Monthly Archives: January 2018

Biological hydrogen peroxide detection

31 January 2018:

Two important sensing architectures for detecting hydrogen peroxide, aryl boronates and benzils, have been compared by CNBP researchers, using novel boron-dipyrromethene (BODIPY) fluorescent probes. Lead author of the publication was Dr Malcolm Purdey (pictured).

Publication titleBiological hydrogen peroxide detection with aryl boronate and benzil BODIPY-based fluorescent probes.

Journal: Sensors and Actuators B: Chemical.

Authors: Malcolm S. Purdey, Hanna J. McLennan, Melanie L. Sutton-McDowall, Daniel W. Drumm, Xiaozhou Zhang, Patrick K. Capon, Sabrina Heng, Jeremy G. Thompson, Andrew D. Abell.

Abstract: The detection of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) using fluorescent probes is critical to the study of oxidative stress in biological environments. Two important sensing architectures for detecting H2O2, aryl boronates and benzils, are compared here using novel boron-dipyrromethene (BODIPY) fluorescent probes. The aryl boronate PeroxyBODIPY-1 (PB1) and benzil-based nitrobenzoylBODIPY (NbzB) were synthesised from a common BODIPY intermediate in order to compare sensitivity and selectivity to H2O2. The aryl boronate PB1 gives the highest change in fluorescence on reaction with H2O2 while the benzil NbzB exhibits exclusive selectivity for H2O2 over other reactive oxygen species (ROS). Both proved to be cell-permeable, with PB1 being able to detect H2O2 in denuded bovine oocytes. The strengths of these aryl boronate and benzil probes can now be exploited concurrently to elucidate biological mechanisms of H2O2 production and oxidative stress.

New Centre postdoc at Adelaide

31 January 2018:

CNBP welcomes its newest researcher to the team, Dr Thomas Avery who is based at the University of Adelaide.

Thomas was awarded a PhD in chemistry by The University of Adelaide in 2002 and completed post-doctoral positions at The University of Oxford (England) with Dr David Hodgson and The University of Adelaide with Dr Dennis Taylor. During his post-doctoral tenures, he developed a strong publication record in leading organic chemistry journals typically focused on probing the scope, mechanism and application of novel chemical reactions.

Transitioning to industry in 2008, Thomas contributed to new drug development for Adelaide based company Bionomics Ltd, as a Senior Research Scientist in the chemistry division. Bionomics provided him the opportunity to work on a diverse set of projects developing drug candidates in cancer therapeutics and for CNS indications. Most notably, he was chemistry lead for the program that led to the cognition/Alzheimer’s disease collaboration with Merck Sharp and Dohme (MSD) and more recently the pain collaboration, also partnered with MSD.

Thomas has now returned to an academic research role as a CNBP Research Fellow in Professor Andrew Abell’s group.

Building on his medicinal chemistry background he will work on projects to create potential medicaments and biosensors within the Centre. More specifically, his first project is to create Bortezomib-like proteasome inhibitors with improved selectivity and targeted mode of action employing photo-switchable moieties.

A big welcome to the CNBP team Thomas!

Prof Ewa Goldys recognised as SPIE Fellow

30 January 2018:

Today Professor Ewa Goldys, Professor at the Graduate School of Biomedical Engineering at UNSW and Deputy Director of the ARC Centre of Excellence for Nanoscale BioPhotonics (CNBP), was recognised as a Fellow of SPIE.

Fellows are SPIE Members of distinction who have made significant scientific and technical contributions in the multidisciplinary fields of optics, photonics, and imaging.

Professor Goldys was honoured by the recognition with the Fellowship citation noting her “achievements in optical characterisation of nanomaterials, biochemical and medical sensing.”

“I see this award as a mark of acknowledgement of the Australian standing in the international biophotonics community. I am very proud of my new role in SPIE. As a Society, SPIE plays such a pivotal role in the development of biophotonics and its translation to industry,” she said.

SPIE is an international society advancing an interdisciplinary approach to the science and application of light.

Founded in 1955 this professional organisation promotes information exchange though conferences and publications, supports continuing education, career development, and engages in advocacy.

