Monthly Archives: February 2016

New PhD student at Macquarie Uni

Abbas_web26 February 2016:

We welcome our newest CNBP PhD student to Macquarie University, Abbas Habibalahi.

Abbas will be supervised by CNBP Deputy Director Prof. Ewa Goldys and will join her research group, working on hyperspectral imaging.

Prior to joining Macquarie University, Abbas graduated with a BSc Degree (majoring in mechanical engineering) from Tabriz University  and then completed his M.Sc. Degree from the Iran University of Science & Technology (also majoring in mechanical engineering).

He has researched experimentally on sensors, measurement and non-destructive evaluation of components and materials . His final thesis explored material characterization and was titled, “Residual stress measurement using ultrasonic waves and pulsed eddy currents.”

His research focus and interest is non-destructive testing and non-invasive label free identification related to cancer and normal cells.

Welcome to the team Abbas!

Extending prematuration with cAMP modulators enhances oocytes

Mel McDowall High Res Edit 004022 February 2016:

CNBP senior researcher Melanie McDowall (pictured) and CNBP Chief Investigator Jeremy Thompson are co-authors on a newly published paper in the Journal ‘Human Reproduction’.

Publication title: Extending prematuration with cAMP modulators enhances the cumulus contribution to oocyte antioxidant defence and oocyte quality via gap junctions.

Authors: H K Li, M L Sutton-McDowall, X Wag, S Sugimura, J G Thompson and R G Gilchrist.

Abstract:

STUDY QUESTION:

Can bovine oocyte antioxidant defence and oocyte quality be improved by extending the duration of pre-in vitro maturation (IVM) with cyclic adenosine mono-phosphate (cAMP) modulators?

SUMMARY ANSWER:

Lengthening the duration of cAMP-modulated pre-IVM elevates intra-oocyte reduced glutathione (GSH) content and reduces hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) via increased cumulus cell-oocyte gap-junctional communication (GJC), associated with an improvement in subsequent embryo development and quality.

The paper is available online.

 

 

 

Guest lecture at ARMI

Nicki Packer Low Res Edit 012517 February 2016:

Prof. Nicolle Packer, CNBP Chief Investigator, has today given a guest lecture at the Australian Regenerative Medicine Institute (ARMI). The medical research centre is based at the Clayton Campus of Monash University, Melbourne.

Prof. Packer’s talk was titled, “Integrating technologies to make discoveries in glycobiology.”

Further information on the ARMI and its contributions to regenerative medicine and stem cell research can be found online.

‘Spark of Life’ workshop

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A CNBP ‘Spark of Life’ workshop saw an excellent turnout and much research discussion at the University of Melbourne today.

Led by CNBP Chief Investigator Prof. Jeremy Thompson (pictured right) and hosted by CNBP Associate Investigator Prof. David Gardner (University of Melbourne), the workshop sought to detail ongoing research within the CNBP and Prof Gardner’s team.

Discussed was progress on existing collaborations, thoughts on potential new collaborative opportunities, as well as an exploration of future grant and publication strategies, particularly relating to clinical assisted reproduction application of CNBP technologies.

A highly successful and engaging day, feedback from all attendees was positive with significant potential opportunities captured.

Next steps will see these potential opportunities investigated and prioritized for action.

 

Lindsay Parker at SPIE 2016

lindsay_parker-low-rez-web115 February 2016:

Lindsay Parker, CNBP researcher, has presented her work at the SPIE Photonics West Conference, San Francisco, 2016.

The conference is one of the largest Biomedical Optics & Photonics Conferences in the world.

Lindsay’s paper was titled, “Fluorescent nanodiamond and lanthanide labelled in situ hybridization for the identification of RNA transcripts in fixed and CLARITY-cleared central nervous system tissues” and was selected by the chairs of the  “Neural Imaging and Sensing” portion of the conference.

Further information on the conference is available online.

 

MQ Uni hosts Coolangatta school students

192_denitza_denkova_WP12 February 2016:

CNBP Research Fellow Denitza Denkova has helped host a school visit to Macquarie University’s Physics and Astronomy Department.

The Year 12 science students, from Kingscliff High School, South Coolangatta, were shown a number of experiments and videos relevant to their Higher School Certificate study.

Explained were principles encompassing particle and wavelength duality, as well as the significance of the recent announcement related to the discovery of gravitational waves – a major event in the world of physics.

Vicky Staikopoulos begins PhD at CNBP

Vicky staikopoulos9 February 2016:

We’re happy to report that Vicky Staikopoulos has started her PhD study at the Centre for Nanoscale BioPhotonics at the University of Adelaide.

Vicky who has worked closely with CNBP researchers in recent years as an assistant researcher and laboratory manager, is looking into the role of NO (nitric oxide) and HNO (nitroxyl) in neuropathic and inflammatory pain mechanisms within the CNS and periphery, as well as their involvement in morphine tolerance.

Using novel sensing tools developed by CNBP chemists (Michelle Zhang and Sabrina Heng) and CNBP physicist (Martin Ploschner), Vicky will be supervised by CNBP Director Prof. Mark Hutchinson and Dr. Elizabeth Beckett, Senior Lecturer in the School of Medical Sciences at the University of Adelaide.

Vicky hopes to identify novel targets for drug development in pain management and improve the effectiveness of current pain medication by increasing the understanding of drug tolerance using unique, CNBP generated, sensing and imaging tools for the first time.

Coverage: Counting cancer-busting oxygen molecules

Ewa Goldys Low Res Edit 01595 February, 2016:

Researchers from the Centre for Nanoscale BioPhotonics (CNBP), have shown that nanoparticles used in combination with X-rays, are a viable method for killing cancer cells deep within the living body.

The research, published in the journal ‘Scientific Reports‘ is based on the successful quantification of singlet oxygen produced during photodynamic therapy for cancer. Singlet oxygen molecules (a highly reactive form of oxygen) are able to kill or inhibit growth of cancer cells in the body due to their toxicity.

Co-lead author on the paper, CNBP Deputy Director Ewa Goldys, provided comment on the work and was featured in a number of media publications including PHYS.ORGGIZMAG and R&D Magazine (all of which are accessible online).