Category Archives: UA

New Masters student

31 January 2017:

We welcome new Masters student Weikun Huang (pictured left) to the CNBP team at the University of Adelaide.

Weikun’s project aims to design and construct multiplexing microstructured optical fibre to quantify the concentration of metal ions (K+, Ca2+) and glucose. This paving the way for the monitoring of dynamic changes in extracellular and intracellular K+ and Ca2+ concentrations in real time and potentially establishing a new therapeutic strategy for type 2 diabetes.

CNBP Investigator Prof Heike Ebendorff-Heidepriem noted that Weikun’s project closley supported CNBP research in developing new sensors to answer important biological questions.

Weikun graduated from the College of Veterinary Medicine at Jilin University, China. As an undergraduate in veterinary medicine, he looked into the development of inflammatory response during fatty liver and subacute rumen acidosis, applying a series of biomedical techniques.

Welcome to the team Weikun!

 

New ‘smart needle’ to make brain surgery safer

20 January 2017:

A new high-tech medical device to make brain surgery safer has been developed by researchers at the Centre for Nanoscale BioPhotonics located at the University of Adelaide.

Led by CNBP Investigator Professor Robert McLaughlin (pictured), the tiny imaging probe, encased within a brain biopsy needle, lets surgeons ‘see’ at-risk blood vessels as they insert the needle, allowing them to avoid causing bleeds that can potentially be fatal.

Over the past six months, the “smart needle” has been used in a pilot trial with 12 patients undergoing neurosurgery at Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital in Western Australia.

Today, Education and Training Minister Senator Simon Birmingham, was shown the high tech needle and the laboratory where it was developed at a special event at the University of Adelaide.

“This smart biopsy device is an outstanding example of how our investment in research can translate into real benefits for industries and ultimately for Australians,” Minister Birmingham said.

A press release related to this activity can be viewed online, as can a YouTube video detailing  this innovative translational research.

Below – CNBP Director Professor Mark Hutchinson (left) and CNBP Investigator Professor  Robert McLaughlin (second right) look on as Senator Simon Birmingham (centre) explores the ‘smart needle device’.

 

CNBP researchers get commercialisation grants

19 December 2016:

CNBP researchers Prof Rob McLaughlin (pictured) and Dr Erik Schartner, have received funding for their research activity through the University of Adelaide’s Commercial Accelerator Scheme.

Through CAS, the University contributes up to $400,000 each year in cash to research projects with a commercial application. The funding is provided for proof of concept and early commercialisation activities, to promote translational research for impact, and greater industry engagement.

Funding details follow below, with additional information available online.

Smart needles for safer and more effective brain surgery
$80,000 awarded to Professor Rob McLaughlin (Adelaide School of Medicine and ARC Centre of Excellence for Nanoscale BioPhotonics )
A novel miniaturised imaging probe, so small that it can be encased within a hypodermic needle for use in neurosurgery, enables safer and more effective brain biopsies. Having already progressed this product to initial human in vivo studies, this high-tech medical device is ready to go through the regulatory pathways. If commercialised, it could service an estimated $200m market, creating new employment opportunities in South Australia, and better neurosurgery outcomes globally.

Cancer cell detector
$80,000 awarded to Dr Erik Schartner (School of Physical Sciences and ARC Centre of Excellence for Nanoscale BioPhotonics)
With 15-20% of breast cancer surgery patients requiring additional surgery to further remove tumorous tissue, there is a need for improved surgical practices that can also provide enhanced cosmetic outcomes. This technology offers a novel detection tool using optical fibre sensors that will differentiate between cancerous and normal tissues based on pH levels, to provide specific, real-time information to surgeons.

 

Director speaks at Novartis

16 December 2016:

The Director, CNBP, Prof Mark Hutchinson has given an invited talk at Novartis’ first “Think Without the Box” program in Sydney.

Consisting of a two hour meeting, Prof Hutchinson’s 45 minute presentation (“How do you know you are sick? How novel light based fibre sensing can help”), was followed by an hour long “brainstorm session” with the audience.

 

Director attends Melbourne Photonics Symposium

9 December 2016:

Professor Mark Hutchinson (Director, CNBP) has given an invited talk at the Melbourne Photonics Symposium held at the Singapore Theatre, Melbourne Design School, Melbourne, December 9th, 2016.

The title of his talk was “Using light to measure: lessons and examples from food innovation to advanced systems biology”.

The Symposium focused on the fundamentals, recent advances and applications of photonics, with an emphasis on biophotonics and attracted attendees from industry and academia.

Director attends ANS 2016 in Hobart

Mark Hutchinson_1_low_sq7 December 2016:

Professor Mark Hutchinson (Director, CNBP) attended the Australasian Neuroscience Society (ANS 2016) Conference in Hobart on 6 and 7 December 2016 where he presented a talk entitled “The ‘Toll’ of Knowing You are Sick: Microglial Innate Immune Signalling as a Key Contributor to Sex Differences in Pain and Analgesia”.

The Director also chaired a session entitled “Integrated Approaches to Treating Pain and Other Diseases of the Central Nervous System: From Targets to Circuits and Beyond”.

Spacial peptide imaging presented at ANS conference

7 December 2016:

CNBP PhD student Vicky Staikopoulos has presented a poster on preliminary work created from a collaboration between Hutchinson, Packer and Hoffmann labs at the Australasian Neuroscience Society 36th Annual Scientific Meeting hosted in Hobart 4-7th December 2016.

This work showcased CNBP and partner proteomic capabilities to measure with spacial topography, changes in identified peptide abundances throughout targeted pain processing areas.

This highlights the potential to identify many key peptides that may be involved in neuropathic pain development/maintenance that may have not been previously considered due to protocol limitations.

According to Staikopoulos this data was well received and a few scientists from various backgrounds were interested in watching this space.

Director speaks at joint meeting

Mark Hutchinson_1_low_sq5 December 2016:

Professor Mark Hutchinson (Director, CNBP) was invited to speak at the joint Australian Physiological Society (AuPS) and Australian Society for Biophysics (ASB) meeting held in Adelaide on 5 December 2016.

He participated in the symposium “Thinking Small: Seeing Biological Processes with Nanotechnology and Photonics”.

His talk was titled, “Using Light to Measure the Previously Unmeasurable Within the Central Nervous System.”