Monthly Archives: September 2015

Seeing into the body, one photon at a time

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA30 September 2015:

In support of the official opening of CNBP’s RMIT University research node, a public lecture was undertaken by CNBP Chief Investigator and RMIT Professor, Andrew Greentree on Wednesday September 30th.

The lecture, titled ‘Seeing into the body, one photon at a time’, saw Andrew Greentree discussing the nature of light, quantum physics, and how new understandings are leading to new biological insights. Also explained was the nano biophotonic research that CNBP is currently undertaking, based on this innovative inter-disciplinary research.

With practical demonstrations (including the use of lasers, table tennis balls and an extra long Slinky) interspersing the 60 minute talk, over 200 members of the public attended and experienced first hand, the passion that Andy brings to his work. Feedback from the event was universally positive.

 

 

CNBP’s RMIT node officially launched

RMIT-launch_web29 September 2015:

Senator Bridget McKenzie, Martin Bean Vice Chancellor and President of RMIT University, and Professor Calum Drummond RMIT Deputy Vice-Chancellor Research and Innovation and Vice-President, jointly launched the RMIT Research Node of the ARC Centre of Excellence for Nanoscale BioPhotonics (CNBP) at a formal event today, Tuesday September 29, 2015.

The event, which was timed to coincide with the opening of a new $3m  state-of-the-art laboratory for CNBP at RMIT, saw a full turnout, with CNBP representatives from all research nodes (the University of Adelaide, Macquarie University and RMIT), plus invited guests, all in attendance.

In addition to launch speeches by the Senator and RMIT’s Martin Bean and Calum Drummond, were speeches by CNBP Director Mark Hutchinson, CNBP RMIT node leader Brant Gibson and Fiona Cameron, ARC Executive Director for Biological Sciences and Biotechnology.

All looked forward to the exciting discoveries that would take place at CNBP’s RMIT research node, with the event concluding with the formal unveiling of the CNBP plaque, networking opportunities and lab tours for both guests and off-site CNBP researchers.

The new CNBP laboratory facility at RMIT will house two state-of-the-art scanning confocal microscopy systems with the focus on studying florescent properties of nano-particles and biomaterials. Also housed in the new space are staff and research offices, meeting rooms, visitor offices and specimen preparatory areas.

A day of CNBP workshops and presentations took place on the Wednesday, the day following the official launch, with CNBP-RMIT researchers providing an overview and update of their activities to visiting CNBP team members.

 

 

 

CNBP CI at HUPO 2015

Nicki Packer Low Res Edit 012528 September 2015:

Chief Investigator at the CNBP, Nicki Packer, attended the 14th Human Proteome Organization World Congress (HUPO 2015), held September 27 – 30, 2015 in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada.

She was organiser and Chair of the ‘Glycomics and Glycoproteomics’ session and also gave an invited talk, “Glycomics-assisted glycoproteomics: deciphering the complexity.”

Further information on HUPO 2015 is available online.

Lost in Science on 3CR

Andrew-Greentree24 September 2015:

CNBP CI Andrew Greentree was interviewed for the ‘Lost in Science’ radio show on station 3CR in Melbourne.

He was interviewed by Claire Farrugia and discussed Centre activities and his upcoming public lecture, ‘Seeing into the body, one photon at a time’.

The interview aired on Thursday 24th September, but is also available via podcast.

You can click through to the 18:49 minute mark (when Andy’s interview begins) or listen to the entire 30 minute show.

SAHMRI partnership officially launched

SAHMRIlaunchforweb23 September 2015:

Personnel from The South Australian Health and Medical Research Institute (SAHMRI) and the Centre for Nanoscale BioPhotonics (CNBP) came together today, to officially launch and celebrate a research partnership between the two organisations in the area of nano biophotonics.

SAHMRI, partnering with CNBP by hosting the Centre’s cardiovascular theme ‘Inside Blood Vessels’, will help to translate CNBP research into tangible outcomes. Using new probes and sensors developed by the CNBP, SAHMRI researchers will look to develop effective approaches to explore and better understand the factors at play within blood vessels and vascular health.

During launch proceedings, SAHMRI Executive Director, Professor Steve Wesselingh, spoke of his excitement at being able to link his researchers with such cutting edge physics and chemistry. He was also pleased that links between the two organisations will soon be further enhanced with CNBP postgraduate chemist Malcolm Purdey joining the SAHMRI research team from next year.

Professor Mark Hutchinson (CNBP Director), Professor Andrew Abell (CNBP Chief Investigator), Professor Steve Wesselingh (SAHMRI Executive Director) and Professor Stephen Nicholls (SAHMRI Deputy Director and CNBP Chief Investigator) all spoke during the launch proceedings, with the event culminating with the presentation to SAHMRI of a CNBP partner plaque.

CNBP looks forward to its ongoing collaborations with SAHMRI in this exciting area of research.

