oligonucleotides were found to silence PAC1R mRNA. The efficiency of this photo-induced gene silencing was demonstrated by a 74 ± 5% decrease in PAC1R fluorescence intensity. Following the light-induced DNA transfer into cells, cell differentiation with exposure to two kinds of PACAP peptides was observed to determine the cell phenotypic change after PAC1R gene knockdown.