Category Archives: MQ

CNBP 2019 conference awards

Last week saw CNBP researchers come together from around the country for the annual conference in Adelaide.

The week culminated in gala where researchers were recognised for their achievements through awards ranging from academic excellence to commercial impact, outreach and collaboration.

Read about the awardees below, and congratulations to all our members who were recognised for their achievements in 2019!

Congratulations to the CNBP team!
Joint first author Denitza Denkova

2019 Academic Excellence Award Transdisciplinary Research Publication

Awarded to the best 2019 publication connecting CNBP researchers from multiple disciplines. This year’s award recognises a collaboration between researchers working with nanoparticles, microscopy, computational imaging and molecular & cellular biology.

Denkova, D., M. Ploschner, M. Das, L. M. Parker, X. Zheng, Y. Lu, A. Orth, N. H. Packer and J. A. Piper (2019). “3D sub-diffraction imaging in a conventional confocal configuration by exploiting super-linear emitters.” Nat Commun 10(1): 3695.

https://www.nature.com/articles/s41467-019-11603-0

First author Marco Capelli

2019 Academic Excellence Award – International Impact

Awarded to the best 2019 publication connecting CNBPs Australian researchers with International Partners. This year’s award recognises collaboration between researchers at RMIT University and QST, Japan.

Capelli, M., A. H. Heffernan, T. Ohshima, H. Abe, J. Jeske, A. Hope, A. D. Greentree, P. Reineck and B. C. Gibson (2019). “Increased nitrogen-vacancy centre creation yield in diamond through electron beam irradiation at high temperature.” Carbon 143: 714-719.

https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S0008622318310807?via%3Dihub

First author Yunle Wei

2019 Academic Excellence Award – Best Student Publication

Awarded to the best 2019 publication first authored by a CNBP student as determined by journal impact factor.

Wei, Y., H. Ebendorff‐Heidepriem and J. Zhao (2019). “Recent Advances in Hybrid Optical Materials: Integrating Nanoparticles within a Glass Matrix.” Advanced Optical Materials. DOI: 10.1002/adom.201900702

https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1002/adom.201900702

 

First author, Peipei Jia

2019 Academic Excellence Award – Best Researcher (non-student) Publication

Awarded to the best 2019 publication as determined by journal impact factor.

Jia, P., K. Zuber, Q. Guo, B. C. Gibson, J. Yang and H. Ebendorff-Heidepriem (2019). “Large-area freestanding gold nanomembranes with nanoholes.” Materials Horizons 6(5): 1005-1012. DIO:10.1039/c8mh01302k

https://pubs.rsc.org/en/content/articlelanding/2019/mh/c8mh01302k#!divAbstract

First author Abbas Habibahali

2019 Highest Altmetrics – Social Impact

Awarded to the 2019 publication recognised by the wider non-academic community, as determined by Altmetric score.

Habibalahi, A., C. Bala, A. Allende, A. G. Anwer and E. M. Goldys (2019). “Novel automated non invasive detection of ocular surface squamous neoplasia using multispectral autofluorescence imaging.” Ocular Surface. DOI:10.1016/j.jtos.2019.03.003

https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S1542012418302842?via%3Dihub

Patrick Capon

2019 Quality Communication Award – Social Media

Awarded to Patrick Capon (@PatCapon) for his diverse, informative and entertaining engagement with the @CNBPscience twitter handle.

 

 

Lindsay Parker

2019 Quality Communication Award – Engagement in Centre Outreach Activity

Awarded to Dr Lindsay Parker for community engagement activities including: Science in the Swamp, Exploring Brain Research at Castle Hill Library; and multiple engagements with school groups in Sydney and her home town in the USA.

 

Andrew Greentree

2019 Nurturing Environment Award – Mentor

Awarded to Professor Andrew Greentree for commitment to mentorship and contribution to CNBP professional development activities including the PhD Publication’s Masterclass, Research integrity training and supporting fellowship applications.

