Monthly Archives: June 2018

New X-ray-induced photodynamic therapy system

19 June 2018:

Researchers from CNBP have developed an X-ray-induced photodynamic therapy (PDT) system where nanoparticles incorporating a photosensitizer, verteporfin, were triggered by X-ray radiation to generate cytotoxic singlet oxygen. This system offers the possibility of enhancing the radiation therapy commonly prescribed for the treatment of cancer by simultaneous PDT.

Lead author on the paper was Dr Sandhya Clement (pictured).

Journal: International Journal of Nanomedicine.

Publication title: X-ray radiation-induced and targeted photodynamic therapy with folic acid-conjugated biodegradable nanoconstructs.

Authors: Sandhya Clement, Wenjie Chen, Wei Deng, Ewa M Goldys.

Abstract:
Introduction: The depth limitation of conventional photodynamic therapy (PDT) with visible electromagnetic radiation represents a challenge for the treatment of deep-seated tumors. Materials and methods: To overcome this issue, we developed an X-ray-induced PDT system where poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) polymeric nanoparticles (NPs) incorporating a photosensitizer (PS), verteporfin (VP), were triggered by 6 MeV X-ray radiation to generate cytotoxic singlet oxygen. The X-ray radiation used in this study allows this system to breakthrough the PDT depth barrier due to excellent penetration of 6 MeV X-ray radiation through biological tissue. In addition, the conjugation of our NPs with folic acid moieties enables specific targeting of HCT116 cancer cells that overexpress the folate receptors. We carried out physiochemical characterization of PLGA NPs, such as size distribution, zeta potential, morphology and in vitro release of VP. Cellular uptake activity and cell-killing effect of these NPs were also evaluated. Results and discussion: Our results indicate that our nanoconstructs triggered by 6 MeV X-ray radiation yield enhanced PDT efficacy compared with the radiation alone. We attributed the X-ray-induced singlet oxygen generation from the PS, VP, to photoexcitation by Cherenkov radiation and/or reactive oxygen species generation facilitated by energetic secondary electrons produced in the tissue. Conclusion: The cytotoxic effect caused by VP offers the possibility of enhancing the radiation therapy commonly prescribed for the treatment of cancer by simultaneous PDT.

 

New CNBP partnership announced

13 June 2018:

The ARC Centre of Excellence for Nanoscale BioPhotonics (CNBP) is pleased to announce that the Changchun Institute of Applied Chemistry (CIAC) is now a Partner Organisation of the CNBP with Dr Xiaohui Wang (pictured) leading the relationship from the CIAC side as a formal CNBP Partner Investigator.

Collaboration activity to take place between CNBP and CIAC will be focused in the areas of innate immune targeted biosensors and novel pharmacology. More specifically, CIAC expertise will feed into CNBP’s advanced research program exploring the impact of innate immune signalling in pain processing.

In a similar manner, CNBP will bring to CIAC and Dr Xiaohui Wang’s team a unique set of pre-clinical behavioural models and application areas that will advance the CIAC research program more broadly across the synthetic chemistry space.

Prof Mark Hutchinson, CNBP Director, noted that Dr Xiaohui Wang already possessed strong linkages with CNBP following Dr Wang’s visits to several CNBP nodes, and the decadal collaboration between the two researchers stemming from their time working together at the Center for Neuroscience at the University of Colorado, Boulder USA.

“I look forward to our future co-operative activity,” says Prof Mark Hutchinson. “CNBP and CIAC are an excellent strategic partnership fit in the novel innate immune targeted chemistry and pain-signalling space and I’m extremely excited to see where our joint research activity takes us.”

As a part of the partnership, CIAC will fund a full-time PhD student working on CNBP-CIAC related projects as well as provide additional research funding to support project activity and materials.

Below – Dr Xiaohui Wang.

Fluorescence microscopy gets the BAMM treatment!

7 June 2018:

A novel technique developed by researchers at the ARC Centre of Excellence for Nanoscale BioPhotonics (CNBP) will help shine new light on biological questions by improving the quality and quantity of information that can be extracted in fluorescence microscopy.

The technique, ‘bleaching-assisted multichannel microscopy’ (BAMM) takes a current long-standing weakness of fluorescence microscopy – photobleaching – and turns it into a strength that improves imaging output by up to three times, with no additional hardware required.

Reported in the journal ‘Biomedical Optics Express’ (lead author Dr Antony Orth, CNBP Research Fellow at RMIT University), BAMM will help researchers gain biological insights into the intricate processes taking place within living cells. This includes the interplay between proteins and molecules which have the potential to impact a wide range of health areas from fertility, to pain, to heart disease and more.

