Monthly Archives: May 2018

An optical fibre-based sensor for the detection of gaseous ammonia with methylammonium lead halide perovskite

31 May 2018
An optical fibre-based sensor for the detection of gaseous ammonia with methylammonium lead halide perovskite;
Shuai Ruan, Jianfeng Lu, Narendra Pai, Heike Ebendorff-Heidepriem, Yi-Bing Cheng, Yinlan Ruan and Christopher R. McNeill;
Journal of Materials Chemistry C; DOI: 10.1039/c8tc01552j.

http://pubs.rsc.org/en/Content/ArticleLanding/2018/TC/C8TC01552J#!divAbstract

 

Facile synthesis of mesoporous organosilica nanobowls

30 May 2018

Facile synthesis of mesoporous organosilica nanobowls with bridged silsesquioxane framework by one-pot growth and dissolution mechanism;
Xin Du, Weike Li, Bingyang Shi, Luying Su, Xiaoyu Li, Hongwei Huang, Yongqiang Wen, Xueji Zhang;
Journal of Colloid and Interface Science; DOI/10.1016/j.jcis.2018.05.104.

https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0021979718306258

New CNBP research node at Griffith University

29 May 2018:

The ARC Centre of Excellence for Nanoscale BioPhotonics (CNBP) has announced today that Griffith University has become a collaborating partner and will host a CNBP research node at its Institute for Glycomics on the Southport, Gold Coast campus.

As a research node and collaborating partner of the CNBP, Griffith University joins the University of Adelaide, Macquarie University and RMIT University as a core member of the Centre of Excellence.

The Griffith based CNBP research node, headed-up by Associate Professor Daniel Kolarich (pictured top left)  from the University’s ‘Institute for Glycomics’, will add to CNBP’s research capability in the development of next-generation light-based tools that can sense and image at a cellular and molecular level.

“Our team has specialised glycan knowledge and expertise that will aid the Centre in its objectives of improving understanding and knowledge of cell-communication and the nanoscale molecular interactions in the living body,” says A/Prof Kolarich.

Mark Hutchinson, CNBP Director and Professor at the University of Adelaide welcomed Griffith University as a new partner to the Centre.

“A/Prof Kolarich and his team are world-class scientists with exceptional knowledge and skills in glycomics. They have state-of-the-art facilities and will add significantly to CNBP’s investigative strength, helping us to achieve the highest levels of research excellence,” he says.

For further information, a media release is available online from the CNBP web site.

Below – Formalities are completed with the handover of the CNBP partnership plaque at the Institute for Glycomics.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

 

Visit and work at the Air Force Research labs in San Antonio, Texas

2018/05/29 : CONFIDENTIAL : Marco Capelli : I visited the Air Force Research lab in San Antonio, Texas : RedXcross16x9 My visit was accompanied by experimental work under the supervision of Dr Morgan Schmidt. The experiments were meant to investigate multiple aspects of diamond fluorescence: from the effect of strong microwave fields near the diamond resonant frequency, the absorption characteristics of the excitation states to better understand the physics of diamond fluorescence and the mapping of nanodiamonds lifetime to explore their inhomogeneity. All those measurements were possible thank to the high-end equipment available at the Air Force Research lab in San Antonio.

Commercialisation workshop outlines opportunities

17 May 2018:

Thursday 17th May saw CNBP, The Institute for Photonics and Advanced Sensing (IPAS) and Adelaide Enterprise come together at the University of Adelaide to jointly host a well-attended Commercialisation Workshop.

The event, with 45 participants comprising CNBP/IPAS researchers, students, Centre Associate Investigators and Chief Investigators looked to provide information, advice and discussion on commercialising technologies successfully, best-practice in starting and exiting start-ups, as well as tips for successful working relationships between academics and industry.

CNBP’s Business Development Manager Mel Trebilcock who helped coordinate the workshop saw the day as a great success.

“Firstly, Adelaide Enterprise provided an overview of a tech transfer office, templates relating to Invention Disclosures, Patents and the step by step process for a researcher ready to start the commercialisation process.”

“Then we had guest speakers – Melissa McBurnie (Brandon Capital) and Stewart Bartlett (from spinout company Ferronova), discuss their history of success and failure along the technology-translation journey, as well as talk about alternate  career pathways for researchers. They both provided some fantastic insights, including the adage that it’s okay to fail but that there is the need to stay positive and focused on your desired research outcomes.”

The afternoon session of the workshop saw attendees break-up into smaller groups and undertake a practical hands-on exercise whereby they had to work-up an invention based on household waste, to fill-out an invention disclosure, and to then provide a pitch to the whole room.

“This allowed for great involvement and interaction with an amazing amount of commercialisation experience being shared by attendees and guests,” says Mel Trebilcock.

New commercialisation workshops are also being planned by the CNBP for August.

“These will help prepare colleagues and collaborators to refine and learn the art of pitches with industry. It will also help them to lead ‘pitch teams’ presenting at a ‘Shark Tank’ style event to be held at this year’s CNBP Conference at Lorne,” she says.

A successful CNBP/IPAS commercialisation workshop at the University of Adelaide.

Microwave pretreatment of paramylon

17 May 2018:

Microwave pretreatment of paramylon enhances the enzymatic production of soluble β-1,3-glucans with immunostimulatory activity
Alexander Gissibl, Andrew Care, Lindsay M Parker, Sameera Iqbal, Graham Hobb, Helena Nevalainen, Anwar Sunnaa,
Carbohydrate Polymers; DOI.10.1016/j.carbpol.2018.05.038.

https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0144861718305708

 

Outreach at Adelaide High School

17 May 2018:

Superstar of STEM and CNBP researcher Dr Sanam Mustafa has taken her outreach skills to Adelaide High School, speaking to approximately 300 Year 9 students (across two sessions) about her scientific activity, her career as a scientist and what it takes to succeed in a University environment.

“My talk was extremely well received by the students and teaching staff,” said Dr Mustafa. “They loved the personal stories and hearing about the light-focused science that we do at the CNBP.”

As part of her outreach activity at the school,  Dr Mustafa also ran an interactive workshop  for students, aimed at illustrating the importance of developing tests to quantify levels of pain for both human and animal populations.

“The students, in groups of about 10 were asked to discuss painful conditions that they had experienced and to try to find a common experience (maybe a paper cut or sprained ankle for instance). I then asked them to rate their pain from a scale of 1-10 to see how this varied within the group to demonstrate the subjectivity,” says Dr Mustafa.

“I then asked the groups to discuss if and why this subjectivity is a problem – such as inability of small children to describe pain, an inaccurate description of pain resulting in the administration of wrong medication and deliberate manipulation of pain scores for drug seeking behaviour.”

“Finally, I told the students how I hoped to develop a test to quantify pain to help overcome this subjectivity and showed them a slide demonstrating the ‘colour of pain’ from our ongoing hyperspectral work.”

“Feedback from the day was extremely positive,” concluded Dr Mustafa. “And it was fantastic to see so many engaged students actively thinking about science and how it has the potential to have such a beneficial and positive impact on society.”

Below – Adelaide High School visited by CNBP’s Dr Sanam Mustafa.