 

Georgina Sylva

2019 Nurturing Environment Award – 5% Commitment to CNBP

This award recognises individuals that go above and beyond CNBPs requirement for researchers to commit 5% of their time to non-research activities. Awarded to Dr Georgina Sylva for ongoing commitment to science outreach in regional and remote communities.

 

Heike Ebendorff-Heidepriem

2019 Commercial Impact Award – Individual Engagement with Industry/End-users

Awarded to a CNBP researcher for successful collaboration with industry and end-users. Prof Heike Ebendorff-Heidepriem for her disruptive glass projects with multiple industry partners and her collaborations with the glass-art community.

 

Tom Avery

2019 Commercial Impact Award – CNBP Project

Awarded for the most successful CNBP research project – industry collaboration. Dr Thomas Avery and Associate Professor Peter Grace for next gen non-opioid non addictive pain therapies.

 

 

Suliman Yagoub

2019 Photo/Video Competition Award

Awarded to the photo captured by Suliman Yagoub: Embryo staining for DNA repair #MicroFireWorks #Embryology @UniofAdelaide @UofA_embros
https://twitter.com/sulimanyagoub/status/1181446291491966977?s=12
@CNBPscience #cnbp2019photocomp

2019 Pitch Fest Award

CNBP pitch fest is the brain child of the ECR led Entrepreneurs Network. After participation in a CNBP-led pitching workshop, Individuals pitch their idea/project to the wider CNBP community with pitches judged by an expert panel.

2019 Pitch Fest presenters

Equal first prize:

Mr Suliman Yagoub: Towards Automation of in vitro Fertilization (IVF) Treatment.

Current IVF success requires skilled embryologists to perform regular, routine procedures. By automating and standardizing IVF procedures we will reduce human error for IVF treatments world-wide

Dr Andrew Care and A/Prof Lyndsay Collins-Praino: Intercepting Parkinson’s Disease

This novel technology employs bioengineered nanoparticles to halt the progression of Parkinson’s Disease inside the human brain.

Aimee Horsfall

2019 Annual Conference – Best Poster Award

Awarded to the best CNBP conference poster by popular vote. Aimee Horsfall – Poster: Enhancing protein biosensor sensitivity requires detailed structural insight.

 

 

2019 Director’s Award

Each year the Prof Mark Hutchinson identifies the individual(s) who’s contribution to the centre and/or support to the Director has stood out. Joint award to the CNBP Deputy Directors: Prof Brant Gibson & Prof Ewa Goldys for all-round awesome!

Cell surface sensors could advance precision medicine

1 October 2019:

Researchers have found a way to identify multiple cell signalling proteins using a single cell rather than the billions of cells used previously.

The new measurement technology, developed by researchers at the ARC Centre of Excellence for Nanoscale Biophotonics, brings precision medicine a step closer.

“Cells secrete various messenger molecules, such as cytokines. They may indicate the presence of a disease or act as a driver of key therapeutic effects,” says Dr Guozhen Liu, lead author of paper detailing the technology.

The method, termed OnCELISA, uses antibodies attached on specially engineered cell surfaces to capture cytokine molecules before they have a chance to disperse away from the cell.

The secreted messenger proteins such as cytokines are reported, at the single cell level, by using fluorescent magnetic nanoparticles.

Cytokines secreted from cells play a critical role in controlling many physiological functions, including immunity, inflammation, response to cancer, and tissue repair.

 

The image represents our sensor during the process of detecting cytokine molecules being secreted from cells. The sensor is represented by a pair of Y-shaped antibodies, the capture antibody (purple stem) and the detection antibody (pink stem).

The OnCELISA system can be used for ultrasensitive monitoring of cytokine release by individual cells, and it can also help discover cell populations with therapeutic value.

“The ability to identify and select cell populations based on their cytokine release is particularly valuable in commercial cell technologies and it can help develop unique products, such as future non-opioid pain relief” says Dr Liu.

“Importantly, our design uses commercially available reagents only, so it can be easily reproduced by others,” she adds.

While the published work focuses on specific proinflammatory cytokines IL-6 and IL-1β, the method is potentially suitable for a broad range of other secreted proteins and cell types.

