Category Archives: media

Feeds in the “in the news” page on the website

Cancer research to the public

20 May 2019:

CNBP AI at Macquarie University and Early Career Fellow at the Cancer Institute NSW, Dr Andrew Care, has presented his research to a packed house at a ‘Pint of Science’ public outreach and engagement event, 20th May 2019.

Held at the Nags Head Hotel, Glebe, Sydney, Dr Care talked about the latest in cancer research with a particular focus on a newly discovered class of biologically-derived nanoparticles (protein nanocages), and how they can be genetically-engineered to target and destroy tumours.

“Taking my science out to the public was great fun,” he says. “But more importantly it was a good opportunity to highlight that positive advances we are making in the fight against disease thanks to ongoing research investment in Australia,” he said.

Dr Care added, “I checked out Pint of Science for the first time last year. I saw a great talk by Dr Orazio Vittorio a cancer biologist from Children’s Cancer Institute Australia. After a chat at the pub about our research, we started a collaboration. A year later Orazio and I are developing an exciting new tool for cancer treatment! Together, we’ve also obtained research funding, and we’re about to file a patent and to publish our first paper together. None of this would have possible without Pint!”

“Talking at Pint of Science this year is my way of giving back and saying thanks for making a great collaboration happen…and maybe to find another awesome collaborator lurking in the pub again,” he concludes.

Dr Care’s research group combines techniques from synthetic biology and nanomedicine for the targeted treatment of cancer. More information on his exciting work can be found in his profile here.

Below – Dr Care presenting his research at Pint of Science, Sydney 2019.

Diagnosing eye surface cancer

24 Mar 2019:

A new automated non-invasive technique for diagnosing eye surface cancer (ocular surface squamous neoplasia or OSSN) has been developed by CNBP researchers and collaborators. The technique has the potential to reduce the need for biopsies, prevent therapy delays and make treatment far more effective for patients.

Read more in a news item on the Australian Medical Association website.

Osteoarthritis assessment to go hi-tech

14 March 2019:

Scientists from the CNBP have reported an advanced imaging technique that allows the condition of joint cartilage to be examined—right down to the molecular level. The technique has potential for diagnostics and treatment-planning of cartilage disease and impairment, including for osteoarthritis.

Read more from the news item posted on the Medical Xpress web site.

Glycan cancer research features on Nine News

13 October 2018:

Dr Arun Everest-Dass, CNBP researcher at the Institute for Glycomics at Griffith University has been interviewed by Nine News  about his glycan focused cancer research.

The interview took place during the Institution’s annual Glycomics Week activities, the aim of which is to draw attention to the significant glycan research taking place in the world of infectious disease, cancer and vaccine and drug discovery.

“It was a good opportunity to communicate our science to the wider community,” said Dr Everest-Dass.

“I explained to the news team our exciting new techniques and imaging technologies to help detect and analyse ovarian cancer. This is a key research area as ovarian cancer is the sixth most common cancer affecting Australian women.”

A clip of the interview can be found on the Nine News Twitter channel here.

Blood test identifies chronic pain

6 May 2018:

Australian neuroscientist and CNBP Director, Professor Mark Hutchinson who is developing a world-first blood test that identifies chronic pain by colour “biomarkers” is featured by NZ Doctor online. Prof Hutchinson believes that the breakthrough work has the potential to revolutionise the diagnosis and treatment for the one in five people in Australia and New Zealand who suffer from chronic pain.

Detecting hydrogen peroxide

19 March 2018:

A nanosensor that can detect hydrogen peroxide has been developed by CNBP/IPAS researchers by combining fluorescent nanodiamonds with organic fluorescent probes.

Importantly, cellular imbalance of hydrogen peroxide has been connected to aging and various severe diseases, including cancer, cardiovascular disorders, and Alzheimer’s.

The work is featured in the latest edition of MRS Bulletin with Patrick Capon from the University of Adelaide, co-author of the research study interviewed for the article (available here).