Category Archives: UTS

Science on show – what’s on in National Science Week

7 August 2019:

The CNBP and its researchers are taking part in a wide range of activities for National Science Week.

This Thursday 8 August researcher Dr Wei Deng from UNSW Sydney will explain how nanotechnogy is changing how we treat cancer, as part of Inspiring Australia’s Talking Science series.

It will be held at the Max Webber Library, in Blacktown, Sydney. More details here.

On Sunday, 11 August, Adelaide University’s Lyndsey Collins-Praino will host Kids Navigate Neuroscience, an event at which children aged 4-10 can explore how the brain works in a fun and hands-on way by participating in a series of interactive neuroscience exhibits.

You can find out more about the event here. Bookings are essential and can be made through Eventbrite.

On Tuesday 13 August explore medical brain research by joining Dr Lindsay Parker, a researcher at Macquarie University, as she discusses how she is trying to create better medicines for Alzheimer’s, chronic pain and brain cancer, by only targeting the unhealthy cells in the brain.

This event is part of Inspiring Australia’s Talking Science series as part of National Science Week. Bookings available now. Contact details:
Castle Hill Library
The Hills Shire Library Service
Email: libraryseminars@thehills.nsw.gov.au
Phone: 02 9761 4510
https://www.scienceweek.net.au/exploring-medical-brain-research/

There is a fun evening next Friday, 16 August, at the Adelaide Medical School, University of Adelaide, where you can explore the neuroscience of sex, drugs and salsa dancing.

A series of interactive exhibits will address questions such as, what role does the brain play in sexual attraction? Can you salsa dance your way to a healthy brain? How does the brain perceive different flavours when drinking wine, and how can pairing wine with different foods alter this perception?

More details here and bookings are through Eventbrite.

Also next Friday, 16 August, the whole family is invited to see some amazing short videos on a massive screen in a free National Science Week Event hosted by STEMSEL Foundation Braggs Lecture Theatre, University of Adelaide AI Light Science Spectacular.

You will find out how the eye works, how NASA finds planets in other solar systems and how detected the edge of the Universe.

You will also explore light, from nanoscale biophotonics with CNBP research fellow Dr Roman Kostecki to exploring the Universe with Dr Jerry Madakbas, a photonics physicist who builds night vision sensors for NASA.

You can book through Eventbrite.

Also on Friday night:

What role does the brain play in sexual attraction? Can you salsa dance your way to a healthy brain? How does the brain perceive different flavours when drinking wine, and how can pairing wine with different foods alter this perception?

These days, you can’t seem to walk through the aisle of a grocery store without being bombarded by newspaper and magazine headlines touting the latest and greatest breakthrough in neuroscience research. But how can you tell fact from fiction?

Join us for this Big Science Adelaide event, held at the Adelaide Health and Medical Sciences (AHMS) building at the University of Adelaide, where we’ll explore the answers to these questions and many more!

More details at https://www.scienceweek.net.au/neuroscience-at-night/ 
Finally, CNBP researchers will be taking part in Science in the Swamp, a fun, free family festival of science displays, shows and activities on Sunday 18 August in Centennial Park, Sydney.

Join scientists as they show what amazing superpowers you find in nature – super sight, super hearing, super strength and camouflage are only some of the capabilities on show.

Be sure to put on your cape and dress up as your favourite superhero for this great event. You can find out more details here.

Ground breaking hybrid nanocrystal work

Dayong Jin  Low Res Edit 00968 January 2016:

The top ranking journal ‘Nature Communications’ has published the latest ground breaking research from CNBP scientists with a paper titled, ‘Three-dimensional controlled growth of monodisperse sub-50 nm heterogeneous nanocrystals’.

The paper details the creation of  a library of over 800 newly shaped nanocrystals formed from ordered atom clusters over a period of three years. The different shaped or ‘hybrid’ nanocrystals will act as new tools impacting the areas of bio-imaging, diagnostics and nano-medicine.

According to CNBP Chief Investigator, Prof Dayong Jin, the work could form new solutions to getting around the body’s immune system response in the targeted treatment of cancerous cells, which causes both the healthy and diseased cells to die.

The full text of the paper is available online from the Nature Communicatons web site.

 

Centre CIs win Eureka prize

Eureka27 August 2015:

A team headed up by CNBP Chief Investigators Prof. Dayong Jin and Prof. Tanya Monro has been recognised for its innovative research in developing super-bright nanocrystals (termed Super Dots), winning ‎the Eureka‬ 2015 Prize for Excellence in Interdisciplinary Scientific Research.

The Super Dots team, consisting of Dayong Jin, CNBP, University of Technology Sydney and Macquarie University; Tanya Monro, CNBP, University of South Australia and University of Adelaide; and Bradley Walsh, Minomic International and Macquarie University, was awarded the prize for its work in the creation and use of nanocrystals that can illuminate hidden diseased cells in a living body and which also has application in the labeling, coding and authentication space.

Based on advances in diverse fields including material chemistry, optical physics, nanotechnology, biotechnology, computational modelling and instrumentation engineering, Super Dot technology is truly interdisciplinary in nature explained Prof. Jin.

“Our invention is a typical example of an interdisciplinary approach.  By sourcing advances in physics, chemistry and biology, we have been able to breakthrough bottleneck issues in material sciences and optical physics, allowing us to develop a new transformational technology.”

He added, “Research within a single discipline is interesting, but interdisciplinary research, working with collaborators with a shared focus as a team, is far more exciting and rewarding.”

Additional information on this winning team is available online from the Australian Museum – Eureka web site.

 

 

 

Professor Dayong Jin joins UTS

Dayong Jin  Low Res Edit 009625 May 2015:

Professor Dayong Jin, an ARC Future Fellow and Chief Investigator with the CNBP, has joined the University of Technology, Sydney (UTS) science faculty to grow the ‘Initiative for Biomedical Materials & Devices (IBMD)’, into an international collaborative network.

An interview with Dayong Jin on his new position and future goals can be found on the UTS web site – http://www.uts.edu.au/about/faculty-science/news/new-collaborative-science-expert-put-ibmd-world-stage