All posts by AJ Epstein

International Women’s Day – lessons from 6 years of building a nurturing environment

5 March 2020: By Kathy Nicholson

It is international women’s day this Sunday and, like many research organisations in Australia, we need to keep talking about Women in STEM.

Fortunately, from its foundation, CNBP has been focused on building an inclusive, diverse and supportive research environment.

Here’s some of what we have learned over the past six years. While it may seem overly simple, it is still remarkable how many of these things are not happening.

Hopefully these insights will provide you, not matter what stage of career you are in, with tools to create change. Continue reading

Producing a superior lamb roast

27 Feb 2020:

It’s not often that medical studies into better brain surgery can end up leading to lamb roasts that are a cut above. But that’s what research by Prof Robert McLaughlin‘s team at the Centre for Nanoscale BioPhotonics (CNBP) is doing.

‘I was telling Meat & Livestock Australia that we had this tiny camera in a needle that is great at seeing fat in tissue, but there aren’t many diseases where this is useful. And they got really excited,’ he said. ‘It turns out that the single biggest indicator of quality in lamb meat is the percentage of fat.’ Continue reading

Looking for the best in show

22 January 2020:

For a couple unable to naturally conceive, in vitro fertilisation is often the only option – but it’s one that involves months, even years, of hope intertwined with disappointment. Contributing to the ‘hit and miss’ are the eggs taken from fallopian tubes of hopeful mothers or donors: healthy eggs are essential for healthy embryos to develop into a pregnancy and, ultimately, a baby. Continue reading

Getting to the heart of disease

15 January 2020:

Coronary artery disease kills around 7 million people each year, making it the leading cause of death worldwide.

The culprit behind this life-threatening condition is build-up of high-risk plaque in the arteries which cause blood clots that block blood flow to the heart. But diagnosing this plaque before it becomes life-threatening is still a major challenge for medical practitioners. Continue reading