Category Archives: media

Feeds in the “in the news” page on the website

Detecting hydrogen peroxide

19 March 2018:

A nanosensor that can detect hydrogen peroxide has been developed by CNBP/IPAS researchers by combining fluorescent nanodiamonds with organic fluorescent probes.

Importantly, cellular imbalance of hydrogen peroxide has been connected to aging and various severe diseases, including cancer, cardiovascular disorders, and Alzheimer’s.

The work is featured in the latest edition of MRS Bulletin with Patrick Capon from the University of Adelaide, co-author of the research study interviewed for the article (available here).

Turn your phone into a microscope

20 February 2018:

Australian researchers from the ARC Centre of Excellence for Nanoscale BioPhotonics (CNBP) have developed a 3D printable ‘clip-on’ that can turn any smartphone into a fully functional microscope.

“We’ve designed a simple mobile phone microscope that takes advantage of the integrated illumination available with nearly all smartphone cameras,” explains lead developer and CNBP Research Fellow at RMIT University, Dr Antony Orth.

You can read more about this exciting innovation at the leading technology web site Gizmodo.

 

 

New med-tech zinc sensor developed

29 September 2017:

A new zinc sensor has been developed by CNBP researchers, which will allow for a deeper understanding of the dynamic roles that metal ions play in regulating health and disease in the living body.

The research, published in the journal ACS Omega reports that the newly designed chemical sensor can detect and measure zinc levels in cells. It also has the functionality and portability to take continuous or repeated measurements within a single biological sample.

“This makes the sensor potentially suitable for use in future diagnostic tools that could open up entirely new windows into the body,” says lead author of the research Dr Sabrina Heng (pictured), Research Fellow at the ARC Centre of Excellence for Nanoscale BioPhotonics (CNBP), at the University of Adelaide.

Read more at PHYS.ORG.

Automated image analysis aids bladder cancer diagnosis

28 September 2017:

An automated image analysis technique has been developed by CNBP researchers (lead researcher Dr Martin Gosnell pictured) that is able to aid in the diagnosis of bladder cancer, and could potentially reduce the number of biopsies being taken unnecessarily.

Read the full article detailing the research and future opportunities, featured in Optics.org.

Want a better camera? Just copy bees!

4 July 2017:

Check out the latest buzz about bees and their extra light-sensing eyes! CNBP CI Prof Andy Greentree is coauthor on a new paper in PNAS, which identifies how the eyes and brains of honeybees work together, to process colour information.

“If we can design technology to mimic the way bees do this, we’ll be able to create better cameras and image-processing systems for drones and robots,” say the researchers in an article on the science news channel ‘The Conversation‘.

 

New nanoparticle discovery to aid super-resolution imaging

Prof Jim Piper26 April 2017:

Researchers at the ARC Centre of Excellence for Nanoscale BioPhotonics (CNBP), Macquarie University, the University of Technology Sydney (UTS), Peking University and Shanghai Jiao-tong University have made a breakthrough in the development of practical super-resolution optical microscopy that will pave the way for the detailed study of live cells and organisms, on a scale 10 times smaller than can currently be achieved with conventional microscopy.

Reported in Nature, the international team of researchers has demonstrated that bright luminescent nanoparticles can be switched on and off using a low-power infrared laser beam, and used to achieve images with a super resolution of 28nm.

Professor Jim Piper (pictured), leader of the research team at Macquarie University and the CNBP sees these nanoparticles as having new unique properties. “These allow researchers to see well beyond normal limits of standard microscopes. It will let you see deeper and more clearly at the cellular and intra- cellular level—where proteins, antibodies and enzymes ultimately run the machinery of life.”

The research featured in BioPhotonics World.

Nanoscale sensor detects disease

28 March 2017:

A new nanoscale sensor has been developed by CNBP researchers that can help detect cytokines — molecules that play a critical role in cellular response to infection, inflammation, trauma and disease.

Leader of the project A/Prof Guozhen Liu (pictured) said the release of certain cytokines by the body is frequently symptomatic of a disease or health-related issue. “Monitoring cytokine secretions at the cellular and subcellular level has enormous value in our understanding of basic physiology and how the body is actually working.”

The research featured in the online publication Photonics.com.