Category Archives: news

All public posts should be categories as NEWS – feeds into the “news” page

Brain Foundation research gift awarded

30 October 2018:

CNBP Associate Investigators Dr Lyndsey Collins-Praino (University of Adelaide) and Dr Andrew Care (Macquarie University), together with CNBP Director Prof Mark Hutchinson have been awarded a highly competitive Research Gift by the Australian Brain Foundation.

The funds granted will help the team to develop a new technique that aims to prevent the spread of Parkinson’s Disease in the human brain.

Below: Dr Lyndsey Collins-Praino and Dr Care accept their Research Award (with Prof Hutchinson in absentia).

 

 

Best ECR presentation award

26 October 2018:

CNBP’s Dr Nisha Schwarz, has won ‘Best ECR Presentation’ at the South Australian Health and Medical Research Institute (SAHMRI) Research Showcase event, held Friday 26th October.

Nisha’s presentation was ‘Colchicine in CVD : An Ancient Therapeutic With Novel Applications. But How?’ During the talk she revealed some insights on its mechanisms specific to atherosclerosis.

Below – Nisha (middle) with other prize winners on the day.

‘Ingenuity’ promotes STEM study

23 October 2018:

‘Ingenuity’, a public facing event run by the Faculty of Engineering, Computer and Mathematical Sciences (University of Adelaide) was recently held at the Adelaide Convention Centre and CNBP science was represented!

The University event, showcasing final year student projects and achievements, was attended by thousands of school students, industry representatives and members of the general public, with the goal of encouraging and fostering an ongoing interest in STEM related subject areas (science, technology, engineering and maths).

This year saw CNBP PhD student Kathryn Palasis participate at the event, giving two presentations to approximately 300 school students on her research (the design and development of photoswitchable drugs) and describing her time at the University, with the aim of encouraging students to pursue a career in STEM.

“It was fantastic seeing the energy and interest in the room,” said Miss Palasis. “The feedback from staff and students was extremely positive and it was great to share my research and scientific passion with them all.”

“Hopefully we’ll see some of these young scientists studying at the University and then showcasing their own exciting areas of research in the years to come,” she said.

Below –  CNBP PhD student Kathryn Palasis delivers her talk.

 

QST partner launch

15 October 2018:

The ‘National Institutes for Quantum and Radiological Science and Technology (QST)’ has been announced as a partner organisation of the CNBP at an official launch event held in Japan, October 15th, 2018.

The QST, a merger of the National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS) with operations that were previously undertaken by the Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), undertakes research and development into quantum science and technology, the effect of radiation on humans, radiation emergency medicine, and the medical use of radiation.

“The QST / CNBP partner launch was a huge success,” said CNBP Deputy Director A/Prof Brant Gibson, RMIT University.

“Our partner launch activities occurred over two site locations  of the QST – Takasaki and Chiba, Japan.”

“At the Takasaki ‘materials’ site I presented the CNBP partner plaque to Hisayoshi Itoh (pictured top left), Director General of the Takasaki site (Takasaki Advanced Radiation Research Institute).”

“Our delegation then moved to the Chiba ‘medical’ site of QST (National Institute of Radiological Sciences). There they have a medical high energy carbon irradiation facility – of which there are only two existent globally – the other is in Heidelberg in Germany. We had the opportunity to meet with Yoshiya Shimada, Executive Director of the entire QST at the Chiba site where I presented the CNBP plaque a second time,” he said.

The CNBP / QST partnership launch coincided with the launch of a 3 year International Research Initiative (entitled Quantum biosensors in wide bandgap semiconductors) between QST and researchers from RMIT, CNBP, The University of Melbourne, CQC2T and the Fraunhofer IAF.

“This initiative will focus on fostering strategic collaboration between Japan, Australia and Germany through short to long term visits from researchers focused in the area of quantum biology,” said A/Prof Gibson.

Below – A/Prof Brant Gibson with Yoshiya Shimada, Executive Director of the QST.

Below – QST and CNBP delegates pose for a partner launch photo at the QST Chiba site.

Glycan cancer research features on Nine News

13 October 2018:

Dr Arun Everest-Dass, CNBP researcher at the Institute for Glycomics at Griffith University has been interviewed by Nine News  about his glycan focused cancer research.

