Monthly Archives: February 2016

Review paper published in Nanoscale

Annemarie Nadort26 February 2016:

Dr Annemarie Nadort and CNBP researchers Jiangbo Zhao and Ewa Goldys  have had a review paper accepted for the high-impact journal Nanoscale.

Title: Lanthanide upconversion luminescence at a nanoscale: fundamentals and optical properties

Authors: Annemarie Nadort, Jiangbo Zhao and  Ewa M. Goldys.

Abstract: Upconversion photoluminescence is a nonlinear effect where multiple lower energy excitation photons produce higher energy emission photons. This fundamentally interesting process has many applications in biomedical imaging, light source and display technology, and solar energy harvesting. In this review we discuss the underlying physical principles and their modelling using rate equations. We discuss how the understanding of photophysical processes enabled strategic influence over the optical properties of upconversion especially in rationally designed materials. We subsequently present an overview of recent experimental strategies to control and optimize the optical properties of upconversion nanoparticles, focussing on their emission spectral properties and brightness.

The paper is available online.

New PhD student at Macquarie Uni

Abbas_web26 February 2016:

We welcome our newest CNBP PhD student to Macquarie University, Abbas Habibalahi.

Abbas will be supervised by CNBP Deputy Director Prof. Ewa Goldys and will join her research group, working on hyperspectral imaging.

Prior to joining Macquarie University, Abbas graduated with a BSc Degree (majoring in mechanical engineering) from Tabriz University  and then completed his M.Sc. Degree from the Iran University of Science & Technology (also majoring in mechanical engineering).

He has researched experimentally on sensors, measurement and non-destructive evaluation of components and materials . His final thesis explored material characterization and was titled, “Residual stress measurement using ultrasonic waves and pulsed eddy currents.”

His research focus and interest is non-destructive testing and non-invasive label free identification related to cancer and normal cells.

Welcome to the team Abbas!

Prof Andrew Abell elected Australian Fulbright Ambassador

Andrew-Abell-225 February 2016:

Andrew Abell, Professor at the University of Adelaide and Chief Investigator at the CNBP,  has recently been elected as an Australian Fulbright Ambassador, a prestigious honour awarded by the Australian-American Fulbright Commission.

The Commission promotes educational and cultural exchange between Australia and the United States in order to enhance mutual understanding and strengthen relations between the two countries. This is primarily achieved through a program of Fulbright Scholarships to support research and study by Australians in the United States and by Americans in Australia.

Professor Abell undertook his first function as Ambassador (the Fulbright Scholar Presentation Evening) on 25 February 2016 at the RACV Club in Melbourne where a distinguished group of Sponsors, Partners, the Board of Directors, other stakeholders, Alumni and representatives of the Australian and US Governments were in attendance. This was a signature event within the Fulbright calendar, formally introducing the newest scholars to the community.

D2016zFulbrightAmbassadors_web

Caption: Prof Andrew Abell, Australian Fulbright Ambassador (Front row, fourth from right).

Paper published in Analytical Chemistry

Xianlin Zheng_web125 February 2016:

CNBP researchers have published a paper in the journal Analytical Chemistry titled, “High-contrast visualization of upconversion luminescence in mice using timegating approach.”

Authors: Xianlin Zheng, Xingjun Zhu, Yiqing Lu, Jiangbo Zhao, Wei Feng, Guohua Jia, Fan Wang, Fuyou Li and Dayong Jin.

Abstract: Optical imaging through the near-infrared (NIR) window provides deep penetration of light up to several centimetres into biological tissues. Capable of emitting 800-nm luminescence under 980-nm illumination, the recently-developed upconversion nanoparticles (UCNPs) suggest a promising optical contrast agent for in vivo bioimaging. However, presently they require high-power lasers to excite when applied to small animals, leading to significant scattering background that limits the detection sensitivity as well as detrimental thermal effect. In this work, we show that the time-gating approach implementing pulsed illumination from a NIR diode laser and time-delayed imaging synchronized via an optical chopper offers detection sensitivity more than one order of magnitude higher than the conventional approach using optical band-pass filters (S/N: 47321/6353 vs. 5339/58), when imaging UNCPs injected into Kunming mice. The pulsed laser illumination (70μs ON in 200 μs period) also reduces the overall thermal accumulation to 35% of that under the continuous-wave mode. Technical details are given on setting up the time-gating unit comprising an optical chopper, a pinhole and a microscopy eyepiece. Being generally compatible with any cameras, this provides a convenient and low cost solution to NIR animal imaging using UCNPs as well as other luminescent probes.