Pictured L to R below: Mark Hutchinson, Steve Wesselingh and Stephen Nicholls.

IMG_4196

 

Networking with the Dementia Training Study Centre

cnbplogosquare122 September 2015:

CNBP’s University of Adelaide research node has undertaken a successful networking event with the SA Dementia Training Study Centre (DTSC).

The event, hosted at the University of Adelaide, saw presentations by Centre Director Mark Hutchinson and Centre researcher Georgios Tsiminis, as well as talks by DTSC attendees as well.

A highlight was Tsiminis’ talk – Dementia and a closer look at Vitamin B12.

Concordia College visits CNBP

IMG_Georgios-lab_adjustedweb21 September 2015:

Students of Concordia College were left with an improved understanding of nano biophotonics, as well as the opportunities that a science education can provide, following a visit to the CNBP at the University of Adelaide earlier today.

Impressed students were shown around CNBP laboratories by researchers Georgios Tsiminis and Yinlan Ruan, and were also given a number of  presentations, explaining in greater detail what it is that the Centre is hoping to achieve with its multi-disciplinary approach to research.

It is hoped that CNBP visits from Concordia College will be an ongoing activity, helping inspire younger students with a passion for science and technology.

 

 

 

‘Frontiers in ICT’ paper

Andrew-Greentree21 September 2015:

Andrew Greentree, CNBP Chief Investigator is a contributing author on a new paper.

Title: Dark state adiabatic passage with branched networks and high-spin systems: spin separation and entanglement

Authors: Caitlin Batey, Jan Jeske and Andrew D. Greentree

Abstract: Adiabatic methods are potentially important for quantum information protocols because of their robustness against many sources of technical and fundamental noise. They are particularly useful for quantum transport, and in some cases elementary quantum gates. Here, we explore the extension of a particular protocol, dark state adiabatic passage, where a spin state is transported across a branched network of initialized spins, comprising one “input” spin, and multiple leaf spins. We find that maximal entanglement is generated in systems of spin-half particles, or where the system is limited to one excitation.

http://journal.frontiersin.org/article/10.3389/fict.2015.00019/abstract

In-vivo imaging of Vitamin C

Dayong Jin  Low Res Edit 009618 September 2015:

A new paper has been released in Scientific Reports with two CNBP researchers as contributing authors –  Dayong Jin and Xianlin Zheng. The paper detailed the successfull development of a responsive luminescence probe, TOB-Eu3+, for specific recognition and background-free quantification of vitamin C in living cells and lab animals.

Authors: Bo Song, Zhiqing Ye, Yajie Yang, Hua Ma, Xianlin Zheng, Dayong Jin & Jingli Yuan

Abstract: Sensitive optical imaging of active biomolecules in the living organism requires both a molecular probe specifically responsive to the target and a high-contrast approach to remove the background interference from autofluorescence and light scatterings. Here, a responsive probe for ascorbic acid (vitamin C) has been developed by conjugating two nitroxide radicals with a long-lived luminescent europium complex. The nitroxide radical withholds the probe on its “off” state (barely luminescent), until the presence of vitamin C will switch on the probe by forming its hydroxylamine derivative. The probe showed a linear response to vitamin C concentration with a detection limit of 9.1 nM, two orders of magnitude lower than that achieved using electrochemical methods. Time-gated luminescence microscopy (TGLM) method has further enabled real-time, specific and background-free monitoring of cellular uptake or endogenous production of vitamin C, and mapping of vitamin C in living Daphnia magna. This work suggests a rational design of lanthanide complexes for background-free small animal imaging of biologically functional molecules.

The full paper is accessible online.

Goldys speaks at OSA event

Ewa Goldys Low Res Edit 015918 September 2015:

Ewa Goldys, CNBP Deputy Director, was invited to speak at The Optical Society (OSA) Incubator event, “Label-free Optical Techniques for Biomedical Diagnostics & Imaging: Challenges and Opportunities for Clinical Translation,” at the OSA Headquarters, Washington, 16-18 Sept 2015.

The aim of this small invitation-only meeting, organised by Laura Marcu (UC Davis, US), Paul French (Imperial College, UK), Juergen Popp (IPHT, Germany), Robert Nordstrom (NIC, NIH US) and Brian Wilson (UHN, Canada), was to develop vision and strategies for accelerating the translation of label-free optical techniques in clinical practice.

The presentations and discussions were aimed at identifying new opportunities for label free methodologies, to identify barriers to clinical translation and to propose solutions.

In addition to exciting talks with exceptionally condensed scientific content, were discussions on the broader nexus of science, industry and governance, with the meeting proving to be an excellent forum to network with research and industry leaders in the field of Biophotonics.

The meeting was also attended by high level representatives from the NIH and FDA.

The outcome will be a white paper with recommendations to sponsors, regulators and the industry which will be distributed to industry and medical associations and the relevant agencies.

As such, the CNBP is delighted to be able to contribute to the leadership group within the global Biophotonics community