The interview took place during the Institution’s annual Glycomics Week activities, the aim of which is to draw attention to the significant glycan research taking place in the world of infectious disease, cancer and vaccine and drug discovery.

“It was a good opportunity to communicate our science to the wider community,” said Dr Everest-Dass.

“I explained to the news team our exciting new techniques and imaging technologies to help detect and analyse ovarian cancer. This is a key research area as ovarian cancer is the sixth most common cancer affecting Australian women.”

A clip of the interview can be found on the Nine News Twitter channel here.

CNBP tech transfer on show at STA event

11 October 2018:

CNBP science and it’s translation into exciting new commercial ventures  was on show at the ‘Science meets Business’ event held in Brisbane, October 11th, 2018.

The event, coordinated by STA, brought national and international corporate leaders and entrepreneurs, venture capitalists and angel investors together with Australian research and commercialisation pioneers, to help advance activity in the science and translation space.

First CNBP’er to present at the event was Chief Investigator Prof Jeremy Thompson who shared his amazing startup story in establishing the business ‘ART Lab Solutions’. The venture uses advanced reproductive technologies to accelerate the improvement of livestock quality.

Next up was the CNBP inspired start-up ‘MEQ Probe‘. Featuring presenters CNBP Director Prof Mark Hutchinson, Jordy Kitschke (CEO of MEQ Probe) and Susan McDonald (Managing Director of Super Butcher), all three discussed elements of the innovative start-up that offers industry an advanced spectral analysis tool that can objectively measure the quality of meat.

“MEQ is a story of success for the CNBP in bringing science together with business to solve a multi-billion dollar problem of objective meat quality measurement and assessment,” said Prof Hutchinson. “At CNBP we have made a conscious decision to actively solve real-world pain points, and engage entrepreneurs to turn amazing research into companies, of which MEQ Probe is an excellent example.”

A/Prof. Daniel Kolarich, CNBP Chief Investigator at Griffith University who also attended the event noted that, “Science meets Business impressively showed that translation does not necessarily correlate with the initial intention of the innovation – that the sky really is the limit when it comes to maximising return from research.”

Below: Smiles from the MEQ Probe team having completed their case study to an active and interested audience at ‘Science meets Business’.

Strong microwave photon-magnon coupling in multiresonant dielectric antennas

9 October 2018:

A new perspectives paper by CNBP researcher Dr Ivan Maksymov, RMIT University discusses dielectric resonant systems and demonstrates their ability to operate as multiresonant antennas for light, microwaves, magnons, sound, vibrations and heat.

Journal: Journal of Applied Physics.

Publication title: Perspective: Strong microwave photon-magnon coupling in multiresonant dielectric antennas.

Author: Ivan S. Maksymov.

Abstract: Achieving quantum-level control over electromagnetic waves, magnetisation dynamics, vibrations, and heat is invaluable for many practical applications and possible by exploiting the strong radiation-matter coupling. Most of the modern strong microwave photon-magnon coupling developments rely on the integration of metal-based microwave resonators with a magnetic material. However, it has recently been realised that all-dielectric resonators made of or containing magneto-insulating materials can operate as a standalone strongly coupled system characterised by low dissipation losses and strong local microwave field enhancement. Here, after a brief overview of recent developments in the field, I discuss examples of such dielectric resonant systems and demonstrate their ability to operate as multiresonant antennas for light, microwaves, magnons, sound, vibrations, and heat. This multiphysics behavior opens up novel opportunities for the realisation of multiresonant coupling such as, for example, photon-magnon-phonon coupling. I also propose several novel systems in which strong photon-magnon coupling in dielectric antennas and similar structures is expected to extend the capability of existing devices or may provide an entirely new functionality. Examples of such systems include novel magnetofluidic devices, high-power microwave power generators, and hybrid devices exploiting the unique properties of electrical solitons.

Publications masterclass gets top marks from attendees

9 October 2018:

CNBP has held a successful ‘Publications Masterclass’ for its PhD students, providing participants with a hands-on experience in preparing manuscripts for academic peer reviewed journals.

