Category Archives: UNSW

Science on show – what’s on in National Science Week

7 August 2019:

The CNBP and its researchers are taking part in a wide range of activities for National Science Week.

This Thursday 8 August researcher Dr Wei Deng from UNSW Sydney will explain how nanotechnogy is changing how we treat cancer, as part of Inspiring Australia’s Talking Science series.

It will be held at the Max Webber Library, in Blacktown, Sydney. More details here.

On Sunday, 11 August, Adelaide University’s Lyndsey Collins-Praino will host Kids Navigate Neuroscience, an event at which children aged 4-10 can explore how the brain works in a fun and hands-on way by participating in a series of interactive neuroscience exhibits.

You can find out more about the event here. Bookings are essential and can be made through Eventbrite.

On Tuesday 13 August explore medical brain research by joining Dr Lindsay Parker, a researcher at Macquarie University, as she discusses how she is trying to create better medicines for Alzheimer’s, chronic pain and brain cancer, by only targeting the unhealthy cells in the brain.

This event is part of Inspiring Australia’s Talking Science series as part of National Science Week. Bookings available now. Contact details:
Castle Hill Library
The Hills Shire Library Service
Email: libraryseminars@thehills.nsw.gov.au
Phone: 02 9761 4510
https://www.scienceweek.net.au/exploring-medical-brain-research/

There is a fun evening next Friday, 16 August, at the Adelaide Medical School, University of Adelaide, where you can explore the neuroscience of sex, drugs and salsa dancing.

A series of interactive exhibits will address questions such as, what role does the brain play in sexual attraction? Can you salsa dance your way to a healthy brain? How does the brain perceive different flavours when drinking wine, and how can pairing wine with different foods alter this perception?

More details here and bookings are through Eventbrite.

Also next Friday, 16 August, the whole family is invited to see some amazing short videos on a massive screen in a free National Science Week Event hosted by STEMSEL Foundation Braggs Lecture Theatre, University of Adelaide AI Light Science Spectacular.

You will find out how the eye works, how NASA finds planets in other solar systems and how detected the edge of the Universe.

You will also explore light, from nanoscale biophotonics with CNBP research fellow Dr Roman Kostecki to exploring the Universe with Dr Jerry Madakbas, a photonics physicist who builds night vision sensors for NASA.

You can book through Eventbrite.

Also on Friday night:

What role does the brain play in sexual attraction? Can you salsa dance your way to a healthy brain? How does the brain perceive different flavours when drinking wine, and how can pairing wine with different foods alter this perception?

These days, you can’t seem to walk through the aisle of a grocery store without being bombarded by newspaper and magazine headlines touting the latest and greatest breakthrough in neuroscience research. But how can you tell fact from fiction?

Join us for this Big Science Adelaide event, held at the Adelaide Health and Medical Sciences (AHMS) building at the University of Adelaide, where we’ll explore the answers to these questions and many more!

More details at https://www.scienceweek.net.au/neuroscience-at-night/ 
Finally, CNBP researchers will be taking part in Science in the Swamp, a fun, free family festival of science displays, shows and activities on Sunday 18 August in Centennial Park, Sydney.

Join scientists as they show what amazing superpowers you find in nature – super sight, super hearing, super strength and camouflage are only some of the capabilities on show.

Be sure to put on your cape and dress up as your favourite superhero for this great event. You can find out more details here.

Nanoparticle discovery another step towards personalised medicine

1 August 2019:

A team led by the CNBP’s Dr Guozhen Liu has developed intelligent biodegradable polymer nanoparticles, which can help monitor a cell-signalling protein, or cytokine, widely expressed in cancer cells. The technique can help with earlier diagnostics and even treatment and represents another step towards personalised nanomedicine.

The research integrates a specific fluorogen – a molecule that generates fluorescence and can be used for protein monitoring – with PLGA nanoparticles for the first time.

The fluorogen in question is a so-called “aggregation-induced emission” fluorogen, known as an AIEgen. Aggregation-induced emission (AIE), has become an important area of research since its discovery around 20 years ago. It describes an abnormal phenomenon, in which some compounds show greater fluorescence as they aggregate than when in solution, as is more common. These AIEgens provide superior advantages for biosensing and bioimaging.

The integration of the nanoparticle and the AIEgen could become an important tool in the relatively new field of medicine known as “theranostics” – a combination of “therapy” and “diagnostics” made possible through the use of nanoparticles and an important transition towards personalised medicine.

Dr Liu’s discovery, for example, detects high levels of the cytokine VEGF-A found in tumor cells, and monitors simultaneous photothermal therapy (PTT), in which heat is used to kill cancer cells, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as part of a whole package of early diagnostics and treatment of cancer cells.

