Monthly Archives: June 2018

Rapid and sensitive SERS detection of the cytokine tumor necrosis factor alpha (tnf-α) in a magnetic bead pull-down assa

30 June 2018

Rapid and sensitive SERS detection of the cytokine tumor necrosis factor alpha (tnf-α) in a magnetic bead pull-down assay with purified and highly Raman-active gold nanoparticle clusters;
Yuming Lai, Sebastian Schlücker and Yuling Wang;
Analytical and Bioanalytical Chemistry;
DOI/10.1007/s00216-018-1218-0.

https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s00216-018-1218-0

Engineering the Slow Photon Effect in Photoactive Nanoporous Anodic Alumina Gradient-Index Filters for Photocatalysis

25 June 2018:

Engineering the Slow Photon Effect in Photoactive Nanoporous Anodic Alumina Gradient-Index Filters for Photocatalysis
Siew Yee Lim, Cheryl Suwen Law, Marijana Markovic, Jason K. Kirby, Andrew D. Abell, and Abel Santos;
ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces, DOI:10.1021/acsami.8b05946.

https://pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/acsami.8b05946

Fresh Science with a nano-diamond twist

20 June 2018:

Approximately 100 patrons at the Belgian Beer Cafe in Melbourne were treated to ten researchers showcasing their science as part of the ‘Fresh Science’ initiative (Victoria), June 20th, 2018.

One of those ten researchers was CNBP student Marco Capelli from RMIT University who was a successful applicant to Fresh Science – a program that trains early career scientists on how to best communicate and present their  activity to the media and to the wider general public at large.

Studying the brain using ulta-small diamonds was the scientific narrative practiced and delivered by Marco as part of his public presentation at the Cafe.

“Fresh Science was an amazing experience,” says Marco.

“Over the course of two days, I had the chance to interact with journalists from different media (including television, radio and newspaper) as well as representatives from industry and policymakers. From each of them, I learned how to tailor my scientific exposition to a variety of audiences, how to highlight my research and how to successfully pitch my ideas.”

“I particularly enjoyed testing myself in front of professionals from each field as well as receiving immediate feedback on my presentation skills. Fresh Science is an experience I strongly endorse to any ECR researcher (PhD students included) looking to improve their communication skills.”

Below: CNBP PhD student Marco Capelli talks nano materials at the Belgian Beer Cafe in Melbourne. Image courtesy of Science in Public (Fresh Science).

New X-ray-induced photodynamic therapy system

19 June 2018:

Researchers from CNBP have developed an X-ray-induced photodynamic therapy (PDT) system where nanoparticles incorporating a photosensitizer, verteporfin, were triggered by X-ray radiation to generate cytotoxic singlet oxygen. This system offers the possibility of enhancing the radiation therapy commonly prescribed for the treatment of cancer by simultaneous PDT.

Lead author on the paper was Dr Sandhya Clement (pictured).

Journal: International Journal of Nanomedicine.

Publication title: X-ray radiation-induced and targeted photodynamic therapy with folic acid-conjugated biodegradable nanoconstructs.

Authors: Sandhya Clement, Wenjie Chen, Wei Deng, Ewa M Goldys.

Abstract:
Introduction: The depth limitation of conventional photodynamic therapy (PDT) with visible electromagnetic radiation represents a challenge for the treatment of deep-seated tumors. Materials and methods: To overcome this issue, we developed an X-ray-induced PDT system where poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) polymeric nanoparticles (NPs) incorporating a photosensitizer (PS), verteporfin (VP), were triggered by 6 MeV X-ray radiation to generate cytotoxic singlet oxygen. The X-ray radiation used in this study allows this system to breakthrough the PDT depth barrier due to excellent penetration of 6 MeV X-ray radiation through biological tissue. In addition, the conjugation of our NPs with folic acid moieties enables specific targeting of HCT116 cancer cells that overexpress the folate receptors. We carried out physiochemical characterization of PLGA NPs, such as size distribution, zeta potential, morphology and in vitro release of VP. Cellular uptake activity and cell-killing effect of these NPs were also evaluated. Results and discussion: Our results indicate that our nanoconstructs triggered by 6 MeV X-ray radiation yield enhanced PDT efficacy compared with the radiation alone. We attributed the X-ray-induced singlet oxygen generation from the PS, VP, to photoexcitation by Cherenkov radiation and/or reactive oxygen species generation facilitated by energetic secondary electrons produced in the tissue. Conclusion: The cytotoxic effect caused by VP offers the possibility of enhancing the radiation therapy commonly prescribed for the treatment of cancer by simultaneous PDT.

 

New CNBP partnership announced

13 June 2018:

The ARC Centre of Excellence for Nanoscale BioPhotonics (CNBP) is pleased to announce that the Changchun Institute of Applied Chemistry (CIAC) is now a Partner Organisation of the CNBP with Dr Xiaohui Wang (pictured) leading the relationship from the CIAC side as a formal CNBP Partner Investigator.

Collaboration activity to take place between CNBP and CIAC will be focused in the areas of innate immune targeted biosensors and novel pharmacology. More specifically, CIAC expertise will feed into CNBP’s advanced research program exploring the impact of innate immune signalling in pain processing.

In a similar manner, CNBP will bring to CIAC and Dr Xiaohui Wang’s team a unique set of pre-clinical behavioural models and application areas that will advance the CIAC research program more broadly across the synthetic chemistry space.

Prof Mark Hutchinson, CNBP Director, noted that Dr Xiaohui Wang already possessed strong linkages with CNBP following Dr Wang’s visits to several CNBP nodes, and the decadal collaboration between the two researchers stemming from their time working together at the Center for Neuroscience at the University of Colorado, Boulder USA.

“I look forward to our future co-operative activity,” says Prof Mark Hutchinson. “CNBP and CIAC are an excellent strategic partnership fit in the novel innate immune targeted chemistry and pain-signalling space and I’m extremely excited to see where our joint research activity takes us.”

As a part of the partnership, CIAC will fund a full-time PhD student working on CNBP-CIAC related projects as well as provide additional research funding to support project activity and materials.

Below – Dr Xiaohui Wang.