Category Archives: MQ

New CNBP researcher at Macquarie University

25 January 2019:

CNBP is happy to announce its newest Research Fellow based at Macquarie University, Dr Simone De Camillis.

Simone will be working with CNBP Chief Investigator Prof. Jim Piper and his team to further explore the UCNP super-resolution technology for advanced biological applications, as well as collaborate across the wider CNBP community.

Simone completed his PhD at Queen’s University Belfast where he investigated ultrafast electrodynamics in nucleosides and aromatic amino acids. Studying the photo-chemistry of the building blocks of life is a fundamental step for understanding processes leading to mutation, damage and the alteration of the biological functions of the relative macro-molecule.

He has also worked as experimental physicist at the French Research Centre CEA in the optical characterisation of HgCdTe Infrared array detectors used for space and astrophysics applications.

His expertise includes femtosecond and attosecond laser technology, pump-probe interferometric systems, ultrafast molecular dynamics and time-of-flight mass spectroscopy.

Welcome to the team Simone!

Light-based imaging in the body

22 January 2019:

Senior  indigenous students were given an insight into life as an academic researcher, as well as provided with an overview of light-based imaging in the body, following an outreach presentation undertaken by CNBP’s Dr Annemarie Nadort at Macquarie University.

Dr Nadort’s presentation (the challenge of exploring blood as it circulates through the body) and hands-on demonstration of a clinical micro-circulation imager supported Walanga Muru’s ‘Camp Aspire’ program. Camp Aspire sees approximately fifty Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students (in Year 11/12) spend three days at Macquarie University to discover  tertiary options, explore the campus and make potential  connections related to future study.

“I hope to inspire students with my research journey as well as to  show them that a science degree can help open multiple doors when it comes to future career options,” says Dr Nadort. “The skills you learn at University are valuable and will stand you in good stead regardless of what you end up doing.”

Co-presenting the outreach session with Dr Nadort was Macquarie University’s Professor Orsola De Marco. She spoke to students about her own career journey as an astrophysicist and discussed the importance of tackling gender imbalance by encouraging more women to undertake STEM related study.

Below: Dr Annemarie Nadort explains the properties of light and how it can be best used to explore the inner workings of the body.

Cellular glycan surfaces in the central nervous system

17 December 2018:

A review paper by CNBP researchers (lead author  Sameera Iqbal pictured) reports on the examination of cellular glycan surfaces in the central nervous system and links to disorders and disease such as Alzheimer’s disease, multiple sclerosis and more.

Journal: Biochemical Society Transactions.

Publication title:  Understanding cellular glycan surfaces in the central nervous system.

Authors: Sameera Iqbal, Mina Ghanimi Fard, Arun Everest-Dass, Nicolle H. Packer, Lindsay M. Parker.

Abstract: Glycosylation, the enzymatic process by which glycans are attached to proteins and lipids, is the most abundant and functionally important type of post-translational modification associated with brain development, neurodegenerative disorders, psychopathologies and brain cancers. Glycan structures are diverse and complex; however, they have been detected and targeted in the central nervous system (CNS) by various immunohistochemical detection methods using glycan-binding proteins such as anti-glycan antibodies or lectins and/or characterized with analytical techniques such as chromatography and mass spectrometry. The glycan structures on glycoproteins and glycolipids expressed in neural stem cells play key roles in neural development, biological processes and CNS maintenance, such as cell adhesion, signal transduction, molecular trafficking and differentiation. This brief review will highlight some of the important findings on differential glycan expression across stages of CNS cell differentiation and in pathological disorders and diseases such as Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, Huntington’s disease, multiple sclerosis, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, schizophrenia and brain cancer.

Super-resolution volumetric imaging

11 December 2018:

The Australian Research Council (ARC) has announced funding for a super-resolution imaging facility that will be the first of its kind in Australia.

The facility brings together a consortium of multidisciplinary researchers from leading Australian Universities, Institutes and Research Centres (including CNBP) to develop new capacities for materials science, photonics devices, engineering, and neuroscience, microbial and cardiovascular research.

