Category Archives: RMIT

Education session at Olympus Australia

Andy-Greentree-at-Olympus26 August 2016:

Olympus LIVE hosted a workshop today, involving a group of Quantum Physics researchers and  students from RMIT University and the ARC Centre of Excellence for Nanoscale BioPhotonics (CNBP).

It was the first microscopy workshop of its kind involving Olympus, the University and Centre, giving students valuable exposure and hands-on experience with resident Olympus microscopy experts.

The initial planning for the event was coordinated by CNBP Chief Investigator Prof Andrew Greentree from RMIT University (pictured top left) and CNBP industry partner Mr Jian Shen from Olympus Australia. The day consisted of a training/education session that was part of the ‘Masters in Nanotechnology and Smart Materials’ course, which is in its first year at RMIT University.

The event was hosted by Olympus at their state of the art new facility at Notting Hill, Melbourne and included a theory session, hands on training on microscopes run by Olympus experts, and a tour of some of the facilities.

It is planned that this will become an annual event as part of the ‘Masters in Nanotechnology and Smart Materials’ course at RMIT.

Said Prof Greentree, “This is just another way that the Olympus/CNBP partnership is providing benefits above and beyond that of direct research.”

 

Inaugural Professorial Lecture by CI Greentree

Andy-Greentree_web19 August 2016:

CNBP Chief Investigator Andrew Greentree presented to a full-house at RMIT University during his Inaugural Professorial Lecture on Friday evening, August 19th, 2016.

Over 150 colleagues, friends, family and members of the public were in attendance to hear about Andy’s innovative research, and to better understand the exciting potential of quantum technology and its many applications.

The inspiring 60 minute talk included live light-based demonstrations and a Q&A session with the audience giving Andy a heartfelt ovation as proceedings concluded. Informal feedback from guests as they departed was that the talk had been inspiring, educational and thoroughly enjoyable in nature!

Below – images from the event.

Andy-Professorial (1)

Andy-Professorial2

Successful CNBP workshop at RMIT node

RMIT workshopsq19 August 2016:

CNBP’s RMIT University node hosted CNBP researchers from Macquarie University and the University of Adelaide today, at a successful and well attended workshop event held in Melbourne.

A number of CNBP related projects currently taking place at RMIT were explored during the day long session, including presentations and discussion on the following topics:

  • Efforts to fabricate micro-optics for integration on multicore optical fibre imaging bundles
  • The potential of combining nano-photonics and biomedical acoustics to open new windows into the body
  • Use of of diamond lasers for sensing
  • Optimal search techniques when measuring at the nanoscale
  • The development of a molecular zinc sensor based on successful collaboration between CNBP chemists, physicists and biologists.

Other discussion points covered were diverse, and included but were not limited to – phone technology for fertility assessment, polarised endoscopes, spiky cholesterol crystals, 3D lens printing, bubble functionalisation, diamond laser sensing, conditional probability distribution, high-impact non-lame publishing via interdisciplinary collaboration and so much more!

Formal and informal networking took place throughout the day with new avenues for potential investigation captured. Thanks to all who participated on such a knowledge expanding day!

 

Open Day at RMIT University

IMG_6019final_sq14 August 2016:

CNBP’s RMIT University node had a highly successful Open Day experience, with more than 500 people passing through CNBP laboratories and work areas, with CNBP researchers on hand to discuss their science and explain more fully just what nano-scale biophotonics encompasses!

Activities included Associate Professor Brant Gibson introducing CNBP to groups of families, postdocs discussing their own photonics and biology research, students discussed the day to day life of lectures and labs, and Professor Andy Greentree greeting visitors at the elevator foyer with a giant spring and a leafblower.

According to CNBP node leader A/Prof Brant Gibson a real highlight on the day was seeing theoretical CNBP researchers in the labs, discussing their work to the public and explaining the experimental equipment used by CNBP on a daily basis, such as optics tables and lasers.

Below, CNBP researchers Emma Wilson and Ivan Maksymov discuss their science to members of the public.

Ivan and emma

Brightness and photostability of nanomaterials for bioimaging

Low Res Edit 010623 June 2016:

CNBP Research Fellow Dr Philipp Reineck (RMIT University node) is lead author on a new research paper, reporting on ‘Brightness and Photostability of Emerging Red and Near-IR Fluorescent Nanomaterials for Bioimaging.’

The work was co-authored by CNBP researchers A/Prof Brant Gibson, Dr Antony Orth and Dr Desmond Lau.

Journal: Advanced Optical Materials

Publication title: Brightness and photostability of emerging red and near-IR fluorescent nanomaterials for bioimaging.

Authors: Philipp Reineck, Adam Francis, Antony Orth, Desmond Wai Mo Lau, Reece David Valmont Nixon-Luke, Ishan Das Rastogi, Wan Aizuddin Wan Razali, Nicole Maree Cordina, Lindsay Marie Parker, Varun Kumaraswamy Annayya Sreenivasan, Louise Jennifer Brown and Brant Cameron Gibson.

