Monthly Archives: March 2018

CINSW Fellowship awarded

16 March 2018:

It has been formally announced that Dr Andrew Care, former CNBP Research Fellow and now Centre Associate Investigator, has been awarded a 2018 Early Career Fellowship from the Cancer Institute New South Wales (CINSW) to fund the research project, ‘Biological nanoparticles for the targeted delivery and light-triggered release of drugs’.

This project aims to develop novel protein nanocages for the targeted co-delivery and controlled release of therapeutics in the multimodal treatment of cancer.

In addition, PhD Candidate Ms Dennis Diaz, who is part of the team working on this exciting project, was recently awarded a Research Scholarship Award from the translational cancer research centre, Sydney Vital.

Dennis is working under the supervision of Dr Andrew Care and A/Prof. Anwar Sunna (also a CNBP Associate Investigator).

Further information on the CINSW and its recent grants announcement is available here.

New CNBP visiting researcher

Ashley Grant12 March 2018:

CNBP welcomes visiting researcher Ashley Grant to the University of Adelaide.

Ashley graduated magna cum laude with the highest university honors from Virginia Commonwealth University in Richmond, Virginia, USA with a Bachelor’s degree in Exercise Science with a minor in Psychology.

She will be based at the University of Adelaide for 12 months in the School of Medicine. While there she will be supervised by CNBP Director Prof Mark Hutchinson and will work in pain and alcohol research.

“I’m looking forward to being exposed to studies that focus on the molecular level of pain during my stay,” says Ashley.

Ashley is an avid yogi and blogger who loves the outdoors and exploration, meeting new people and trying new things. She has a strong past history in nonprofit work including being the Development Director for a nonprofit group called Camp Kesem which provides free summer camps for children who have been affected by a parent’s cancer.

“I think there is a lot of pain in this world, physically and emotionally, and my goal in life is to help alleviate some of the pain that can be managed,” says Ashley.

Extending depth of field of MOF imaging probes

2 March 2018:

A fully computational method for extending the depth of field of multicore optical fibers (MOF) imagers has been demonstrated by CNBP researchers in a new paper published in the journal ‘Optics Express’. The work shows that the depth of field can be more than doubled for certain spatial frequencies. Lead author on the publication is CNBP Research Fellow Dr Antony Orth from RMIT University.

Journal: Optics Express.

Publication title: Extended depth of field imaging through multicore optical fibers.

Authors: Antony Orth, Martin Ploschner, Ivan S. Maksymov, and Brant C. Gibson.

Abstract: Compact microendoscopes use multicore optical fibers (MOFs) to visualize hard-to-reach regions of the body. These devices typically have a large numerical aperture (NA) and are fixed-focus, leading to blurry images from a shallow depth of field with little focus control. In this work, we demonstrate a method to digitally adjust the collection aperture and therefore extend the depth of field of lensless MOF imaging probes. We show that the depth of field can be more than doubled for certain spatial frequencies, and observe a resolution enhancement of up to 78% at a distance of 50μm from the MOF facet. Our technique enables imaging of complex 3D objects at a comparable working distance to lensed MOFs, but without the requirement of lenses, scan units or transmission matrix calibration. Our approach is implemented in post processing and may be used to improve contrast in any microendoscopic probe utilizing a MOF and incoherent light.