The new technique represents an advance on traditional methods such as the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA) that detect average levels of secreted molecules from cell ensembles.

The OnCELISA takes the ELISA approach to its absolute extreme, by detecting cytokines on the surface of individual, single live cells.

The publication has been reported by prestigious iScience journal and can be found at https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S2589004219303578.

Journal: iScience

Publication Title: A Nanoparticle-Based Affinity Sensor that Identifies and Selects Highly Cytokine-Secreting Cells

Authors: Guozhen Liu; Christina Bursill; Siân P.Cartland; Ayad G.Anwer; Lindsay M.Parker; Kaixin Zhang; Shilun Feng; Meng He; David W.Inglis; Mary M.Kavurma; Mark R.Hutchinson; Ewa M.Goldys

Summary: We developed a universal method termed OnCELISA to detect cytokine secretion from individual cells by applying a capture technology on the cell membrane. OnCELISA uses fluorescent magnetic nanoparticles as assay reporters that enable detection on a single-cell level in microscopy and flow cytometry and fluorimetry in cell ensembles. This system is flexible and can be modified to detect different cytokines from a broad range of cytokine-secreting cells. Using OnCELISA we have been able to select and sort highly cytokine-secreting cells and identify cytokine-secreting expression profiles of different cell populations in vitro and ex vivo. We show that this system can be used for ultrasensitive monitoring of cytokines in the complex biological environment of atherosclerosis that contains multiple cell types. The ability to identify and select cell populations based on their cytokine expression characteristics is valuable in a host of applications that require the monitoring of disease progression.

Link: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.isci.2019.09.019

“Hackathon” to build interdisciplinary teams

16 September: By Dr Andrew Care

The 2019 BioNetwork “hackathon” Event was held last week at Macquarie University (MQ). The CNBP-sponsored event promoted interdisciplinarity between the different departments on campus in order to foster innovation and successful collaborations for early-career researchers. The event was modeled as a “hackathon”  in order to develop team building in an interdisciplinary context and develop new ideas based on challenges presented by clinicians from MQ Hospital.

The event hosted a prestigious panel of speakers, and included an opening address from MQ Deputy Vice-Chancellor (Research) Prof. Sakkie Pretorius and an introduction to the university’s health research priorities by Dr. Brenton Hamdorf, Director of Academic and Research Partnerships. Neurosurgeons and clinical researchers  A./Prof Andrew Davidson and A./Prof. Antonio di Leva presented modern challenges relating to brain cancer research. In the afternoon session, attendees had the opportunity to hear talks from Dr. Sumit Raniga on Orthopaedic Biomechanics and Prof. Lars Ittner on the new MQ Dementia Research Centre.

More than 60 attendants – including CNBP ECRs, came to the event during the day, a majority of which participated in the group activities which resulted in pitch presentations judged by a panel of experts. Generous contributions from the CNBP and others funded prizes for the pitch presentations and poster session, and collaborative grants for interdepartmental projects.

On behalf of the BioNetwork Organisation Committee we would like to thank all of the speakers, sponsors and attendees. We hope MQ and CNBP members will take part in this event again next year, and that the BioNetwork will become a useful outlet for networking and interdisciplinary collaboration on campus.

 

Image: DVCR Prof Sakkie Pretorius opening address 

How Bollywood boost Australia’s brainpower

3 September 2019:

In the 10 years since graduating with a degree in biotechnology from university in her home state of Odisha in India, Minakshi Das has covered a lot of ground – both physically and in her studies.

First she did her masters in Biomedical Engineering at Gachon University in South Korea followed by a year’s work as a research fellow at a biotech company. Continue reading

Super-resolution method could bring nanoscale microscopy to every lab

Friday 16 August:

CNBP researchers have unlocked the potential to transform microscopy at the nanoscale from a costly, complex option to an everyday laboratory tool, available in every lab.

The technique, described in a paper by lead authors Dr Denitza Denkova and Dr Martin Ploschner, which has been dubbed upconversion super-linear excitation-emission – or uSEE – microscopy, can be used not only for observation but also for the activation of biological structures with super-resolution.

