Monthly Archives: September 2016

Director attends IASP 16th World Congress on Pain

Mark Hutchinson_1_low_sq30 September 2016:

Professor Mark Hutchinson, CNBP Director has attended the IASP 16th World Congress on Pain in Yokohama, Japan, 26-30th September 2016. The event is the world’s premier conference devoted to pain research and treatment, with Prof Hutchinson also speaking at a session during the conference with a talk titled, ‘The role of toll-like receptors as key modulators of chronic pain: similarities and differences between males and females’.

During this overseas visit to Japan, Professor Hutchinson also took a small delegation of staff from the Pain Unit of the Royal Adelaide Hospital to visit Nagoya University where they met with Professor Akihiro Yamanaka, Dr Hideki Kasuya and Dr Ossama El-Kabbani. Here Prof Hutchinson presented a talk entitled, ‘ The Beacon of Enlightenment – how light based sensing technologies can change and quantify the previously unmeasurable and lead to changes in clinical practice’.

Florey Postgraduate Research Conference

sabrina229 September 2016:

CNBP researcher Dr Sabrina Heng was keynote speaker at the 10th Florey International Postgraduate Research Conference at the University of Adelaide on the 29th September, 2016.

Sabrina’s talk, titled ‘Persistence Towards Progress’ was a part of the ‘Pathways to Success’ symposium’ session. The symposium highlighted leaders in diverse areas of excellence (research, outreach, education, entrepreneurship, and clinical translation). Speakers were invited to present their own experiences as well as to discuss their broader observations (on what helps and what doesn’t) in the transitional process of moving from degrees to careers.

 

CNBP on Scope TV!

Malcolm Purdey Low Res Edit 007524 September 2016:

Scope TV  takes a look at the latest and greatest in scientific advancements and explores what’s up and coming in the wonderful world of science.

CNBP researcher Dr Malcolm Purdey features in the latest episode of Scope, discussing light based sensing and explaining how innovative optical technologies are opening up exciting new windows into the body.

Click to the 5.20 minute mark to see Malcolm and his science communication in action!

 

USA to Australia Fellowship applications now open

cnbplogosquare123 September 2016:

CNBP and the American Australian Association (AAA) are pleased to announce that applications for the 2017 ‘Centre for Nanoscale BioPhotonics Fellowship’ are now open.

The Fellowship, coordinated by the AAA and funded by the CNBP, provides US$30,000 to support an American PhD or early career Postdoctoral Fellow who wishes to conduct one year of research at a CNBP research node in Australia.

Further information on the CNBP-AAA Fellowship and application details can be found online from the American Australian Association website.

Enhanced glycosylation characterisation wins HUPO PhD prize

chris_ashwood-low-rez422 September 2016:

Christopher Ashwood, CNBP PhD Candidate, has presented at an industry seminar and won a PhD award for his poster at the Human Proteome Organization World Congress from 18-22 September 2016, in Taipei, Taiwan. The conference theme was “Precision Proteomics for Precision Biology and Medicine.”

Chris Ashwood’s presentation and poster were both titled “Improving confidence in glycan structure characterisation using alternative CID fragmentation.” Discussed was the use of new technology and innovative tools to enhance characterisation of protein glycosylation using mass spectrometry with applications in mammalian protein glycosylation.

Oocyte IVM defined

Jeremy Thompson22 September 2016:

A/Prof Jeremy Thompson, CNBP CI is coauthor on the following research paper that explores definitions relating to ‘oocyte in vitro maturation (IVM)’. It follows recent attempts to clarify apparent differences among clinicians in use of the term.

Journal: Human Reproduction

Title: The Definition of IVM is Clear – Variations need Defining.

Authors: Michel De Vos, Johan Smitz, Jeremy G Thompson and Robert B Gilchrist.

Abstract: Oocyte in vitro maturation (IVM) is currently defined as the maturation in vitro of immature cumulus-oocyte complexes collected from antral follicles. This is the original definition as first described by Pincus and Enzmann and then by Edwards many decades ago, and this clear and unambiguous definition has served us well ever since. In an attempt to clarify apparent differences among clinicians, the following revised definition of IVM was recently proposed: ‘The retrieval of oocytes from small and intermediate sized follicles in an ovary before the largest follicle has surpassed 13 mm in mean diameter’. As such, this proposed definition should encompass the use of hCG triggering. To change the clear and long-serving definition of IVM to fit varying clinical practices requires a compelling justification based on solid scientific and clinical grounds. We are of the opinion that the proposed revised definition of IVM is counterintuitive as it includes protocols that are intended to mature oocytes in vivo The proposed definitions are cumbersome and indeed further complicate the situation. It is not scientifically rational to base the definition on follicular size, and the definition ignores the vast corporate knowledge acquired from the many decades and >6000 publications in animal research that universally practices IVM as per the existing definition. Furthermore, such a definition can lead to false results in interpreting the follow-up of children conceived using IVM. Hence, we see no rationale to change the existing definition of IVM. However, we agree that variations on IVM require alternative nomenclature-these definitions need to be intuitive and need to clearly distinguish themselves from the existing long-standing definition of IVM. This would help to clarify the recent confusion within the clinical ART community as to what is and what is not, IVM.

The paper is accessible online.

