Monthly Archives: October 2016

Near-infrared fluorescent nanomaterials

Low Res Edit 010628 October 2016:

CNBP researchers Philipp Reineck (pictured left) and A/Prof Brant Gibson explore recent advances in the development and use of near-infrared fluorescent nanomaterials for biomedical imaging and sensing applications in this just released review paper.

Journal: Advanced Optical Materials

Title: Near-Infrared Fluorescent Nanomaterials for Bioimaging and Sensing

Authors: Philipp Reineck and Brant Cameron Gibson

Abstract: A great challenge in noninvasive biomedical imaging is the acquisition of
images inside a biological system at the cellular level. Common modalities used today
such as magnetic resonance or computed tomography imaging have the advantage that
any part of a living organism can be imaged at any depth, but are limited to millimeter
resolution and can usually not be employed e.g., for surgical guidance. Optical imaging
techniques offer resolution on the 100 nanometer scale, but are limited by the strong
attenuation of visible light by biological matter and are traditionally used to image on the
surface. Near-infrared light in the “biological windows” can penetrate much deeper into
biological samples, rendering fluorescence-based imaging a viable alternative. In the past
two decades, many fluorescent nanomaterials have been developed to operate in the near
infrared, yet only few materials emitting above 1000 nm exist and none are approved for
clinical use. This review describes recent advances in the development and use of nearinfrared fluorescent nanomaterials for biomedical imaging and sensing applications. The physical and chemical properties as well as the bioconjugation and application of materials such as organic fluorophores, semiconductor quantum dots, carbon-based materials, rare earth materials, and polymer particles are discussed.

The paper is accessible online.

 

 

CNBP researcher at precision sensing workshop

Jingxian Yu_low_sq26 October 2016:

Dr Jingxian Yu, CNBP researcher has attended the Workshop on Precision Sensing for Defence, held at the Australian National University on October 23-25th 2016. The workshop was by invitation only with the aim of presenting and discussing Australia’s strengths in precision sensing technology, and to plan for collaborative arrangements to advance Australian precision sensing thorough the newly launched Next Generation Fund.

CNBP annual retreat shines

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA23 October 2016:

CNBP aligned researchers came together at the McCracken Country Club, Victor Harbour, South Australia from the 19th-22nd October, for the annual CNBP Retreat.

The Retreat brings the CNBP community together, to discuss and explore the science underpinning the success of the Centre, as well as to provide opportunities for networking and engagement, to build on powerful collaborations and to undertake learning and professional development.

Spread over three and a half days, there was a huge variety of activity including science sessions, talks, guest presenters, data-blitzes, elevator pitches, poster sessions, professional development and more.

Specific highlights included:

  • Great advice from Tiffany Walsh on applying for awards and funding
  • A presentation form CNBP- AAA Fellow Mike Baratta from The University of Colorado Boulder on neuro circuitry and brain function
  • CNBP friend Yves De Koninck exploring super resolution imaging, molecule tracking, cell mechanics and sensory signals
  • Tracy Maxted, founder of The Missing Think explaining techniques to ensure effective transdisciplinary collaboration
  • Quickfire science presentations to ensure effective and clear communication of research
  • Survey and associated word-cloud activity to help  identify what creates successful interdisciplinary collaborations
  • CNBP AI Stephen Warren-Smith encouraging early career researchers to take positions overseas to aid collaboration and connectedness, essential in ongoing and successful research careers

The social activities and ability to network and engage more deeply with colleagues was also highlighted by attendees as a major benefit with several noting that this had been “the best CNBP Retreat yet!”

Below – Science being discussed at the CNBP Annual Retreat, 2016.

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SPIE BioPhotonics Australasia lights up Adelaide

bau16-art20 October 2016:

The inaugural SPIE BioPhotonics Australasia conference took place in Adelaide, Australia, from the 16th-19th October 2016.

Close to 200 world leading researchers, clinicians, policy-makers, suppliers and other industry professionals were in attendance at the event which was jointly hosted by the ARC Centre of Excellence for Nanoscale BioPhotonics and SPIE (The International Society for Optics and Photonics).

Over the course of the four day conference, the latest in light-based technologies and techniques were explored, with the objective of improving understanding of biology, and increasing knowledge of how living systems work at a cellular and molecular level. Biomedical, diagnostic and advanced imaging applications all featured as part of the innovative research-led program.

Plenary talks and themed sessions took place, as did speed science discussions and networking opportunities focused on increasing research and industry engagement. An exhibition hall featured company booths, demonstrating the latest in advanced microscopy and imaging equipment.

The conference also focused on inspiring the next generation of scientists, with one-hundred South Australian students visiting the event to take part in a half-day outreach session that included talks, poster sessions, light inspired science demonstrations and discussion time with leading researchers.

Prof Mark Hutchinson, CNBP Director, believed the conference to be highly successful noting, “We attracted top international researchers here to South Australia including six plenary speakers who are experts in the photonics field. Talks ranged from new imaging technologies to help us understand how brains work, through to new 3D techniques to model living tissue, to new fibre-optical sensors that can be used in the tiniest of nano-environments. The program was absolutely full of exciting research.”

The event’s two co-hosts (SPIE and the CNBP) are already exploring opportunities for an even larger follow-up conference to potentially take place in 2018.

Below – Conference attendees make their way into the main auditorium.

