Monthly Archives: May 2016

UHN Toronto partnership launch

UHN Launch_sq30 May 2016:

The CNBP has officially launched an international research partnership with the University Health Network (Toronto) following a successful event, undertaken at the Princess Margaret Cancer Centre on the 30th May 2016.

The partnership broadens the potential for research collaboration between the CNBP and the UHN as well as strengthens the current links and ties that already exist between the two organisations.

According to CNBP Director, Prof Mark Hutchinson, highlights from the day included an all day science workshop featuring plenty of opportunities for brainstorming between the teams researchers, as well as the  identification of immediate opportunities for materials and sample sharing.

“Formalizing the partnership between the CNBP and the UHN makes perfect sense and will provide both organisations with improved opportunities and expertise in the undertaking of leading edge biophotonics research”, said Hutchinson.

Below, the formal handover of the CNBP partner plaque by CNBP Director Prof Mark Hutchinson (far right) to UHN’s Prof Brian Wilson (second right). 

UHN Launch

Director speaks at CAN-ACN

Mark Hutchinson Low Res Edit 016429 May 2016:

Prof Mark Hutchinson (CNBP Director) has given an invited talk about glial cells and pain in a satellite symposium run by The Canadian Neurophotonics Platform at the 10th Annual Canadian Neuroscience Meeting, May 29th, 2016, Toronto.

Mark’s talk was titled, “The Toll of Knowing you are sick: Implications for pain and addiction.”

The day long symposium featured a number of speakers focused on the use of light-based tools to help decipher the functional neural map of the human brain.

 

 

US Defence delegation visits Centre

US-Defence-Delegation-at-MQ-labs_2_web26 May 2016:

Representatives from US Defense Force science and research offices were today hosted by CNBP researchers at  Macquarie University.

The visit, organised by the Australian National Fabrication Facility (ANFF), included informal talks as well as visits to CNBP’s biology, biophotonics, optics and materials laboratories.

The laboratory visits gave CNBP researchers the opportunity to showcase their work with an overview of CNBP activity and research direction also provided. Discussed were potential synergies and areas of collaboration.

Below, CNBP Associate Investigator Dr Alf Garcia-Bennett discusses his work on protein corona formation on nanoparticles.

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New Research Fellow role for Nima Sayyadi

Nima Sayyadi_web25 May 2016:

Dr. Nima Sayyadi at Macquarie University, former CNBP Associate Investigator, has been employed as a CNBP Research Fellow.

Dr Sayyadi  has previously been responsible for designing  and developing a series of novel europium luminescent chelates which have successfully been applied to the detection of Staphylococcus aureus using luminescent in situ hybridization (LISH) techniques. He has also developed europium chelates using different immunoconjugate platforms for sensitive TGL detection of a wide range of bacteria, protozoa and human cancer cells.

His new CNBP related activity will involve exploring the synthesis and application of novel lanthanide chelates for the sensitive time-gated luminescence (TGL) detection of bio-targets in complex biological matrices.

More specifically Dr Sayyadi’s activity will be focused on the following –

* Synthesis of Europium chelate molecules with different conjugation functionality e.g. amino, sulphydryl, alkyne, hydrazide.

* Conjugation of Europium chelates to protein, sugars, nucleic acids, and characterization of the conjugates.

* Testing and application of time-gated orthogonal scanning automated microscopy (OSAM) and standing microscope (when developed) for single cell detection of Europium chelates

* Time-gated luminescent immunodetection (using IgG and IgM) for detection of target proteins in biological samples (urine, blood, and saliva).

Well done on the gaining of your new role Nima!

Minnesota students visit MQ node

Ewa Goldys Low Res Edit 015920 May 2016:

On Friday May 20th 2016, a group of 25 engineering and physics students from the University of Minnesota visited Macquarie University for a very full day of talks, seminars and laboratory tours.

As a part of this visit, CNBP Deputy Director Prof Ewa Goldys provided a 45 minute talk to the students, providing an overview of the Centre and its key research activities.

The future use of nanoparticles, to aid in healthcare and diagnostic capability provoked widespread interest and discussion in the group as they saw the potential benefits of the still evolving technology.

