Near-infrared fluorescent nanomaterials

Low Res Edit 010628 October 2016:

CNBP researchers Philipp Reineck (pictured left) and A/Prof Brant Gibson explore recent advances in the development and use of near-infrared fluorescent nanomaterials for biomedical imaging and sensing applications in this just released review paper.

Journal: Advanced Optical Materials

Title: Near-Infrared Fluorescent Nanomaterials for Bioimaging and Sensing

Authors: Philipp Reineck and Brant Cameron Gibson

Abstract: A great challenge in noninvasive biomedical imaging is the acquisition of
images inside a biological system at the cellular level. Common modalities used today
such as magnetic resonance or computed tomography imaging have the advantage that
any part of a living organism can be imaged at any depth, but are limited to millimeter
resolution and can usually not be employed e.g., for surgical guidance. Optical imaging
techniques offer resolution on the 100 nanometer scale, but are limited by the strong
attenuation of visible light by biological matter and are traditionally used to image on the
surface. Near-infrared light in the “biological windows” can penetrate much deeper into
biological samples, rendering fluorescence-based imaging a viable alternative. In the past
two decades, many fluorescent nanomaterials have been developed to operate in the near
infrared, yet only few materials emitting above 1000 nm exist and none are approved for
clinical use. This review describes recent advances in the development and use of nearinfrared fluorescent nanomaterials for biomedical imaging and sensing applications. The physical and chemical properties as well as the bioconjugation and application of materials such as organic fluorophores, semiconductor quantum dots, carbon-based materials, rare earth materials, and polymer particles are discussed.

The paper is accessible online.