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Conference outreach inspires

_mon255419 October 2016:

As a part of the SPIE Biophotonics Australasia conference, the Centre for Nanoscale BioPhotonics organised a half day outreach session for approximately 100 South Australian students on the 19 October, 2016.

The session, focused on inspiring the next generation of scientists, saw Yr 10 and 11 students  from Concordia College, Seaview High School and Seymour College all attend the conference and enjoy talks, poster sessions, light inspired science demonstrations and discussion time with leading researchers.

Feedback from the teachers and students, and CNBP researchers involved was hugely positive with a sample of comments from students included below –

Melisa – Seaview High School Student

“I really enjoyed the exhibition and presentation due to how professional the researchers/scientists were about their job and what they do. They explained the importance of science and the significance new modern research have on the world and society, in addition to how diverse science is and the vast range of job opportunities available in various fields of the industry. I enjoyed the practicals which were demonstrated as the visuals and results of the experiments were something I had never seen before. Furthermore, the practicals conducted made me realise how amazing and powerful science can be and how everything should be done outside the box with no limits. I’ve always enjoyed science though I was never sure if I would contribute to the industry in the future, however this excursion opened me up to new opportunities and I can potentially see myself having a career in science.

Minh – Seaview High School Student

“The excursion was really eye opening to see how advanced we are and our capabilities of how we can benefit in the medical field with new technology. The event was really fascinating and displayed a lot of visuals to help with the explanation. I learnt about how we can manipulate light properties to change and create new methods and technology to help in the medical field. This BioPhotonics excursion impacted my view on future careers and courses in the science field and how new job fields can be created.”

Stephanie – Seaview High School Student

“It was a great opportunity to delve into the various aspects of science, especially biology and physics, that allowed me to think deeper about the different careers science can provide. The many different ways that light can be used in researching was interesting and the various experiments conducted were definitely a new experience. It was an inspiring event that changed my view on science, which changed my perspective of science and the courses I could take in the future related to Biophotonics.”

Below – CNBP researcher Denitza Denkova explains photonics to students.

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CNBP researcher visits China

Michelle-Zhang_1_sq18 October 2016:

CNBP researcher Michelle Zhang has spent time in China meeting and discussing CNBP related science with researchers at the Institute of Immunology,  Chinese Academy of Science in Beijing (Oct 13th) and at the Biology Institute of Shandong Academy of Sciences (Oct 17th-18th).

Michelle first met with Professor Lixin Zhang and his team at the Institute of Immunology of Chinese Academy of Science in Beijing where a senior researcher, Fuhang Song gave her a tour of their facilities. She also attended a group meeting and gave a presentation about her research as well as talking about wider CNBP activity. While there she listened to the presentations of three of their group members and had helpful discussions based on the topics of the development of novel antibiotics and the biosensing of multi drug resistant microbial. Potential future collaborations were also explored.

At the Biology Institute of Shandong Academy of Sciences, Michelle visited Professor Changheng Liu, senior researcher Chunyuan Bi and their teams, while also undertaking a tour of their facilities with a focus on their biosensing device developing laboratories. Researchers also showed her their work in the development of biosensing devices for lactose and hydrogen peroxide. Once again detailed discussions about potential future collaboration possibilities were undertaken.

Director attends Government event in Tokyo

Mark Hutchinson_1_low_sq11 October 2016:

The Director, CNBP (Professor Mark Hutchinson) attended the Australian Research Council CoEx(po) at the Australian Embassy in Tokyo, Japan, on 11 October 2016, as an invited speaker.

Leaders from three of Australia’s leading research Centres spoke about their work in developing the next generation of health and medical devices and the opportunities for collaboration as they saw them.

More specifically, Prof Hutchinson discussed the benefits of an interdisciplinary approach for fundamental and applied research and provided an overview of current CNBP science and activity.

New video by CNBP

cnbplogosquare110 October 2016:

The Centre for Nanoscale BioPhotonics (CNBP) has just released it’s latest video exploring the organisation’s innovative work with nanoparticles, designed to detect targets in cells so that molecular activity can be measured and quantified, in tissue and in the living body.

Shot on location at the University of Adelaide, Macquarie University and RMIT University in Melbourne, the video features CNBP researchers (biologists, physicists and chemists) and showcases the organisation’s trans-disciplinary approach to science.

Click here to view the video and to learn more about CNBP’s exciting and innovative research – leading to next generation diagnostic tools to better understand disease, drug response and future therapeutics.

Below – The videographer begins filming at the CNBP laboratories at Macquarie University.

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Goldys gives public talk on cell colour

Ewa Goldys Low Res Edit 01594 October 2016:

CNBP Deputy Director Prof Ewa Goldys gave a colourful and illuminating public talk at Macquarie University today, discussing a pioneering hyperspectral imaging technique that is helping researchers better understand the composition of cells, right down at a molecular level.

The talk, entitled, ‘A Eureka Moment for Cell Colour Technology’, explored the use of colour information to differentiate between cells – applying photonics to biology.

Goldys believes that this next-generation methodology offers a new window to non-invasively and rapidly detect major health conditions including neurodegeneration, cancer and diabetes.

The research won Goldys and her colleague Martin Gosnell, the 2016 ANSTO Eureka Prize for Innovative Use of Technology.

Below: Ewa Goldys presenting her work on the fluorescent colour signatures of living cells and tissues, using big data techniques and innovative computing technology .

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