Abstract:
Many novel fluorescent nanomaterials exhibit radically different optical properties compared to organic fluorophores that are still the most extensively used class of fluorophores in biology today. Assessing the practical impact of these optical differences for bioimaging experiments is challenging due to a lack of published quantitative benchmarking data. This study therefore directly and quantitatively compares the brightness and photostability of representatives from seven classes of fluorescent materials in spectroscopy and fluorescence microscopy experiments for the first time. These material classes are: organic dyes, semiconductor quantum dots, fluorescent beads, carbon dots, gold nanoclusters, nanodiamonds, and nanorubies. The relative brightness of each material is determined and the minimum material concentrations required to generate sufficient contrast in a fluorescence microscopy image are assessed. The influence of optical filters used for imaging is also discussed and suitable filter combinations are identified. The photostability of all materials is determined under typical imaging conditions and the number of images that can be acquired is inferred. The results are expected to facilitate the transition of novel fluorescent materials from physics and chemistry into biology laboratories.

The publication is accessible online.

Below – An artistic representation of nano-diamonds being used to light up and image a long chain of proteins. Image courtesy of Dr Carlo Bradac.

Nanodiamonds image

 

CNBP student recognised with biotech award

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA13 April 2016:

Congratulations to CNBP honours student Emma Wilson from our RMIT University node in Melbourne. Emma was recognised this evening with an award for her ‘Outstanding Achievements in Biotechnology’.

The Award is an industry sponsored award for academic excellence in the RMIT Biotechnology Degree, and it is awarded for best student performance overall.

Emma’s research is focused on investigating the peroxidase-like activity of Fluorescent Nanodiamond (FND) within a traditional bio-sensing assay.

Supervised by CNBP Chief Investigator Associate Professor Brant Gibson, Dr Philipp Reineck from the RMIT node of the CNBP and Professor Vipul Bansal, Group Leader of the RMIT NanoBiotechnology Research Laboratory, Emma is finding her work challenging but extremely rewarding!

“The opportunity to work under the guidance of these three scientists, each with their diverse expertise and perspectives is a great honour,” said Emma. “The award made for a fantastic evening.”

Acoustically-Driven Trion & Exciton Modulation in Piezoelectric 2D MoS2

Brant Gibson Low Res4 January 2016:

CNBP’s A/Prof. Brant Gibson (CNBP CI) and Dr. Desmond Lau (CNBP Technical Officer) featured as co-authors in a recently published paper in the journal ‘Nano Letters’.

The paper exploited the recent discovery of the piezoelectricity in odd-numbered layers of two-dimensional molybdenum disulfide (MoS2), to show the possibility of reversibly tuning the photoluminescence of single and odd-numbered multilayered MoS2 using high frequency sound wave coupling.

As such, the work reveals several key fundamentals governing acousto-optic properties of odd-layered MoS2 that can be implemented in future optical and electronic systems.

Additional information can be found in the Journal ‘Nano Letters’ online.

Electronic transport in Si:P δ-doped wires

Daniel Drumm Low Res Edit 012211 December 2015:

‘Electronic transport in Si:P δ-doped wires’ is the latest paper by CNBP Research Fellow Dr Daniel Drumm, published in the journal Physical Review B.

Abstract – Despite the importance of Si:P δ-doped wires for modern nanoelectronics, there are currently no computational models of electron transport in these devices. In this paper we present a nonequilibrium Green’s function model for electronic transport in a δ-doped wire, which is described by a tight-binding Hamiltonian matrix within a single-band effective-mass approximation. We use this transport model to calculate the current-voltage characteristics of a number of δ-doped wires, achieving good agreement with experiment. To motivate our transport model we have performed density-functional calculations for a variety of δ-doped wires, each with different donor configurations. These calculations also allow us to accurately define the electronic extent of a δ-doped wire, which we find to be at least 4.6 nm.

Further paper information is available online.

Wyatt Roy visits CNBP at RMIT

cnbplogosquare110 December 2015:

The Federal Member for Longman and Assistant Minister for Innovation Wyatt Roy, along with the Vice Chancellor of RMIT Martin Bean, toured the three new CNBP optics laboratories today.

They were shown CNBP’s custom confocal microscope setups including the cryostat which can be use to study light emitting properties of fluorescent nanomaterials from +70 deg C to -269 deg C. Also shown were autofluorescence images of a mouse oocyte (egg).

CNBP CIs Brant Gibson and Andrew Greentree briefly discussed the recently announced Australian Government’s Innovation Statement with Minister Roy and future commercial translation opportunities of CNBP technologies e.g. a ‘clinical version’ of one of the Centre’s custom confocal microcopes.

During the tour of the facilities, Minister Roy also met and chatted with many of the RMIT CNBP post docs and students.

Wyatt_Roy visit to RMIT