Below – Prof Ewa Goldys at the Fellows reception.

Magnetically sensitive optical fibre demonstrated

19 January 2018:

A new paper featuring CNBP researchers demonstrates magnetically sensitive nanodiamond-doped tellurite glass fibres. This work is a first step towards magneto-sensitive fibre devices which could be used in medical magneto-endoscopy and remote mineral exploration sensing. First author of the paper is CNBP AI, Dr Yinlan Ruan from the University of Adelaide.

Journal: Scientific Reports.

Publication titleMagnetically sensitive nanodiamond-doped tellurite glass fibers.

Authors: Yinlan Ruan, David A. Simpson, Jan Jeske, Heike Ebendorff-Heidepriem, Desmond W. M. Lau, Hong Ji, Brett C. Johnson, Takeshi Ohshima, Shahraam Afshar V., Lloyd Hollenberg, Andrew D. Greentree, Tanya M. Monro & Brant C. Gibson.

Abstract: Traditional optical fibers are insensitive to magnetic fields, however many applications would benefit from fiber-based magnetometry devices. In this work, we demonstrate a magnetically sensitive optical fiber by doping nanodiamonds containing nitrogen vacancy centers into tellurite glass fibers. The fabrication process provides a robust and isolated sensing platform as the magnetic sensors are fixed in the tellurite glass matrix. Using optically detected magnetic resonance from the doped nanodiamonds, we demonstrate detection of local magnetic fields via side excitation and longitudinal collection. This is a first step towards intrinsically magneto-sensitive fiber devices with future applications in medical magneto-endoscopy and remote mineral exploration sensing.

New CNBP student at Macquarie

11 January 2018:

CNBP is happy to announce its newest student – Mina Ghanimi Fard. Mina is undertaking a Master of Research in Molecular Sciences at Macquarie University and is based in the Department of Chemistry and Biomolecular Sciences.

Supervised by CNBP’s Dr Lindsay Parker, her project title is ‘Targeting Sugar Receptors with Bio-conjugated Nanodiamonds in a 3D Model of Human Brain Cancer.’

Mina has a Bachelor Degree  of General Biology from Azad University in Iran and a Master of Managerial Psychology from HELP University in Malaysia.

Areas of interest include biotechnology in general and also cancer related research; fluorescent nanodiamonds and microscope imaging; CRISPER and synthetic biology or anything related to gene modification.

Welcome to the CNBP team Mina!

New aptasensor able to detect intracellular IFN-γ

8 January 2018:

A new research paper, resulting from a partnership between CNBP and Jilin University has been published, reporting on the development of a new aptasensor which is able to detect ultrasmall concentrations of intracellular IFN-γ. This simple and highly sensitive sensor is able to be used for real-time bio-imaging, providing  a universal sensing platform for monitoring a spectrum of molecules secreted by cells.

Journal: ACS Sensors.

Publication title: “Turn-on” Fluorescent Aptasensor Based on AIEgen Labeling for the Localization of IFN-γ in Live Cells.

Author: Ke Ma, Fengli Zhang, Nima Sayyadi, Wenjie Chen, Ayad G. Anwer, Andrew Care, Bin Xu , Wenjing Tian, Ewa M. Goldys and Guozhen Liu.

Abstract: We report an aggregation-induced emission fluorogen (AIEgen)-based turn-on fluorescent aptasensor able to detect the ultrasmall concentration of intracellular IFN-γ. The aptasensor consists of an IFN-γ aptamer labeled with a fluorogen with a typical aggregation-induced emission (AIE) characteristic, which shows strong red emission only in the presence of IFN-γ. The aptasensor is able to effectively monitor intracellular IFN-γ secretion with the lowest detection limit of 2 pg mL-1, and it is capable of localizing IFN-γ in live cells during secretion, with excellent cellular permeability and biocompatibility as well as low cytotoxicity. This probe is able to localize the intracellular IFN-γ at a low concentration <10 pg mL-1, and it is successfully used for real-time bioimaging. This simple and highly sensitive sensor may enable the exploration of cytokine pathways and their dynamic secretion process in the cellular environment. It provides a universal sensing platform for monitoring a spectrum of molecules secreted by cells.