Publication authors: Antony Orth, Richik N. Ghosh, Emma R. Wilson, Timothy Doughney, Hannah Brown, Philipp Reineck, Jeremy G. Thompson, and Brant C. Gibson.

Read more about this innovative technique from our media release or access the publication online.

Below – This figure shows the information-rich cellular images made possible by using the newly reported BAMM technique. The ‘Original’ image shows cells containing multiple fluorescent targets, all having similar colours. This results in a monochrome image. With BAMM, photobleaching rates are colour coded red, green and blue for visualisation, so that each fluorescently labelled structure can be identified even though the fluorophore’s native colour information was never used.

Detecting glycosylated hemoglobin

Jagjit Kaur7 June 2018:

A new review paper from CNBP researchers (lead author PhD student Jagjit Kaur) outlines current research activities on developing assays including biosensors for the detection of  glycosylated hemoglobin  (HbA1c). Measurement of HbA1c is used for assessing long term glycemic control in individuals with diabetes.

Journal: Biosensors and Bioelectronics.

Publication title: Different strategies for detection of HbA1c emphasizing on biosensors and point-of-care analyzers.

Authors: Jagjit Kaur, Cheng Jiang, Guozhen Liu.

Abstract: Measurement of glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) is a gold standard procedure for assessing long term glycemic control in individuals with diabetes mellitus as it gives the stable and reliable value of blood glucose levels for a period of 90–120 days. HbA1c is formed by the non-enzymatic glycation of terminal valine of hemoglobin. The analysis of HbA1c tends to be complicated because there are more than 300 different assay methods for measuring HbA1c which leads to variations in reported values from same samples. Therefore, standardization of detection methods is recommended. The review outlines the current research activities on developing assays including biosensors for the detection of HbA1c. The pros and cons of different techniques for measuring HbA1c are outlined. The performance of current point-of-care HbA1c analyzers available on the market are also compared and discussed. The future perspectives for HbA1c detection and diabetes management are proposed.

CNBP science gets fresh

6 June 2018:

CNBP researcher Dr Annemarie Nadort has participated in ‘Fresh Science’, a national competition helping early-career researchers find, and then share, their stories of discovery. The program takes up-and-coming researchers with no media experience and turns them into spokespeople for science, giving them media training and a public event to present their science to the community. Ten researchers took part in the Fresh Science event for NSW.

Dr Nadort reports on her experience below.

“Fresh Science was an intense, colourful, and informative workshop ranging between fun and hard work. The first day consisted of a Q&A and mock interviews with journalists from television, radio and written news. The participants all had very interesting and new science to pitch and I definitely enhanced my network of Sydney researchers.”

“I also was impressed by the skills of the journalists. They said that society viewed them as the least trusted people, but their professionalism and ability to pick up the most important parts of our complicated science made me think the opposite!”

“The second morning consisted of a Q&A with commercialisation experts, the NSW Chief Scientist and collaboration experts, followed by a 1 minute pitch to stakeholders.”

“The workshop concluded with a final event at the Three Wise Monkeys Hotel: every Fresh Scientist presented their research for as long as their sparkler was still sparkling.”

“I was awarded the ‘highly commended’ distinction for my ‘bright sparks’ presentation which detailed the development of optical methods to improve the detection and therapy of high-grade brain cancer.”

Below – Dr Annemarie Nadort presents her science to an interested and engaged audience at the Three Wise Monkeys Hotel, Sydney.

CNBP Alternate Science Careers workshop

4 June 2018:

Although many students commence their doctoral studies with the aim of being a university academic, statistics show that the percentage who become professors is only around 0.5%.

The RMIT node of the CNBP hosted an alternative careers workshop with five experts who shared their pathways from doctoral studies into the wider world.

Elliot Taranto  completed a PhD in immunology and biology and now works in a technical and sales role at Olympus; Margie Beiharz completed a PhD in zoology and is now a freelance editor; Matthew Lay (pictured top left) undertook his PhD in semiconductor device fabrication and now works as a patent attorney; Shane Huntington’s PhD was in photonics and he is now the Deputy Director of the Melbourne Academic Centre for Health; and Victoria Coleman’s PhD was in semiconductor physics and she now leads the Nanometrology Section at the National Measurement Institute.

The panelists shared their pathways and the opportunities for research, interaction and fulfillment that their careers provided. Often stressed was how the ‘soft skills’ of writing, speaking, and collaboration played key roles in their success.

The session was chaired by CNBP Chief Investigator Andy Greentree.

Below – CNBP’s A/Prof Brant Gibson (L) and Prof Andy Greentree (R) flank guest speakers at the CNBP Alternate Science Careers workshop held at RMIT University.