At its core the A$3.0m ARC LIEF project will enable scientists to study the inner workings of cells in their native environment. This represents a step change from currently imaging isolated 2D cells cultured in a petri dish to future research that will reveal subcellular structures and cell-to-cell communications in 3D tissue in real time.

The National Volumetric Imaging Platform, as it is known, will be installed, maintained and operated by the Institute for Biomedical Materials and Devices (IBMD) at the University of Technology Sydney (UTS) and the ARC Centre of Excellence for Nanoscale BioPhotonics (CNBP) at RMIT University in Melbourne. This project is scheduled to be completed in late 2019.

UTS Professor Dayong Jin, Lead Chief Investigator of the project, said that the facility will give scientists a “new way to decode the complexities of life science machinery.”

“High-resolution imaging of the large volume of single cells and functional navigation of their interactions will allow researchers to drop into a ‘street view’ and observe the details of intercellular ‘live traffic’,” he said.

Prof Brant Gibson, Co-Deputy Director and RMIT node director of CNBP said, “I am very excited to lead the RMIT University node of the National Volumetric Imaging Facility and to work in collaboration with Jin Dayong, the UTS node and all of our collaborative institutional partners. This facility will enable us to image deeper within biological samples than we ever been able to before, with nanoscale resolution and extraordinary bandwidth stretching from the near-UV (400nm) well into the infrared (1650nm) spectrum.”

Prof Mark Hutchison, Professor at the Adelaide Medical School and Director of the CNBP at the University of Adelaide said, “This is an exciting development of advanced imaging infrastructure capacity that will allow a convergence of scientists from across the country to gain an unprecedented level of molecular insights into the complex systems and arrangement of cells in biologically relevant complex 3 dimensional environments.”

Participating Organisations include: Universities: University of Technology Sydney, RMIT University, University of Wollongong, University of Sydney, The University of Queensland, The University of New South Wales, Macquarie University, The University of Adelaide.

Institutes and Centres: Institute for Biomedical and Materials Devices, ARC Research Hub for Integrated Device for End-user Analysis at Low-levels, Institute for Molecular Horizons, the Heart Research Institute, ithree Institute, Centre for Translational Neuroscience, Australian Centre for Ecogenomics, ARC Centre of Excellence for Nanoscale BioPhotonics.

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Expertise in microfluidic device development!

29 November 2018:

Meet CNBP’s Dr Lianmei Jiang in our latest ‘Quick Chat’ video! She’s developing advanced microfluidic devices for use in cancer diagnosis.

“What I love about science is the more that I learn, the more I realise how little I actually know. Science is a way to turn ‘I don’t know’ into ‘I don’t know yet’,” she says. Click to find out more!

Brain Foundation research gift awarded

30 October 2018:

CNBP Associate Investigators Dr Lyndsey Collins-Praino (University of Adelaide) and Dr Andrew Care (Macquarie University), together with CNBP Director Prof Mark Hutchinson have been awarded a highly competitive Research Gift by the Australian Brain Foundation.

The funds granted will help the team to develop a new technique that aims to prevent the spread of Parkinson’s Disease in the human brain.

Below: Dr Lyndsey Collins-Praino and Dr Care accept their Research Award (with Prof Hutchinson in absentia).

 

 

Medical Innovation Awards success

3 October 2018:

Dr Yiqing Lu, CNBP Associate Investigator at Macquarie University, has  taken out second place in the prestigious Centenary Institute Medical Innovation Awards.

The awards recognise the pursuits of young Australian researchers who are at the forefront of medical research.

For his work in developing a new nanocrystal powered optical imaging technique – to help detect multiple disease biomarkers in the body – Dr Lu received the Bayer Innovation Award and $15,000.

The money will be used to further support Dr Lu’s research in this advanced area of disease detection and diagnosis.

Further information on this innovative imaging technique can be accessed by clicking the following link here.

