Brightness and photostability of nanomaterials for bioimaging

Low Res Edit 010623 June 2016:

CNBP Research Fellow Dr Philipp Reineck (RMIT University node) is lead author on a new research paper, reporting on ‘Brightness and Photostability of Emerging Red and Near-IR Fluorescent Nanomaterials for Bioimaging.’

The work was co-authored by CNBP researchers A/Prof Brant Gibson, Dr Antony Orth and Dr Desmond Lau.

Journal: Advanced Optical Materials

Publication title: Brightness and photostability of emerging red and near-IR fluorescent nanomaterials for bioimaging.

Authors: Philipp Reineck, Adam Francis, Antony Orth, Desmond Wai Mo Lau, Reece David Valmont Nixon-Luke, Ishan Das Rastogi, Wan Aizuddin Wan Razali, Nicole Maree Cordina, Lindsay Marie Parker, Varun Kumaraswamy Annayya Sreenivasan, Louise Jennifer Brown and Brant Cameron Gibson.

Abstract:
Many novel fluorescent nanomaterials exhibit radically different optical properties compared to organic fluorophores that are still the most extensively used class of fluorophores in biology today. Assessing the practical impact of these optical differences for bioimaging experiments is challenging due to a lack of published quantitative benchmarking data. This study therefore directly and quantitatively compares the brightness and photostability of representatives from seven classes of fluorescent materials in spectroscopy and fluorescence microscopy experiments for the first time. These material classes are: organic dyes, semiconductor quantum dots, fluorescent beads, carbon dots, gold nanoclusters, nanodiamonds, and nanorubies. The relative brightness of each material is determined and the minimum material concentrations required to generate sufficient contrast in a fluorescence microscopy image are assessed. The influence of optical filters used for imaging is also discussed and suitable filter combinations are identified. The photostability of all materials is determined under typical imaging conditions and the number of images that can be acquired is inferred. The results are expected to facilitate the transition of novel fluorescent materials from physics and chemistry into biology laboratories.

The publication is accessible online.

Below – An artistic representation of nano-diamonds being used to light up and image a long chain of proteins. Image courtesy of Dr Carlo Bradac.

Nanodiamonds image