 

Wide-field optical coherence micro-elastography

rodney-kirk_2_sq_lowrez19 September 2016:

Wide-field optical coherence micro-elastography for intraoperative assessment of human breast cancer margins; Wes M. Allen, Lixin Chin, Philip Wijesinghe, Rodney W. Kirk, Bruce Latham, David D. Sampson, Christobel M. Saunders, and Brendan F. Kennedy
Biomedical Optics Express Vol. 7, Issue 10, DOI: 10.1364/BOE.7.004139.

https://www.osapublishing.org/boe/abstract.cfm?uri=boe-7-10-4139

CNBP at SA Cattle Producers Forum

Mark Hutchinson_1_low_sq16 September 2016:

Professor Mark Hutchinson, CNBP Director has spoken at the inaugural South Australian Cattle Producers Forum on Friday, 16 September 2016, at The Carlton Club in Hahndorf.

The forum was coordinated by Livestock SA, with support from the Cattle Council of Australia (CCA) and sponsorship from Meat & Livestock Australia (MLA).

Prof Hutchinson’s talk was titled ‘Measurement Technology and Potential Applications for Agriculture in the Next Five Years’. Discussed was CNBP science and the measurement of all things biological at the nanoscale. Of specific focus was the potential of CNBP tools and technology for applications involving livestock. This including developing methods to measure novel traits on animals and on carcasses, including for key eating quality traits such as intramuscular fat.

Peptidomimetic boronates as proteasome inhibitors

Michelle-Zhang_1_sq13 September 2016:

CNBP researchers Xiaozhou (Michelle) Zhang & Prof Andrew Abell explore peptidomimetic boronates as proteasome inhibitors in the latest issue of ACS Medicinal Chemistry Letters.

Journal: ACS Medicinal Chemistry Letters.

Title: New Peptidomimetic Boronates for Selective Inhibition of the Chymotrypsin-Like Activity of the 26S Proteasome.

Authors: Xiaozhou Zhang, Alaknanda Adwal, Andrew G Turner, David F Callen and Andrew D Abell.

Abstract: Proteasome is a large proteinase complex that degrades proteins via its three catalytic activities. Among these activities, the ‘chymotrypsin-like’ activity has emerged as the focus of drug discovery in cancer therapy. Here, we report new peptidomimetic boronates that are highly specific for the chymotrypsin-like catalytic activity of the proteasome. These new specific proteasome inhibitors demonstrated higher in vitro potency and selective cytotoxicity for cancer cells compared to benchmark proteasome inhibitors, bortezomib and carfilzomib. In breast cancer cell lines, treatment with 1a or
2a induced accumulation of the high molecular weight polyubiqutinated proteins at similar levels observed for borte-zomib and carfilzomib, indicating that cancer cell death caused by 1a/2a is chiefly due to proteasome inhibition.

The paper can be accessed online.

 

Researchers light-up festival

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA10 September 2016:

Researchers from the RMIT University node of the Centre for Nanoscale BioPhotonics (CNBP) were out in force to support this year’s AstroLight Festival at Scienceworks, Melbourne, undertaking a wide variety of talks, displays, hands-on activities and demonstrations that entertained and educating over 2000 excited members of the public.

From talks encompassing laser combat in the movies (and how lasers work in real life), to the natural ‘glow-sticks’ found in the living environment, to astronomy at the nanoscale, the CNBP-RMIT team had a blast, in taking their passion for lasers, optics, fluorescence, and all things ‘light-based’ and molecular out to the wider community.

From an evening of highlights, brought together by professional researchers, industry bodies, science communicators and community science groups (and over 250 volunteers), there were amazing wonders of astronomy, light and science to be seen at AstroLight 2016. Not least, a cutting edge fluorescence microscope brought to the event by CNBP that allowed attendees to view the amazing biology that makes up cells, to a scanner that could take 3D images of objects in real-time, to colourful laser based activities that demonstrated just how light waves work.

A/Prof Brant Gibson, CNBP node leader at RMIT University saw the festival as a huge success. “All of the contributors and organisations came together to share their knowledge and expertise and there was plenty of fun and engaging activities for individuals of all ages to participate in.”

Gibson was particularly happy with the way in which the CNBP-RMIT researchers came together to support the event. “They worked tirelessly in producing suitable talks and demonstrations as there was a real desire to showcase our science in the most appealing and engaging way possible. The large numbers of people at our stand and in our CNBP demonstration rooms, all curious about biophotonics, was testament to the effort, energy and enthusiasm shown by our team in making this event so memorable.”

Gibson also commented on the importance of taking science out to the community. “It’s critical that we communicate the fantastic research that we are doing, and that we do it in a way that makes it real and important to the general public and that they can see how it impacts on their everyday lives. Of course, making it fun and exciting as well, is the perfect way to showcase what we do which is why AstroLight is such an outstanding festival.”

Inspiring the next generation of potential researchers was also a key objective to participating. “We really want to encourage an interest in, and continued learning in STEM subjects that will foster future innovation,” said Gibson. “Hopefully some of the children wowed by our lasers and talks will be doing my job in twenty-five years time. Wouldn’t that be great!”

Below – CNBP researcher Emma Wilson demonstrates use of a fluorescence microscope.

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