Below: Dr Yiqing Lu is presented with his award by Matt Kean, Minister for Innovation and Better Regulation (NSW State Government).

Understanding glycome changes in diabetic ovarian tissue

28 August 2018:

This paper describes the characterization of protein glycosylation in the ovary and measures the changes that occur with the induction of diabetes. The lead author on the paper is CNBP PhD student Abdulrahman M Shathili from Macquarie University (pictured).

Journal: Glycobiology.

Publication title: The effect of streptozotocin-induced hyperglycemia on N-and O-linked protein glycosylation in mouse ovary.

Authors: Abdulrahman M Shathili, Hannah M Brown, Arun V Everest-Dass, Tiffany C Y Tan, Lindsay M Parker, Jeremy G Thompson, Nicolle H Packer.

Abstract: Post-translational modification of proteins namely glycosylation influences cellular behavior, structural properties and interactions including during ovarian follicle development and atresia. However, little is known about protein glycosylation changes occurring in diabetes mellitus in ovarian tissues despite the well-known influence of diabetes on the outcome of successful embryo implantation. In our study, the use of PGC chromatography–ESI mass spectrometry in negative ion mode enabled the identification of 138 N-glycans and 6 O-glycans on the proteins of Streptozotocin-induced (STZ) diabetic mouse ovarian tissues (n = 3). Diabetic mouse ovaries exhibited a relative decrease in sialylation, fucosylation and, to a lesser extent, branched N-linked glycan structures, as well as an increase in oligomannose structures on their proteins, compared with nondiabetic mouse ovaries. Changes in N-glycans occurred in the diabetic liver tissue but were more evident in diabetic ovarian tissue of the same mouse, suggesting an organ-specific effect of diabetes mellitus on protein glycosylation. Although at a very low amount, O-GalNAc glycans of mice ovaries were present as core type 1 and core type 2 glycans; with a relative increase in the NeuGc:NeuAc ratio as the most significant difference between control and diabetic ovarian tissues. STZ-treated mice also showed a trend towards an increase in TNF-α and IL1-B inflammatory cytokines, which have previously been shown to influence protein glycosylation.

Profiting from the sugar coating of our cells

18 August 2018:

Shathili Abdulrahman, CNBP PhD Student at Macquarie University has won a prize for his talk ‘Profiting from the sugar coating of our cells: Immunology drugs as a case study’.

The successful talk took place at the ‘Third Saudi Scientific Symposium 2018’ organised by the Saudi Arabian Cultural Mission in Australia and held at the University of Sydney.

The symposium had the theme, ‘Aligning Research with Job Market Expectations‘ and aimed to develop the research of postgraduate candidate’s through networking opportunities with other researchers in the areas of Medical sciences, Engineering, Computer and Applied Social Sciences, and Humanities.

Further Symposium information is accessible online.

Light-based outreach at MQ Open Day

18 August 2018:

Light-based demos ranging from optical fibre lamps, to infinity LED light boxes, to UV light and a fluorescing scorpion were all on show to the general public and potential new students at the CNBP stand at Macquarie University’s Open Day.

At the stand, CNBP researchers took the opportunity to talk-up science and more specifically to explain the field of biophotonics, as well as discuss the value to society that CNBP research provides. Many potential students seemed to be particularly interested in possible career opportunities following a successful under-graduate science degree and were keen to find out more about jobs in the med-tech and general health and diagnosis arena.

In addition to the demonstrations and the informative CNBP science stand, the Centre was also represented at the Open Day science speed dating event. At this session, CNBP laboratory manager Dr Ayad Anwer discussed his science (hyper-spectral imaging work focused on exploring the inner workings of cells), to interested members of the public who had the opportunity to speak directly and in-turn with a room full of MQ University researchers.

Feedback from the Centre team who volunteered for the Open Day was that they had experienced an enjoyable time with many positive interactions, discussing their science and their life as a scientist more generally, to interested and engaged members of the public.

Below – The CNBP team get ready and prepped for Open Day!