This opens new avenues in optogenetics for precise activation of neurons in the brain or for targeted delivery of drugs with increased sub-cellular precision.

Standard optical microscopes can image cells and bacteria but not their nanoscale features which are blurred by a physical effect called diffraction.

Optical microscopes have evolved over the last two decades in order to bypass this diffraction limit; however, these so-called super-resolution techniques typically require expensive and elaborated instrumentation or imaging procedures.

“We have identified a particular type of fluorescent markers, upconversion nanoparticles, which can enter into a regime where light emitted from the particles grows abruptly – in a super-linear fashion – when increasing the excitation light intensity,” Martin says. “Our key discovery is that if this effect is exploited under the right imaging conditions, any standard scanning optical microscope can spontaneously image with super-resolution.”

The discovery addresses a key challenge for microscopy – the so-called diffraction limit. This prevents optical microscopes from seeing very small features clearly as, when the size and distance between the features start reaching the nanoscale range, they begin to blur together and appear as one.

And that is a problem for biologists to observe nanoscale samples – which is what researchers tackling some of our toughest health challenges need to do all the time.
Little wonder then that accessing the world that lies beyond this diffraction limit has become a holy grail for optical microscopy researchers over the past two decades.

In 2014, the Nobel Prize in Chemistry was awarded to three scientists, who developed three different techniques, capable of tricking physics to overcome the diffraction limit.
This landmark work set the scene for an explosion of so-called super-resolution techniques, which have led to revolutionary discoveries.

So far, however, all of these methods have had significant drawbacks. They are far from user-friendly and require either complicated and costly equipment or elaborated image processing, which often leads to imaging artefacts.

When it comes to 3D imaging, there are even more complications.

All the methods until now also require increasing the illumination power to increase the resolution – but that presents particular problems in the world of biology, where excessive light can harm a fragile specimen.

Denitza’s and Martin’s team took a novel approach to the problem. They wanted to make super-resolution possible on a confocal microscope, without set-up modifications or image processing, so that it would be available for use in any lab at practically no extra cost.

Their key discovery was that they could use a standard scanning optical microscope as a 3D super-resolution machine by imaging “upconversion” nanoparticles, potentially bound to the biological structure being studied. Unlike other super-resolution methods, uSEE microscopy offers better resolution at lower powers, and so minimises the damage to biological samples.

But it is not just the amount of light. Its colour also influences the photo-damage and the resolution. For example, UV- light is more harmful, but since it yields a better resolution, most of the super-resolution methods work in the UV and visible wavelengths.

However, in recent years biologists have become increasingly interested in using near-infrared light. It is less harmful and also allows imaging deeper in the tissue. But it does require a sacrifice in resolution, and the field of super-resolution has a very limited pool of fluorophores and techniques which work in the near-infrared regime.

Conveniently, the upconversion nanoparticles, on which the fluorescent markers employed in uSEE microscopy are based, are excited in the desired near-infrared colour spectrum. They are becoming increasingly popular as biological markers as they offer numerous other advantages for biology, including stable optical performance and possibility for multi-colour imaging.

Numerous papers have been published in the recent years about imaging of such particles for bio-applications. However, the effect of spontaneous super-resolution remains overlooked, mainly because the composition of the particles has not been fine-tuned for this application or the particles were not imaged under suitable conditions.

The CNBP team identified a particular nanoparticle composition which provides a strong improvement of the resolution. To make it easier for the end-user, the researchers developed a theoretical framework to optimise the particles and the imaging parameters for their own laboratory setting.

The concept of this method has been around for decades, and several groups have tried to put it into practice, but they either couldn’t identify fluorescent labels with adequate photo-physics, or the imaging conditions were not suitable to achieve bio-imaging in a convenient laboratory setting.

The CNBP team has shown for the first time that the technique can be used in a 3D biological environment, with biologically convenient particles which are both easy to work with and do not harm the samples.