Below: Ewa Goldys explaining the use of nano-rubies and nano-crystals in CNBP related research.

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CNBP technology targets chronic pain

cnbplogosquare117 May 2016:

A consortium led by Macquarie University, utilising technology established by the ARC Centre of Excellence for BioPhotonics (CNBP), has been awarded a $340,000 Linkage Grant by the Australian Research Council, to target the debilitating effects of chronic pain.

The grant, bringing together researchers from Macquarie University, the University of Adelaide and the regenerative medicine company Regeneus, will support work that aims to relieve chronic pain in animals and will lay the foundations for future human therapies, using molecular tests, cell technologies and immune/hormonal pain generators.

According to Mark Hutchinson, Professor at the University of Adelaide and CNBP Director, the consortium’s activity will not only seek to target the incapacitating effects of chronic pain but will also aid understanding of how men and women feel pain differently.

To find out more you can view the CNBP media release, accessible online.

Image below: Immune cell responses within the central nervous system in response to chronic pain.

Immune cell responses_2

Sensing Zn2+ ions in biological samples

sabrina213 May 2016:

CNBP researchers have created nanoscale biosensors that are capable of sensing Zn2+ ions in biological samples. Such sensors have potential application in disease diagnosis and study, as well as in environmental sensing. The study was published in the journal ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces, May 13th, 2016.

Publication title: Microstructured Optical Fiber-based Biosensors: Reversible and Nanoliter-Scale Measurement of Zinc Ions.

Authors: Sabrina Heng (pictured), Christopher A. McDevitt, Roman Kostecki, Jacqueline R. Morey, Bart A. Eijkelkamp, Heike Ebendorff-Heidepriem, Tanya M. Monro, and Andrew D. Abell.

Abstract:
Sensing platforms that allow rapid and efficient detection of metal ions would have applications in disease diagnosis and study, as well as environmental sensing. Here, we report the first microstructured optical fiber-based biosensor for the reversible and nanoliter-scale measurement of metal ions. Specifically, a photoswitchable spiropyran Zn2+ sensor is incorporated within the microenvironment of a liposome attached to microstructured optical fibers (exposed-core and suspended-core microstructured optical fibers). Both fiber-based platforms retains high selectivity of ion binding associated with a small molecule sensor, while also allowing nanoliter volume sampling and on/off switching. We have demonstrated that multiple measurements can be made on a single sample without the need to change the sensor. The ability of the new sensing platform to sense Zn2+ in pleural lavage and nasopharynx of mice was compared to that of established ion sensing methodologies such as inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and a commercially available fluorophore (Fluozin-3), where the optical-fiber-based sensor provides a significant advantage in that it allows the use of nanoliter (nL) sampling when compared to ICP-MS (mL) and FluoZin-3 (μL). This work paves the way to a generic approach for developing surface-based ion sensors using a range of sensor molecules, which can be attached to a surface without the need for its chemical modification and presents an opportunity for the development of new and highly specific ion sensors for real time sensing applications.

The paper is available online.

Welcome Prof Robert McLaughlin

Robert McLaughlin_update10 May 2016:

We’re extremely happy to welcome Professor Robert McLaughlin to the Centre for Nanoscale BioPhotonics (CNBP).

As the new Chair of BioPhotonics at the University of Adelaide and Investigator for the  CNBP, Robert has a strong and proven track record in imaging research, successful research funding, as well as in team management and leadership.

A world-leader in the development of the ‘microscope-in-a-needle’ technology, Robert’s expertise has been in successfully miniaturising fibre-optic probes encased within a hypodermic needle. These probes have then been able  to be inserted deep into the body to acquire fluorescence and optical coherence tomography images.

Said CNBP Director Prof Mark Hutchinson, “Robert will be exploring novel applications and deployment of fibre sensing and fibre imaging across the three biological challenges of the CNBP. He and his team will bring a wealth of experimental, computational and practical skills that compliment the range of expertise already existing within the Centre. In addition, Robert’s experience in translational productisation and commercialisation will add to the existing momentum of industry and commercial engagement from the CNBP.”

Welcome to the team Robert!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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