Monthly Archives: August 2018

Facile One-Pot Synthesis of Nanodot Decorated Gold-Silver Alloy Nanoboxes for Single-Particle SERS Activity

31 Aug 2018

Facile One-Pot Synthesis of Nanodot Decorated Gold-Silver Alloy Nanoboxes for Single-Particle SERS Activity
Junrong Li, Guannan Zhang, Jing Wang, Ivan Maksymov, Andrew D. Greentree, Jiming Hu, Ai-Guo Shen, Yuling Wang, and Matt Trau;
ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces; DOI: 10.1021/acsami.8b10112

https://pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/acsami.8b10112

Understanding glycome changes in diabetic ovarian tissue

28 August 2018:

This paper describes the characterization of protein glycosylation in the ovary and measures the changes that occur with the induction of diabetes. The lead author on the paper is CNBP PhD student Abdulrahman M Shathili from Macquarie University (pictured).

Journal: Glycobiology.

Publication title: The effect of streptozotocin-induced hyperglycemia on N-and O-linked protein glycosylation in mouse ovary.

Authors: Abdulrahman M Shathili, Hannah M Brown, Arun V Everest-Dass, Tiffany C Y Tan, Lindsay M Parker, Jeremy G Thompson, Nicolle H Packer.

Abstract: Post-translational modification of proteins namely glycosylation influences cellular behavior, structural properties and interactions including during ovarian follicle development and atresia. However, little is known about protein glycosylation changes occurring in diabetes mellitus in ovarian tissues despite the well-known influence of diabetes on the outcome of successful embryo implantation. In our study, the use of PGC chromatography–ESI mass spectrometry in negative ion mode enabled the identification of 138 N-glycans and 6 O-glycans on the proteins of Streptozotocin-induced (STZ) diabetic mouse ovarian tissues (n = 3). Diabetic mouse ovaries exhibited a relative decrease in sialylation, fucosylation and, to a lesser extent, branched N-linked glycan structures, as well as an increase in oligomannose structures on their proteins, compared with nondiabetic mouse ovaries. Changes in N-glycans occurred in the diabetic liver tissue but were more evident in diabetic ovarian tissue of the same mouse, suggesting an organ-specific effect of diabetes mellitus on protein glycosylation. Although at a very low amount, O-GalNAc glycans of mice ovaries were present as core type 1 and core type 2 glycans; with a relative increase in the NeuGc:NeuAc ratio as the most significant difference between control and diabetic ovarian tissues. STZ-treated mice also showed a trend towards an increase in TNF-α and IL1-B inflammatory cytokines, which have previously been shown to influence protein glycosylation.

Neuroscience At Night

19 August 2018:

Prof Mark Hutchinson, CNBP Director took part in the National Science Week event ‘Neuroscience At Night’, sharing neuroscience laughs, fun and serious science talk with adults and children from the community.

Profiting from the sugar coating of our cells

18 August 2018:

Shathili Abdulrahman, CNBP PhD Student at Macquarie University has won a prize for his talk ‘Profiting from the sugar coating of our cells: Immunology drugs as a case study’.

The successful talk took place at the ‘Third Saudi Scientific Symposium 2018’ organised by the Saudi Arabian Cultural Mission in Australia and held at the University of Sydney.

The symposium had the theme, ‘Aligning Research with Job Market Expectations‘ and aimed to develop the research of postgraduate candidate’s through networking opportunities with other researchers in the areas of Medical sciences, Engineering, Computer and Applied Social Sciences, and Humanities.

Further Symposium information is accessible online.

Light-based outreach at MQ Open Day

18 August 2018:

Light-based demos ranging from optical fibre lamps, to infinity LED light boxes, to UV light and a fluorescing scorpion were all on show to the general public and potential new students at the CNBP stand at Macquarie University’s Open Day.

At the stand, CNBP researchers took the opportunity to talk-up science and more specifically to explain the field of biophotonics, as well as discuss the value to society that CNBP research provides. Many potential students seemed to be particularly interested in possible career opportunities following a successful under-graduate science degree and were keen to find out more about jobs in the med-tech and general health and diagnosis arena.

In addition to the demonstrations and the informative CNBP science stand, the Centre was also represented at the Open Day science speed dating event. At this session, CNBP laboratory manager Dr Ayad Anwer discussed his science (hyper-spectral imaging work focused on exploring the inner workings of cells), to interested members of the public who had the opportunity to speak directly and in-turn with a room full of MQ University researchers.

Feedback from the Centre team who volunteered for the Open Day was that they had experienced an enjoyable time with many positive interactions, discussing their science and their life as a scientist more generally, to interested and engaged members of the public.

Below – The CNBP team get ready and prepped for Open Day!