This new methodological toolbox has the potential to go beyond the applications for which it has so far been used. It can be extended to a much broader imaging context, opening new avenues in the research of super-linear emitters and combining them with other imaging modalities to improve their performance.

Journal: Nature Communications

Publication Title: 3D sub-diffraction imaging in a conventional confocal configuration by exploiting super-linear emitters

Authors: Denitza Denkova, Martin Ploschner, Minakshi Das, Lindsay M. Parker, Xianlin Zheng, Yiqing Lu, Antony Orth, Nicolle H. Packer & James A. Piper

Abstract: Sub-diffraction microscopy enables bio-imaging with unprecedented clarity. However, most super-resolution methods require complex, costly purpose-built systems, involve image post-processing and struggle with sub-diffraction imaging in 3D. Here, we realize a conceptually different super-resolution approach which circumvents these limitations and enables 3D sub-diffraction imaging on conventional confocal microscopes. We refer to it as super-linear excitation-emission (SEE) microscopy, as it relies on markers with super-linear dependence of the emission on the excitation power. Super-linear markers proposed here are upconversion nanoparticles of NaYF4, doped with 20% Yb and unconventionally high 8% Tm, which are conveniently excited in the near-infrared biological window. We develop a computational framework calculating the 3D resolution for any viable scanning beam shape and excitation-emission probe profile. Imaging of colominic acid-coated upconversion nanoparticles endocytosed by neuronal cells, at resolutions twice better than the diffraction limit both in lateral and axial directions, illustrates the applicability of SEE microscopy for sub-cellular biology.

Link: https://www.nature.com/articles/s41467-019-11603-0

Science on show – what’s on in National Science Week

7 August 2019:

The CNBP and its researchers are taking part in a wide range of activities for National Science Week.

This Thursday 8 August researcher Dr Wei Deng from UNSW Sydney will explain how nanotechnogy is changing how we treat cancer, as part of Inspiring Australia’s Talking Science series.

It will be held at the Max Webber Library, in Blacktown, Sydney. More details here.

On Sunday, 11 August, Adelaide University’s Lyndsey Collins-Praino will host Kids Navigate Neuroscience, an event at which children aged 4-10 can explore how the brain works in a fun and hands-on way by participating in a series of interactive neuroscience exhibits.

You can find out more about the event here. Bookings are essential and can be made through Eventbrite.

On Tuesday 13 August explore medical brain research by joining Dr Lindsay Parker, a researcher at Macquarie University, as she discusses how she is trying to create better medicines for Alzheimer’s, chronic pain and brain cancer, by only targeting the unhealthy cells in the brain.

This event is part of Inspiring Australia’s Talking Science series as part of National Science Week. Bookings available now. Contact details:
Castle Hill Library
The Hills Shire Library Service
Email: libraryseminars@thehills.nsw.gov.au
Phone: 02 9761 4510
https://www.scienceweek.net.au/exploring-medical-brain-research/

There is a fun evening next Friday, 16 August, at the Adelaide Medical School, University of Adelaide, where you can explore the neuroscience of sex, drugs and salsa dancing.

A series of interactive exhibits will address questions such as, what role does the brain play in sexual attraction? Can you salsa dance your way to a healthy brain? How does the brain perceive different flavours when drinking wine, and how can pairing wine with different foods alter this perception?

More details here and bookings are through Eventbrite.

Also next Friday, 16 August, the whole family is invited to see some amazing short videos on a massive screen in a free National Science Week Event hosted by STEMSEL Foundation Braggs Lecture Theatre, University of Adelaide AI Light Science Spectacular.

You will find out how the eye works, how NASA finds planets in other solar systems and how detected the edge of the Universe.

You will also explore light, from nanoscale biophotonics with CNBP research fellow Dr Roman Kostecki to exploring the Universe with Dr Jerry Madakbas, a photonics physicist who builds night vision sensors for NASA.

You can book through Eventbrite.

Also on Friday night:

What role does the brain play in sexual attraction? Can you salsa dance your way to a healthy brain? How does the brain perceive different flavours when drinking wine, and how can pairing wine with different foods alter this perception?

