Monthly Archives: April 2018

Stilbenes from Veratrum maackii Regel Protect against Ethanol-Induced DNA Damage

30 April 2018:

Stilbenes from Veratrum maackii Regel Protect against Ethanol-Induced DNA Damage in Mouse Cerebellum and Cerebral Cortex
Yantong Wu†, Shasha Li†, Jinjin Liu‡, Xiping Liu†, Weimin Ruan§, Jengwei Lu§, Yong Liu∥, Tom Lawson⊥, Olga Shimoni# , David B. Lovejoy∇, Adam K. Walker∇, Yue Cong*† , and Bingyang Shi
ACS Chemical Neuroscience; DOI:10.1021/acschemneuro.8b00006.

https://pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/acschemneuro.8b00006

A novel, high sensitivity Sagnac-interferometer biosensor

30 April 2018:

A new publication featuring CNBP co-authors (Dr Stephen Warren-Smith pictured left and Prof Heike Ebendorff-Heidepriem) reports on the design and implementation of a novel, high sensitivity Sagnac-interferometer biosensor based on an exposed core microstructured optical fiber (ECF).

Journal: Sensors and Actuators B: Chemical.

Publication title: High-sensitivity Sagnac-interferometer biosensor based on exposed core microstructured optical fiber.

Authors: Xuegang Li, Linh V. Nguyen, Yong Zhao, Heike Ebendorff-Heidepriem, Stephen C. Warren-Smith.

Abstract: A novel, high sensitivity Sagnac-interferometer biosensor based on exposed core microstructured optical fiber (ECF) has been designed and implemented in this paper. The exposed core fiber has noncircular symmetry and thus exhibits birefringence and can form a sensing element within a Sagnac loop interferometer. The exposed-core fiber design provides direct access to the evanescent field, allowing the measurement of bulk refractive index (RI) with a sensitivity of up to −3137 nm/RIU while maintaining the fiber’s robustness. The sensor can also detect the localized refractive index changes at the fiber core’s surface as the result of a biological binding event. We demonstrate the use of this sensor for label-free sensing of biological molecules by immobilizing biotin onto the fiber core as the probe to capture the target molecule streptavidin.

A versatile platform for nanoparticle surface bioengineering

27 April 2018

A versatile platform for nanoparticle surface bioengineering based on SiO2-binding peptide and proteinaceous Barnase*Barstar interface
Victoria Shipunova, Ivan Zelepukin, Oleg A Stremovskiy, Maxim Petrovich Nikitin, Andrew Care, Anwar Sunna, Andrei V Zvyagin, and Sergey Mikhailovich Deyev
ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces; DOI: 10.1021/acsami.8b01627

https://pubs.acs.org/doi/10.1021/acsami.8b01627

 

MitoQ supplementation

26 April 2018:

MitoQ supplementation prevent long-term impact of maternal smoking on renal development, oxidative stress and mitochondrial density in male mice offspring;
Suporn Sukjamnong, Yik Lung Chan, Razia Zakarya, Long The Nguyen, Ayad G. Anwer, Amgad A. Zaky, Rachana Santiyanont, Brian G. Oliver, Ewa Goldys, Carol A. Pollock, Hui Chen & Sonia Saad;
Scientific Reports; DOI:10.1038/s41598-018-24949-0

https://www.nature.com/articles/s41598-018-24949-0

Fellowship supports ongoing study into chronic pain

26 April 2018:

The Centre for Nanoscale BioPhotonics (CNBP), an Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence is pleased to announce that Logan Jenkins, a researcher at Vanderbilt University, USA, is the successful recipient of the CNBP-American Australian Association (AAA) Fellowship for 2018.

The Fellowship, coordinated by the AAA and funded by the CNBP, provides US$30,000 to support an American graduate student, PhD or early career Postdoctoral Fellow who wishes to conduct collaborative research at a CNBP research node in Australia.

In this instance, it will allow Logan Jenkins, who specialises in Biophotonics, to take forward research that will explore how light can be used to control neuronal activity, as well as to examine how such techniques potentially impact the body’s neuroimmune system.

This area of study will directly align with CNBP’s activity in the chronic pain space says Mark Hutchinson, CNBP Director and Professor at the University of Adelaide.

“Within the CNBP we examine the working neuroimmune interface at a cellular level and in particular, how the brain’s immune-like cells are linked to chronic pain, a condition that affects millions of people world-wide,” Professor Hutchinson says.

“We will work closely with Logan to see how his light-based neuronal control mechanisms, and neuroimmune related study, links to our own advanced research in this area.”

Jenkins is looking forward to meeting the CNBP research team in Australia.

“This Fellowship will give me the opportunity to work closely with a prestigious Centre of Excellence and I look forward to conducting some excellent and impactful research. I also hope to build scientific friendships that will lead to ongoing collaborations and discovery,” he says.

Prof Mark Hutchinson welcomed the Fellowship appointment.

“The CNBP seeks to conduct international cutting-edge research in Biophotonics. In order to do this we need to have the best people in the world collaborating with us. This includes rising stars like Logan who comes to us from the Vanderbilt Biophotonics Center, an outstanding organisation which leads the world in ‘neuronal control by light’ investigation.”

“Logan will be based primarily at the University of Adelaide during this Fellowship and will also spend time at CNBP’s other research nodes as he explores his research program in the Centre,” says Professor Hutchinson.

Further information on the United States to Australia Scholarships can be found online at the American Australian Association website. The AAA seeks to build closer USA to Australia ties.

The research is also being supported by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research (AFOSR) and enabled through access to the Australian National Fabrication Facility (ANFF).

Below – Logan Jenkins.

New CNBP review paper on SERS

23 April 2018:

CNBP researchers have  published a new review paper on surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS), reporting on recent developments and applications, and in particular examining SERS nanotags in biosensing and bioimaging, describing case studies in which differing types of biomarkers have been investigated. Lead author on the paper was Wei Zhang from Macquarie University.

Journal: Journal of Analysis and Testing.

Publication title: SERS Nanotags and Their Applications in Biosensing and Bioimaging.

Authors: Wei Zhang, Lianmei Jiang, James A. Piper, Yuling Wang.

Abstract: Owing to the unique advantages of surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) in high sensitivity, specifcity, multiplexing capability and photostability, it has been widely used in many applications, among which SERS biosensing and bioimaging are the focus in recent years. The successful applications of SERS for non-invasive biomarker detection and bioimaging under in vitro, in vivo and ex vivo conditions, ofer signifcant clinical  information to improve diagnostic and prognostic outcomes. This review provides recent developments and applications of SERS, in particular SERS nanotags in biosensing
and bioimaging, describing case studies in which diferent types of biomarkers have been investigated, as well as outlining future challenges that need to be addressed before SERS sees both pathological and clinical use.

Present at Optics in Cardiology

2018/04/21 : CONFIDENTIAL : Jiawen Li : Poster presentation at Optics in Cardiology conference : RedXcross16x9 Poster title: Miniaturised 3D printed optics for use in optical coherence tomography intravascular probes
This work represents the commencement of the collaboration between Prof McLaughlin’s and Prof Nicholls’ teams.
Conference website: http://heart-team.org/2018-Optics/index.php