Hosted by Professor Andrew Greentree (RMIT) and Professor Tiffany Walsh at Deakin University, the two day masterclass (8-9th October) took 18 students through the publication writing process, provided tips on improving publication writing skills and included real time work-shopping of manuscripts.

“Feedback from the masterclass attendees was extremely positive with PhD students learning new skills and intending to integrate key learnings into their publications,” said masterclass coordinator, Kathy Nicholson, CNBP Chief Operating Officer.

“The residential nature of the two-day workshop also worked well and connected CNBP students from across University nodes helping build scientific relationships,” she said.

“Prof Greentree and Prof Walsh provided a wealth of knowledge and expertise which was the basis of this highly successful event.”

Below – Participants at the 2018 CNBP Publications Masterclass.publications masterclass

Nanoporous anodic alumina photonic crystals

4 October 2018:

A new review paper by CNBP student Cheryl Suwen Law (University of Adelaide) & other CNBP coauthors provides a comprehensive and up-to-date collation of fundamental and applied developments of nanoporous anodic alumina photonic crystals as optical platforms for chemo- and biosensing applications.

Journal: Nanomaterials.

Publication title: Nanoporous Anodic Alumina Photonic Crystals for Optical Chemo- and Biosensing: Fundamentals, Advances, and Perspectives.

Authors: Cheryl Suwen Law, Siew Yee Lim, Andrew D. Abell, Nicolas H. Voelcker and Abel Santos.

Abstract: Optical sensors are a class of devices that enable the identification and/or quantification of analyte molecules across multiple fields and disciplines such as environmental protection, medical diagnosis, security, food technology, biotechnology, and animal welfare. Nanoporous photonic crystal (PC) structures provide excellent platforms to develop such systems for a plethora of applications since these engineered materials enable precise and versatile control of light–matter interactions at the nanoscale. Nanoporous PCs provide both high sensitivity to monitor in real-time molecular binding events and a nanoporous matrix for selective immobilization of molecules of interest over increased surface areas. Nanoporous anodic alumina (NAA), a nanomaterial long envisaged as a PC, is an outstanding platform material to develop optical sensing systems in combination with multiple photonic technologies. Nanoporous anodic alumina photonic crystals (NAA-PCs) provide a versatile nanoporous structure that can be engineered in a multidimensional fashion to create unique PC sensing platforms such as Fabry–Pérot interferometers, distributed Bragg reflectors, gradient-index filters, optical microcavities, and others. The effective medium of NAA-PCs undergoes changes upon interactions with analyte molecules. These changes modify the NAA-PCs’ spectral fingerprints, which can be readily quantified to develop different sensing systems. This review introduces the fundamental development of NAA-PCs, compiling the most significant advances in the use of these optical materials for chemo- and biosensing applications, with a final prospective outlook about this exciting and dynamic field.

3D printing of OCT probes

4 October 2018:

A new paper published in Scientific Reports demonstrates the feasibility of 3D printing of optical coherence tomography (OCT) fibre-optic probes. Lead author on the publication is CNBP’s Dr Jiawen Li (pictured).

Journal: Scientific Reports.

Publication title: Two-photon polymerisation 3D printed freeform micro-optics for optical coherence tomography fibre probes.

Authors: Jiawen Li, Peter Fejes, Dirk Lorenser, Bryden C. Quirk, Peter B. Noble, Rodney W. Kirk, Antony Orth, Fiona M. Wood, Brant C. Gibson, David D. Sampson & Robert A. McLaughlin.

Abstract: Miniaturised optical coherence tomography (OCT) fibre-optic probes have enabled high-resolution cross-sectional imaging deep within the body. However, existing OCT fibre-optic probe fabrication methods cannot generate miniaturised freeform optics, which limits our ability to fabricate probes with both complex optical function and dimensions comparable to the optical fibre diameter. Recently, major advances in two-photon direct laser writing have enabled 3D printing of arbitrary three-dimensional micro/nanostructures with a surface roughness acceptable for optical applications. Here, we demonstrate the feasibility of 3D printing of OCT probes. We evaluate the capability of this method based on a series of characterisation experiments. We report fabrication of a micro-optic containing an off-axis paraboloidal total internal reflecting surface, its integration as part of a common-path OCT probe, and demonstrate proof-of-principle imaging of biological samples.