The full paper is accessible online.

 

Extending prematuration with cAMP modulators enhances oocytes

Mel McDowall High Res Edit 004022 February 2016:

CNBP senior researcher Melanie McDowall (pictured) and CNBP Chief Investigator Jeremy Thompson are co-authors on a newly published paper in the Journal ‘Human Reproduction’.

Publication title: Extending prematuration with cAMP modulators enhances the cumulus contribution to oocyte antioxidant defence and oocyte quality via gap junctions.

Authors: H K Li, M L Sutton-McDowall, X Wag, S Sugimura, J G Thompson and R G Gilchrist.

Abstract:

STUDY QUESTION:

Can bovine oocyte antioxidant defence and oocyte quality be improved by extending the duration of pre-in vitro maturation (IVM) with cyclic adenosine mono-phosphate (cAMP) modulators?

SUMMARY ANSWER:

Lengthening the duration of cAMP-modulated pre-IVM elevates intra-oocyte reduced glutathione (GSH) content and reduces hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) via increased cumulus cell-oocyte gap-junctional communication (GJC), associated with an improvement in subsequent embryo development and quality.

The paper is available online.

 

 

 

Latest paper published in Scientific Reports

Yinlan-Ruan-(3)22 February 2016:

CNBP researchers have published a paper in the journal Scientific Reports. Demonstrated is a novel but simple method for creating transparent conductive reduced graphene oxide film onto microstructured silica fibres for potential optoelectronic applications.

Title: Integration of conductive reduced graphene oxide into microstructured optical fibres for optoelectronics applications.

Authors: Yinlan Ruan, Liyun Ding, Jingjing Duan, Heike Ebendorff-Heidepriem & Tanya M. Monro.

Abstract: Integration of conductive materials into optical fibres can largely expand functions of fibre devices including surface plasmon resonator/metamaterial, modulators/detectors, or biosensors. Some early attempts have been made to incorporate metals such as tin into fibres during the fibre drawing process. Due to the restricted range of materials that have compatible melting temperatures with that of silica glass, the methods to incorporate metals along the length of the fibres are very challenging. Moreover, metals are nontransparent with strong light absorption, which causes high fibre loss. This article demonstrates a novel but simple method for creating transparent conductive reduced graphene oxide film onto microstructured silica fibres for potential optoelectronic applications. The strongly confined evanescent field of the suspended core fibres with only 2 μW average power was creatively used to transform graphene oxide into reduced graphene oxide with negligible additional loss. Existence of reduced graphene oxide was confirmed by their characteristic Raman signals, shifting of their fluorescence peaks as well as largely decreased resistance of the bulk GO film after laser beam exposure.

The paper is open access and available online.

Guest lecture at ARMI

Nicki Packer Low Res Edit 012517 February 2016:

Prof. Nicolle Packer, CNBP Chief Investigator, has today given a guest lecture at the Australian Regenerative Medicine Institute (ARMI). The medical research centre is based at the Clayton Campus of Monash University, Melbourne.

Prof. Packer’s talk was titled, “Integrating technologies to make discoveries in glycobiology.”

Further information on the ARMI and its contributions to regenerative medicine and stem cell research can be found online.

‘Spark of Life’ workshop

??????????????????????17 February 2016:

A CNBP ‘Spark of Life’ workshop saw an excellent turnout and much research discussion at the University of Melbourne today.

Led by CNBP Chief Investigator Prof. Jeremy Thompson (pictured right) and hosted by CNBP Associate Investigator Prof. David Gardner (University of Melbourne), the workshop sought to detail ongoing research within the CNBP and Prof Gardner’s team.

Discussed was progress on existing collaborations, thoughts on potential new collaborative opportunities, as well as an exploration of future grant and publication strategies, particularly relating to clinical assisted reproduction application of CNBP technologies.

A highly successful and engaging day, feedback from all attendees was positive with significant potential opportunities captured.

Next steps will see these potential opportunities investigated and prioritized for action.

 

Lindsay Parker at SPIE 2016

lindsay_parker-low-rez-web115 February 2016:

Lindsay Parker, CNBP researcher, has presented her work at the SPIE Photonics West Conference, San Francisco, 2016.

The conference is one of the largest Biomedical Optics & Photonics Conferences in the world.

Lindsay’s paper was titled, “Fluorescent nanodiamond and lanthanide labelled in situ hybridization for the identification of RNA transcripts in fixed and CLARITY-cleared central nervous system tissues” and was selected by the chairs of the  “Neural Imaging and Sensing” portion of the conference.

Further information on the conference is available online.