These days, you can’t seem to walk through the aisle of a grocery store without being bombarded by newspaper and magazine headlines touting the latest and greatest breakthrough in neuroscience research. But how can you tell fact from fiction?

Join us for this Big Science Adelaide event, held at the Adelaide Health and Medical Sciences (AHMS) building at the University of Adelaide, where we’ll explore the answers to these questions and many more!

More details at https://www.scienceweek.net.au/neuroscience-at-night/ 
Finally, CNBP researchers will be taking part in Science in the Swamp, a fun, free family festival of science displays, shows and activities on Sunday 18 August in Centennial Park, Sydney.

Join scientists as they show what amazing superpowers you find in nature – super sight, super hearing, super strength and camouflage are only some of the capabilities on show.

Be sure to put on your cape and dress up as your favourite superhero for this great event. You can find out more details here.

CNBP research wins Young Scientist Award

18 July 2019:

CNBP research fellow Dr Lindsay Parker, of Macquarie University, has won an award for the best research paper from an investigator under 40, at an international conference in Rome.

Lindsay’s work is aimed at better understanding molecules ex-pressed in the brain during pain, brain diseases and brain cancer. This could lead to improved precision drugs that specifically target only the unhealthy cells in the brain.

She won a “Young Scientist Award” at the 41st PIERS (Photonics & Electromagnetics Research Symposium) held at the University of Rome in June.

Her paper, “Utilising Glycobiology for Fluorescent Nanodiamond Uptake and Imaging in the Central Nervous System” was in the category “Remote Sensing, Inverse Problems, Imaging, Radar & Sensing”.

The paper, in collaboration with RMIT University and the University of Colorado Boulder, investigated the ability of lectin-coated fluorescent nanodiamonds to recognise specific central nervous system cell types.

The prize included cash, and an invitation to the Symposium Banquet held at Palazzo Brancaccio. Lindsay also received travel awards from MQ University Primary Carer Support for Conference Attendance ($2000) and MQ Research Centre for Diamond Science and Technology ($1000) which meant her partner and baby William were also able to be in Rome with her as she worked.

While she was in Europe, Lindsay took the opportunity to give invited talks at the Czech Academy of Sciences in Prague and at the University of Groningen in Netherlands while visiting two other labs working in similar research areas to her synthetic nanochemistry expert Dr Petr Cigler and nanobiotechnology expert A/Prof Romana Schirhagl.

Shedding light on golden staph

3 July 2019:

A groundbreaking new technique will slash the time it takes to detect potentially lethal golden staph infection from two days to just two hours.

Researchers from the ARC Centre of Excellence for Nanoscale BioPhotonics (CNBP) targeted the bacterium with a luminescent DNA probe.

“This allows us to find the “needle in the haystack” because only the “needle” lights up,” says Dr Nima Sayyadi, Research Fellow at the Macquarie University node of the CNBP and lead author on the paper.

Golden staph, or Staphylococcus aureus, lives on the skin or in the nose. It is usually harmless, but if it enters the skin through a cut it can cause a range of infections, which in some cases are fatal.

Dr Nima Sayyadi in the lab

In the most at-risk patients, such as the elderly, it is vital to identify the infection and begin treatment with appropriate antibiotics as soon as possible. However, current identification techniques require culturing cells for up to two days to provide a positive infection result.

The new approach, known as Time-Gated Luminescent in Situ Hybridization (LISH), takes just two hours and could have a range of other applications. While it cannot yet separately identify drug resistance strains of golden staph, researchers are working on it.

CNBP scientists are also working on a range of transformational research projects based on the luminescence based detection of single cells in human body fluid samples, which will help them label antibodies and molecules as well as DNA.

“We’ve also done work in prostate cancer and bladder cancer where the target cell can be quickly and easily identified in urine samples,” says Project Lead and CNBP node leader at Macquarie University, Professor James Piper AM.

The research was reported in the journal Molecules, which you can read here.

Luminescent In Situ Hybridization (LISH)