It could be used in the future as a smart drug delivery system, with cancer drugs loaded in the nanoparticles for controlled and sustained release targeted precisely to a tumor.
In the future, Dr Liu believes it will be possible to develop the next generation of intelligent nanoparticles which can continually monitor cytokines and cytokine-triggered drug delivery while also carrying out deep tissue imaging.

Dr Liu is an ARC Future Fellow and Senior Lecturer at Graduate School of Biomedical Engineering at UNSW.

You can read the paper here.

Journal: Nanomedicine

Publication Title: AIEgen based poly(L-lactic-co-glycolic acid) magnetic nanoparticles to localize cytokine VEGF for early cancer diagnosis and photothermal therapy

Authors: Ma, K (Ma, Ke); Liu, GJ (Liu, Guo-Jun); Yan, LL (Yan, Lulin); Wen, SH (Wen, Shihui); Xu, B (Xu, Bin); Tian, WJ (Tian, Wenjing); Goldys, EM (Goldys, Ewa M.); Liu, GZ (Liu, Guozhen)

Abstract: Aim: We demonstrated a novel theranostic system for simultaneous photothermal therapy and magnetic resonance imaging applicable to early diagnostics and treatment of cancer cells. Materials & methods: Oleic acid-Fe3O4 and triphenylamine-divinylanthracene-dicyano were loaded to the poly(L-lactic-co-glycolic acid) nanoparticles (NPs) on which anti-VEGF antibodies were modified to form anti-VEGF/OA-Fe3O4/triphenylamine-divinylanthracene-dicyano@poly(L-lactic-co-glycolic acid) NPs. The 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), mass spectra, fluorescence, UV absorption, dynamic light scattering, transmission electron microscope and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry tests were used to characterize the NPs, and the bioimaging was illustrated by confocal laser scanning microscope (CLSM) and in vivo MRI animal experiment. Results: This system was capable to recognize the overexpressed VEGF-A as low as 68pg/ml in different cell lines with good selectivity and photothermal therapy effect. Conclusion: These ultrasensitive theranostic NPs were able to identify tumor cells by fluorescence imaging and MRI, and destroy tumors under near infrared illumination.

Keywords:
Author Keywords: AIEgen; cytokines; MRI; PDT; PLGA nanoparticle; PTT; theranostics

KeyWords Plus: ENDOTHELIAL GROWTH-FACTOR; IN-VIVO; ANGIOGENESIS; THERANOSTICS; NANOSPHERES; APTASENSOR; EXPRESSION; PROGNOSIS; MEDICINE; PROBE

Link: http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcAuth=Alerting&SrcApp=Alerting&DestApp=WOS_CPL&DestLinkType=FullRecord&UT=WOS:000473676900008

New probe to detect hydrogen peroxide

10 June 2019:

A team of CNBP researchers have published a new paper discussing the design and application of a micro fabricated needle-like probe to measure hydrogen peroxide.  This new microfluidic tool has applications for monitoring dynamic chemical reactions in analytical chemistry and biological systems.

Journal: RSC Advances

Publication Title: Microfabricated needle for hydrogen peroxide detection

Authors: Shilun Feng, Sandhya Clement, Yonggang Zhu, Ewa M. Goldys and David W. Inglis

Abstract:  A microfabricated needle-like probe has been designed and applied for hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) sampling and detection using a commercial, single-step fluorescent H2O2 assay. In this work, droplets of the assay reagent are generated and sent to the needle tip using a mineral-oil carrier fluid. At the needle tip, the sample is drawn into the device through 100 mm long hydrophilic capillaries by negative pressure. The sampled fluid is immediately merged with the assay droplet and carried away to mix and react, producing a sequence of droplets representing the H2O2 concentration as a function of time. We have characterized the assay fluorescence for small variations in the sample volume. With the calibration, we can calculate the concentration of H2O2 in the sampled liquid from the size and intensity of each merged droplet. This is a microfluidic data-logger system for on-site continuous sampling, controlled reaction, signal storage and on-line quantitative detection. It is a useful tool for monitoring dynamic chemical reactions in analytical chemistry and biological applications.

Key words: Microfluidics, probe, H2O2, analytics chemistry

What is the potential for CRISPT/Cas Multiplex Biosensing?

29 May 2019:

Recent publication by CNBP PhD student Mr Yi Li and team at the University of New South Wales explores the challenges and opportunities of working with CRISPR /Cas for multiplex detection

Journal: Trends in Biotechnology

Publication TitleCRISPR/Cas Multiplexed Biosensing: A Challenge or an Insurmountable Obstacle?

Authors: Yi Li, Linyang Liu, Guozhen Liu

Abstract:  Performing multiplex detection is still an elusive goal for molecular diagnostics. CRISPR/Cas-based biosensing has demonstrated potential for multiplex detection. Instead of being an insurmountable obstacle, CRISPR/Cas multiplexed biosensing is a realistic challenge with some recent successful applications. Strategic considerations are required to fully explore its potential in multiplex diagnostics.

Key Words:

CRISPR/Cas; multiplex; biosensing; diagnostics; nucleic acid detection

 

New cytokine sensing device developed

1 May 2019:

A molecular imprinted polymer biosensing device (developed on stainless steel) that can successfully detect cytokines has been reported by CNBP researchers. Cytokines are proteins secreted by cells that stimulate surrounding cells into specific action and are important to an organism’s immune responses. The finding was reported in the journal ‘Sensors and Actuators B: Chemical’ with the lead author of the publication being CNBP’s Fei Deng based at UNSW Sydney.

Journal: Sensors and Actuators B: Chemical.

Publication title: Molecularly imprinted polymer-based reusable biosensing device on stainless steel for spatially localized detection of cytokine IL-1β.

Authors: Fei Deng, Ewa M. Goldys, Guozhen Liu.

Abstract: A molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) based biosensing device on stainless steel (SS) for detection of locally variable concentration of cytokine interleukin-1β (IL-1β) was successfully developed using a sandwich assay scheme. The SS surface was firstly modified with a layer of polydopamine (PDA) followed by the attachment of a layer of poly(ethyleneimine) (PEI) by electrostatic adsorption. Subsequently, the template protein IL-1β was adsorbed on the PEI terminated SS surface due to electrostatic adsorption. A PDA imprinting film was then in-situ synthesized on the surface of the modified SS substrate with incorporated template cytokine. Finally, the template was washed off the SS substrate leaving behind cavities with specific shape and capable of capturing cytokines thus forming a MIP biosensing interface. After exposure to the analyte IL-1β, the MIP biosensing device was incubated with IL-1β detection antibody-modified fluorescent polystyrene beads allowing to determine the amount of captured IL-1β based on fluorescence intensity. The device has been demonstrated to detect IL-1β with low detection limit of 10.2 pg mL−1, and a linear detection range of 25–400 pg mL−1. This MIP biosensing device can be regenerated more than three times with coefficient of variation 2.08%. The device was applied for the detection of IL-1β secreted by rat macrophages, where the good specificity and selectivity were achieved. MIP serves in this device as a superior substitute of antibody with exceptional stability and reusability. The MIP based biosensing technology presented in our work paves a new way for developing a universal and robust sensing platform for the detection of spatially localised small proteins with low physical concentration.

Non-invasive assessment of islet cells

2 April 2019:

Professor Ewa Goldys, CNBP Deputy Director, UNSW Sydney,  in partnership with Associate Professor Shane Grey from the Garvan Institute have received an international grant from JDRC  for “Noninvasive assessment of islet cells”.

This project will develop a non-invasive method for real-time monitoring of encapsulated beta cells in vitro and in vivo.  This will help assess the fate of implanted cells and define the conditions required to produce high quality insulin-producing cells for implantation and their precursors.

The results will lay the foundations for in vivo assessment of islet transplantation success.

Cutting-edge biosensing applications of CRISPR reviewed

14 January 2019:

A new paper by CNBP researchers and colleagues (including CNBP Associate Investigator Guozhen Liu, UNSW Sydney) reviews cutting-edge biosensing applications of CRISPR.

Journal: Trends in Biotechnology.

Publication title:  CRISPR/Cas Systems towards Next-Generation Biosensing.

Authors: Yi Li, Shiyuan Li, Jin Wang and Guozhen Liu.

Abstract: Beyond its remarkable genome editing ability, the CRISPR/Cas9 effector has also been utilized in biosensing applications. The recent discovery of the collateral RNA cleavage activity of the Cas13a effector has sparked even greater interest in developing novel biosensing technologies for nucleic acid detection and promised significant advances in CRISPR diagnostics. Now, along with the discovery of Cas12 collateral cleavage activities on single stranded DNA (ssDNA), several CRISPR/Cas systems have been established for detecting various targets, including bacteria, viruses, cancer mutations, and
others. Based on key Cas effectors, we provide a detailed classification of CRISPR/Cas biosensing systems and propose their future utility. As the field continues to mature, CRISPR/Cas systems have the potential to become promising candidates for next-generation diagnostic biosensing platforms.